33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time C

November 13, 2022

INTRODUCTIONLECTORSHOMILIESVIDEO ARCHIVECOMMENTARYCHURCH FATHERSCATECHISMPAPAL HOMILIESHOMILY STARTERSFAITH SHARINGCHILDREN ACTIVITIESMUSIC

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1st Reading Lector Tips

Click on image to view/listen to lector – The Sunday Mass

MALACHI 3:19-20a

1st Reading – Lector Tips

Notes courtesy of Paul J. Schlachter and Greg Warnusz

In a difficult time for ancient Israel, after their exile in Babylon, some complained that the wicked seem to get away with everything, and that there’s no benefit to obeying the Lord. God’s messenger Malachi assures them that the evildoers will get their due on the terrible “Day of the Lord.” – Warnusz

Central point: Says the Lord of hosts.  This gives the prophecy its authenticity.  Say it as if meditating over a blackened landscape.

Message for the assembly: Remember that this life is a way-station. 

Lector’s Challenge: To let loose with my strongest voice of foreboding.  Look out without staring at anyone.  Do you notice anyone wiping their brows?

The day is coming

  • Twice we hear The day is coming.
  • Blazing – This means an all-consuming blaze, such as we have just seen in the western states.
  • The prophecy in the reading promises consequences for one’s moral position.  Evil doers vs. those who fear God’s name.

All the proud and all evildoers

  • Remember the context: You’re not only criticizing the wicked, you’re responding to the objection that it’s useless to serve God, because the wicked seem to get away with everything. Well, nobody wants the wicked to prosper, not Malachi and not the slackers he’s arguing with. Malachi wanted to show them that God really is going to go after the bad guys. Sound passionate about that.  – Warnusz

 

stubble

  • The earthly treasures we have built will be stubble.
  • Remember the stirring wave of “refiner’s fire” in Handel’s Messiah.  It comes from the same prophet we hear today.

Blazing…fire…leaving neither root nor branch

  • Feel the rhythm of the prophecy in your soul as you rehearse.  In the opening section there are quick outbursts such as accompany a firestorm.  In the final section, the flow of words is smooth and reassuring.

says the LORD of hosts

This gives the prophecy its authenticity.  Say it as if meditating over a blackened landscape.

But for you who fear my name

Change rhetorical gears abruptly, and speak the last sentence soothingly, since it’s about God’s comfort of those who do revere him. – Warnusz

  • Emphasize the contrast between, first, the blazing oven as it consumes all in its path and, then, the gradually warming sunlight.

the sun of justice

  • The “Sunrise” movement of the Grand Canyon Suite may come to  mind, as we approach the sun of justice.
  • Break between the two, and ask whether we are prepared for healing.
2nd Reading Lector Tips

Click on image to view/listen to lector – The Sunday Mass

II Thessalonians 3:7-12

2nd Reading – Lector Tips

Notes courtesy of Paul J. Schlachter and Greg Warnusz

Some early Christians expected the Day of the Lord, in the form of the return in glory of the risen Jesus, to occur immediately. So they dropped all their responsibilities and made nuisances of themselves in the community. Paul corrects them, using his own behavior as an example. – Warnusz

Central point: Christians are not to set out to burden each other, minding the business of others.

Message for the assembly: It is all right to carry each other’s burdens, but we should take care not to toss our burden on others deliberately.

Lector’s Challenge: Put yourself in the apostle’s shoes, as he shows some appropriate behavior.  Remember that a new community is being formed, and that requires a different level of morality and responsibility.

Brothers and Sisters

  • Try to speak this as if you were Saint Paul speaking in person, not by letter. You’re talking to people you love, but some of them have, as we say, gone off the deep end. Their spiritual leader needs to sound firm and convincing. – Warnusz

You know how one must Imitate us

  • You know how is the most important phrase in the first sentence.
  • We hear imitate us twice.  In other words: see how we have behaved among you.  The apostle does not suggest or command some external pattern, but appeals to the recollections and good will of the church.

we did not act in a disorderly way among you, nor did we eat food received free

  • The apostle begins with negative examples.  Not disorderlynor receiving freely, like certain members of the community that he will mention later.
  • PAUSE after this sentence, before saying On the Contrary

in toil and drudgery,
night and day we WORKED

  • The word work is repeated three times.  Common life is not so easy to live out in practice, after the first wave of enthusiasm wears off.  There will be toil and drudgery.

Not that we do not have the right

Model…imitate us

  • Watch the double negative, and leave your emphasis for the reading’s ending words.
  • Remember that Jesus sent his disciples to the villages and told them to stay and eat with those who welcomed them.  So there was a precedent for living off the land, which in fact has been the usual manner for missionaries!  That means that the apostle is going beyond the call of duty.

We were with youamong you

  • Not as a leader who jets into town and stays in VIP lodging for a few hours, but as a true apostle, spending quality time and rubbing shoulders with the people.

From Word to Eucharist

We are coming to the end of the church year.  Let us approach one another as we approach the table of the Eucharist, without our possessions or our pretensions, in an unbroken and simple line.

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