33rd Sunday of Year B

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We are called to both love God and to know him, which means knowledge of our faith is fundamental, writes Father Hawkswell. (Ben White/Unsplash)
FR. VINCENT HAWKSWELL

TO EVANGELIZE, WE MUST KNOW OUR FAITH

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

Jesus calls all the baptized to evangelize and spread the Gospel. This homily is the first in a series of three following the recent Upper Room evangelization event. 

“God made us to know him, love him, and serve him in this world and to be happy with him forever in the next,” says The Penny Catechism. He calls us to share in his own life “by knowledge and love,” says the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Notice: knowledge and love.

Of these two, “love of God is immeasurably more important,” said author Frank Sheed. In fact, says the Catechism, the teaching of the doctrine “must be directed to the love that never ends.”

FR. GEORGE SMIGA

EVENTUALLY YOURS

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2006

There was a very successful funeral director who developed his own personal style of letter writing.  Before he would sign his name at the end of the letter, he would always close with “eventually yours.”  There is no doubt about it.  We all will be eventually his, as we will be eventually God’s.  The reality of death is certain.  The older we get, the more clear the certainty of death becomes.  Such realizations can lead to fear and discouragement.  That is why the image that Jesus uses in today’s gospel is so important.  Jesus is describing the end of the world and there are many fearful signs: the sun will be darkened, stars will fall from the heavens.  But in the midst of this description of gloom and fear, he gives us the example of the fig tree.  It is a positive image.  It is an image of new life.  In the midst of the old world dying,  the fig tree buds and puts forth new leaves.  I think what Jesus is saying is that as the end draws closer, whether it is the end of the world or the end of our individual lives, there is hope.  There are signs of new life.  It is a hopeful description, isn’t it?  It also leads to a question.  What are the advantages of growing older?  What are the new buds, the new life that come with advancing years?

More Homilies by Fr. Smiga

  • Preparing for the End (2006)
  • The End of the Story (2000)
  • A Glorious Ending (2012)
  • Terror in Paris (2015)
  • Only God (2018)
FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

NOTHING CAN KEEP US FROM THE POWER AND PRESENCE OF JESUS

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

We’re only two weeks a way from New Year’s – on the church calendar – where the new liturgical year will begin on December 2 with the First Sunday of Advent. At the end of every November, as the old year of grace winds down, the scriptures turn apocalyptic, speaking, as you just heard, of a time “unsurpassed in distress” a time of great “tribulation,” the “darkening of the sun and moon” and the “stars falling from the skies.” In other words: the end of the world as we know it.

No one knows when this will happen but the Word of God calls us to prepare for it as if it were going to happen tomorrow. As the year of grace 2018 is about to pass away into history then, the church reminds us that at some point the whole of creation will pass away and be forgotten and Christ will come again in glory.

In every age there are those who believe they see signs of the end time. In our own day there are more than enough natural disasters shaking, flooding and scorching the earth; a surplus of hatred, rancor and division in public discourse; and nearly daily news of mass shootings to make us wonder if the end is in sight, if our time is up.

ABBOT PHILIP LAWRENCE, OSB

THE END OF TIME

Homilies

CHRIST IN THE DESERT MONASTERY | 2018

Here we are at the end of this Church Year once again.  Next Sunday is Christ the King and then we enter into Advent.  Today the readings direct our attention to the end of time.  We are promised that if we are faithful, we shall not be destroyed.  We are promised that the Archangel Michael will be there helping us.  We are told that the one great sacrifice for sins has been made and we must cling to the Lord.  God will gather His elect and we must be ready.

Many people live in fear of the end of the world, the end of time, the great gathering of people by the Lord God.  It is awesome to think that one day we shall all be gathered to the Lord with all who have gone before us and those who many come after us.  The fear comes because there is always the possibility that I will not be counted among those who are chosen.

FATHER MICHAEL CUMMINS

THE COMING OF THE SON OF MAN – WE ARE NOT AFRAID 

DIOCESE OF KNOXVILLE | 2015

One of my professors in seminary would often remark that the events of the last days as portrayed in the Scriptures should be read like the labor pangs of birth rather than cataclysmic destruction. In fact, the birth analogy is more in keeping with the fuller sense of Scripture than any “cataclysmic, world destroyed in a ravaging ball of fire, Hollywood movie” version.

The texts of Scripture do not confirm a sort of “theory of catastrophes,” according to which there must first be a complete destruction of the world after which God can finally turn everything to good.  No, God does not arrive at the end, when all is lost.  He does not disown his own creation.  In the book of Revelation we read, “You created all things, and by your will they existed and were created” (4:11). We must also remember that at the very beginning of Scripture, after God has made everything, God looks upon creation and proclaims it to be good. God does not disown his creation.

The “upheaval” expressed throughout the New Testament is that when the Son of Man comes, he comes not in the weariness of our habits nor does he insert himself passively into the natural course of things.  When Christ comes, he brings a radical change to the lives of men and women and it is always a change that brings the fullness of life.

MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

GLOOM, DOOM AND HOPE

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

Today’s readings are full of gloom and doom.  The first reading from the Book of Daniel talks about the end of time being a time of unsurpassed stress where some who die shall be in everlasting horror and disgrace.  The Gospel reading from the Apocalyptical sections of Mark presents the end of time as being the day of tribulations, when the earth will shake and even the stars will fall out of the sky.  Scary stuff, these end of the world readings.

But are they?  Look again at that first reading: Daniel prophesies that many will live forever.  The wise will shine brightly like the splendor of the firmament and those who lead the many to justice will be like the stars forever.  And in Mark Jesus adds, “the elect will be gathered from the four winds, from the end of the earth to the end of the sky.”

 The early Christians did not look at the Second Coming and end of time with terror.  Instead they saw it as a time when the Lord would return to his people and correct the injustices of the world.  Good people, Christians,  were being put to death for the Lord in the most horrible ways.  Throughout the world, little children were starving to death while rich people ate heartily. The conquering Romans, like the Greeks and Persians before them, had no respect for any life other than their own and killed the population of whole cities, men, women and children viciously and randomly.  This is not what God created the world to be.  The world was suffering from sin.  Therefore, the Christians prayed, “Come, Lord Jesus, Maranatha. Come and recreate your world into your image.”

FR. MICHAEL CHUA

LORD JESUS COME IN GLORY

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

The cataclysmic signs that accompany the end should never be a reason for fear but always one of hope. The signs indicate an undoing of creation in anticipation of a re-creation. What these forces destroy is not goodness or life, but rather the power of evil and sin. Destruction has to come before perfection. When things look really bad, a glorious recovery is imminent. As the historian Christopher Dawson put it, “When the Church possesses all the marks of external power and success, then is its hour of danger; and when it seems that no human power can save it, the time of its deliverance is at hand.” History moves toward this steady goal – Jesus Christ. He is the central figure of all history. And so we as Christians should not cower in fear but joyfully welcome the day when Christ returns. This is exactly what we pray for at every Mass. ‘Dying you destroyed our death, rising you restored our life, Lord Jesus come in glory!’ or ‘When we eat this bread and drink this cup, we proclaim your death Lord Jesus, until you come in glory.’ At every Mass we are always praying that Christ will come again.

FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

THE END TIMES

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

As our projects and pretenses mount, as our labors and tasks surround us, as our entertainment and doodling while away the time, we may forget the upshot of our lives. It is to love and evoke love, no matter where we may be, from nursing home to classroom. It is to receive with full heart the gift of Christ’s once-and-for-all redemptive act. It is to sing, with the psalmist: “For you are my God, you alone are my joy. Defend me, O Lord.” It is to welcome the opportunity of each moment, each breath.

Since we do not know the hour or the day, let this be the hour, let this be the day, let this be the time that we live and die.

FR. EVANS CHAMA, M.AFR

DAY OF THE LORD; MEETING THE ONE YOU LOVE

SINGLE HUMANITY | 2018

At the end of the liturgical year we have readings about end times. Not only are they dramatic but alarming too. We risk being overwhelmed by fear. And it would be a pity indeed if fear is all what inspires our preparation for the Last Day. Perhaps, it’s a sign that we haven’t yet grasped the message of Jesus. So, let’s try to see what Good News we can glean from such apparently frightening readings.

The readings for this Sunday would make you think of the preaching of John the Baptist that could leave no one indifferent. Everyone hurried to ask John: what can I do to escape the terrible judgment coming? If we can call that conversion, however, we shouldn’t ignore the fear that spurs it.

For Jews, the Last Day, also called the Day of the Lord, was so important that its coming wouldn’t just pass unnoticed. It would be marked by dramatic, extraordinary happenings like the sun and moon ceasing to give light, stars falling, roars of thunder… What a terrible moment! Unfortunately, that contributes significantly to instilling fear, and consequently, one risks remaining an image of God as fierce judge. What a pity! We miss the Gospel. Happily, it’s not too late.

Fr. Chama’s homily is divided into the following sections:

  • Last Day, is it terror?
  • Can’t we look at it differently?
  • Last Day as love encounter
  • Not fear but filial love
  • Then, I can only Pray:
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Celebrant & Homilist: Rev. Robert Cilinski Guest Choir: St. Catherine Labouré Parish, Wheaton, MD

Sunday Homilies

NOV 14, 2021 | NOV 18, 2018 | NOV 15, 2015 | NOV 18, 2012 | NOV 15, 2009

HOMILY TRANSCRIPTS

MORE VIDEOS

 

What Is the Apocalypse?

Friends, there is something dark, threatening, and a little bit dire about the Gospel reading today, but through it, we see that death is not the final word. We’ve listened to the noise of the world for long enough, and now we need a new spiritual guide to lead us out of our complacency: Jesus.


Sunday Podcast Archive

DANIEL AND THE NEW KINGDOM

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 15, 2015

Our first reading for this weekend is from the utterly fascinating book of Daniel. Daniel is an example of apocalyptic literature, and apocalyptic books reveal something of decisive significance. We see that significance when Jesus comes preaching the kingdom of God, by which he was taken to be announcing the fulfillment of the Daniel prophecy. This is the apocalypse, the great unveiling: a new kingdom has come, a dominion that will last forever.


THE GOOD NEWS OF THE APOCALYPSE

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 18, 2012

Today’s readings deal with the end of time and the great cosmic battle. In the Gospels, Christ fights against the powers of darkness, defeats them through the Resurrection, and brings His people together.


THE LAST BATTLE

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 15, 2009 . 0 Comments

The scriptures for this Sunday represent a biblical genre called “apocalyptic”, which means “unveiling” or “revelation.” The extraordinary revelation of these particular scriptures is that in the death and resurrection of Jesus, the battle against the fallen powers of heaven and earth has been won and a new age has begun, the age of the Church.


THE END OF THE WORLD

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 16, 2003 . 0 Comments

In our rather apocalypic Gospel for today, Jesus is not so much predicting the end of the space-time continuum as he is showing that a new world arrives through his death and resurrection. Apocalypse means literally “unveiling,” and what is unveiled, revealed in the Paschal Mystery is none other than the end of an old way of being and the beginning of a new one.

Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the 33rd Sunday of Year B. We’re in the time of the Church’s year where we focus on the Second Coming of Christ. Fr. Frank talks about why this waiting is active, not passive.
Father Frank Pavone

THE SECOND COMING OF CHRIST

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Watch a video with homily suggestions

Dn 12:1-3
Heb 10:11-14, 18
Mk 13:24-32

We have arrived at a time of the Church year when the readings speak of the Second Coming of Christ. This is a theme, of course, that is echoed in every Mass: “We proclaim your death…until you come again; …As we await the blessed hope and the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ; …As we look forward to his second coming, we offer you in thanksgiving this holy and living sacrifice…”

In some gospel passages, the teaching about the effects of Christ’s passion, death, and resurrection is interspersed with teaching about his second coming. These are two critical moments of salvation history: in the one, the power of sin and death are overthrown at their roots; in the other, the victory is brought to its culmination and full manifestation. Both of these moments are described with apocalyptic language and imagery from Old Testament passages such as today’s first reading from Daniel. What is being conveyed here is the destruction of one kingdom and the inauguration of another. This, of course, is what Christ came to do. His kingdom is among us, thanks to his death and resurrection, made present again to us in every Mass. That kingdom, as the liturgy tells us, is “A kingdom of truth and life, a kingdom of holiness and grace, a kingdom of justice, love, and peace” (Preface of Christ the King).

We live now in the “in between” time, when the kingdom of Christ has been inaugurated on earth, but not yet brought to its full manifestation. The power of sin and death – revealed in evils such as abortion – has been destroyed at its roots. Yet we still struggle, in and through Christ, to bring about a Culture of Life. We must bear witness to the truth, life, holiness, grace, justice, love, and peace that characterize the kingdom. The apocalyptic language of the readings should inspire in us both the awareness of how awesome a struggle this is, and the confidence in the final victory – a victory marked by the triumph of life. “Many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake” (First reading). Life has the last word. “Now he waits until his enemies are made his footstool” (Second reading) – and the last enemy to be destroyed will be death itself.

Mercy also has the last word, as the second reading likewise conveys – mercy that reaches even to those who have taken life by abortion and similar sins.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: We are gathered as the Body of Christ, and await the coming of his kingdom.  We trust in the goodness of our all-knowing and loving God to answer our prayers today.

Deacon/Lector: 

That the Church may be a faithful steward of the gift of grace entrusted to her in order to gather all people into the kingdom of God, we pray to the Lord.

That the spiritual leaders of the Church may reflect the love and compassion of Christ and draw their people ever closer to Him, we pray to the Lord.

That Jesus’ one sacrifice for sins may console those who suffer because of a past abortion, we pray to the Lord.

That those who suffer from diseases of the mind or body may trust in God’s continuing love for them and experience God’s healing presence, we pray to the Lord.

That those who have died in the peace of Christ be gathered into the heavenly kingdom, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant: Loving and gracious God, surround us with your love and care.  We offer these prayers for ourselves and for the world in the name of Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Amen.

Bulletin Insert

Mercy Triumphs 

The Church opposes abortion, but embraces with mercy those who have made this mistake. Let’s all take encouragement from these words of Pope John Paul II: “I would now like to say a special word to women who have had an abortion. The Church is aware of the many factors which may have influenced your decision, and she does not doubt that in many cases it was a painful and even shattering decision. The wound in your heart may not yet have healed. Certainly what happened was and remains terribly wrong. But do not give in to discouragement and do not lose hope. Try rather to understand what happened and face it honestly. If you have not already done so, give yourselves over with humility and trust to repentance. The Father of mercies is ready to give you his forgiveness and his peace in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. To the same Father and to his mercy you can with sure hope entrust your child.” (The Gospel of Life, #99).

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

The “end-time” – A vision of hope

Al Carino

As the early Church was encouraged and given hope by Mark’s account of the end-time, so must we. And because we do not know the “day or the hour”, we must remain vigilant and persevere in our belief to the end.


Seeds of the Future

Antonio P. Pueyo

In August 1976, I thought the end of the world has come with the great earthquake and the accompanying tsunami that killed thousands in our area of the country. It was midnight when we awoke to a loud rushing sound that accompanied the quake. The moon was red as we ran out of our rooms and clung to the big pine trees for protection.


The Harvest

Antonio P. Pueyo

Whether this world will end with a great deluge or a great fire we do not know. Scientific theories abound and they make their way into the creative imagination of movie producers and writers. Predictions have been made as to the exact day or hour. Since the invention of the nuclear bomb, we have come to the awareness that such cataclysm is within our human powers. We are capable of destroying this world many times over. The issue of global warming is not just a theory. Now we see clear signs that it is indeed happening.


The Signs of Our Times

Tom Bartolomeo

Do we recognize the signs of tribulation’ in our time – rampant obesity, coronary angina, diabetes, sexually transmitted viruses and AIDS? We treat their symptoms – infection, anxiety, depression, sleeplessness and acid reflux – with drugs and medications rather than their possibly underlying vices, gluttony, lust and sloth? Greed, pride, envy and anger, what are their symptoms? Is anyone angry at me for mentioning this?


The splendor of holiness and the horror of evil

Douglas P. McManaman

Those who love evil are absolute egoists who feed off of the adulation and praise of others, so they carefully fabricate a façade, a false self that is very likeable. But if we were to get a glimpse of what is underneath, we’d be horrified. But the wise shall shine brightly, because they are completely unstained, like crystal, pure and emptied of self-love, and so the divine light can penetrate right through them.


Who Needs Sacrifice?

Proclaim Sermons

These passages, remote as they may seem to modern and postmodern ears, reflect a reality about the human condition that speaks as insistently to us, today, as it did to the early church finding its identity in Christ.

<href=”http://www.lifeissues.net/”>Lifeissues.net WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

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