6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (C)

PAPAL MESSAGESTHIS WEEKMONTHLY INTENTIONSIN THE NEWS

Papal Homilies

Pope Francis

March 13, 2013 – Present

FEBRUARY 17, 2019

Jesus Calls Us to Happiness – Away from Idols

We are happy if we acknowledge we are needy before God

The page from today’s Gospel thus invites us to reflect on the profound sense of having faith, which consists in our trusting completely in the Lord. It is about demolishing worldly idols in order to open our hearts to the true and living God. He alone can give our life that fullness so deeply desired and yet difficult to attain. Brothers and sisters, indeed there are many in our day too who purport to be dispensers of happiness: they come and promise us swift success, great profits within our reach, magical solutions to every problem and so on. And here it is easy to slip unwittingly into sinning against the first Commandment: namely idolatry, substituting God with an idol. Idolatry and idols seem to be things from another age, but in reality they are of all ages! Even today. They describe certain contemporary attitudes better than many sociological studies do.

This is why Jesus opens our eyes to reality. We are called to happiness, to be blessed, and we become so as of now, to the measure in which we place ourselves on the side of God, of his Kingdom, on the side of what is not ephemeral but rather endures for eternal life. We are happy if we acknowledge we are needy before God — and this is very important: “Lord, I need you” — and if, like him and with him, we are close to the poor, the suffering and the hungry. We too are like this before God: we are poor, suffering, we are hungry before God. Although we possess worldly goods, we experience joy when we do not idolize or sell our souls out to them, but are able to share them with our brothers and sisters. Today the liturgy invites us once again to question ourselves about this and to be truthful in our heart.

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SOURCE: The Holy See Archive at the Vatican Website © Libreria Editrice Vaticana

homilies

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (C)

Pope Benedict XVI

April 19, 2005 – February 28, 2013

FEBRUARY 14, 2010

Divine Justice

Woe to you that are full now…

Jesus, lifting up his eyes to his disciples, says: “Blessed are you poor…. Blessed are you that hunger…. Blessed are you that weep…. Blessed are you when men hate you… when they cast out your name” on account of me. Why does he proclaim them blessed? Because God’s justice will ensure that they will be satisfied, gladdened, recompensed for every false accusation in a word, because from this moment he will welcome them into his Kingdom.  The Beatitudes are based on the fact that a divine justice exists, which exalts those who have been wrongly humbled and humbles those who have exalted themselves (cf. Lk 14: 11). In fact, the Evangelist Luke, after repeating four times “blessed are you”, adds four admonitions: “Woe to you that are rich…. Woe to you that are full now…. Woe to you that laugh now” and: “Woe to you, when all men speak well of you”, because as Jesus affirms, the circumstances will be reversed; the last will be first, and the first will be last (cf. Lk 13: 30). This justice and this Beatitude are realized in the “Kingdom of Heaven”, or the “Kingdom of God”, which will be fulfilled at the end of times but which is already present in history. Wherever the poor are comforted and admitted to the banquet of life, there God’s justice is already manifest. This is the work that the Lord’s disciples are called to carry out also in today’s society.

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SOURCE: The Holy See Archive at the Vatican Website © Libreria Editrice Vaticanahomilies

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (C)

Pope Saint John Paul II

October 16, 1978 – April 2, 2005

December 7, 1990

REDEMPTORIS MISSIO

Characteristics of the Kingdom and Its Demands

The liberation and salvation brought by the kingdom of God come to the human person both in his physical and spiritual dimensions.  

The kingdom of God is meant for all mankind, and all people are called to become members of it. To emphasize this fact, Jesus drew especially near to those on the margins of society, and showed them special favor in announcing the Good News. At the beginning of his ministry he proclaimed that he was “anointed … to preach good news to the poor” (Lk 4:18). To all who are victims of rejection and contempt Jesus declares: “Blessed are you poor” (Lk 6:20). What is more, he enables such individuals to experience liberation even now, by being close to them, going to eat in their homes (cf. Lk 5:30; 15:2), treating them as equals and friends (cf. Lk 7:34), and making them feel loved by God, thus revealing his tender care for the needy and for sinners (cf. Lk 15:1–32).

The liberation and salvation brought by the kingdom of God come to the human person both in his physical and spiritual dimensions. Two gestures are characteristic of Jesus’ mission: healing and forgiving. Jesus’ many healings clearly show his great compassion in the face of human distress, but they also signify that in the kingdom there will no longer be sickness or suffering, and that his mission, from the very beginning, is meant to free people from these evils. In Jesus’ eyes, healings are also a sign of spiritual salvation, namely liberation from sin. By performing acts of healing, he invites people to faith, conversion and the desire for forgiveness (cf. Lk 5:24). Once there is faith, healing is an encouragement to go further: it leads to salvation (cf. Lk 18:42–43). The acts of liberation from demonic possession—the supreme evil and symbol of sin and rebellion against God—are signs that indeed “the kingdom of God has come upon you” (Mt 12:28).

John Paul II, Redemptoris Missio (Vatican City: Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1990).

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SOURCE: The Holy See Archive at the Vatican Website © Libreria Editrice Vaticana

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