1st Sunday of Advent (A)

November 27, 2022

INTRODUCTIONLECTORSHOMILIESVIDEO ARCHIVECOMMENTARYCHURCH FATHERSECUMENICAL RESOURCESPAPAL HOMILIESHOMILY STARTERSFAITH SHARINGCHILDREN ACTIVITIESMUSIC

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1st Reading Lector Tips

Click on image to view/listen to lector – The Sunday Mass

ISAIAH 2:1-5

First Reading – Lector Tips

courtesy of Paul J. Schlachter, Greg Warnusz and Lisa Bellaci

In the mind of Isaiah the prophet, Judah faced imminent war because of its faithlessness. But he hopefully predicts a time when people of all nations will worship one God in the Jerusalem temple. – Warnusz

Central point: God intends an end for the world very different from the poisonous one we have been building over the centuries.

Message for the assembly: Does it see this alternative vision and embrace it?

Lector’s Challenge: To read the closing words Let us walk in the light of the Lord! with the prophet’s eager longing. .

47 seconds

This is what Isaiah saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem.

  •  It is one of the few readings that carries its own commentary with it!  I would add that many believers hope for its fulfillment across the earth.

PAUSE

36 seconds

In days to come

SMILE

  • We begin a new liturgical year by meditating on our end, which is what God intends for the people.

The mountain of the Lord’s house… the highest mountain.

  • Every land may have its patron God, but the God of Israel will stand out among others.  As the Gospels say, what is hidden will come to light.  We believe that a great part of God’s visibility depends on us who receive the revelation and lived changed lives.  So if God is a God of peace, we must live the ways of peace for the world to see.  Otherwise this high mountain becomes an evil empire.

29 seconds

All  nations… many peoples shall stream toward it.

  • We do not describe isolated events but scenes that everyone can see.  This climbing toward God forms the dynamic of the first part of this passage.
  • When you, as lector, proclaim the sentence about “All nations” and “many peoples,” emphasize those words, so that the congregation understands that Isaiah is asking his audience to accept something new, surprising and discomforting. – Warnusz

May God instruct us in his ways. 

  • And God’s teaching forms the second part.  I must pray that the vision comes closer to fulfillment, at a time when repression and violence are prominent in that land.

23 seconds

He shall judge between nations…

  • It has been spoken through the ages just as I am speaking it now.  It is repeated without interruption, to judge our blind rush to armed revenge and occupation.  What power!  With even a little faith our assembly can bring false power and might to an end.  Let my voice echo the promise.

 

33 seconds

They shall beat their swords into plowshares.

  • To prepare for reading the famous words about “swords into plowshares,” pause now and remember when the horror of war touched you. Perhaps you have had to fight in a war. Almost certainly you remember someone who died in war. You’ve been moved by television and Internet images of war’s devastation. Do you remember the visit of Pope Paul VI to New York (first international travel by a modern pope)? On October 4, 1965, he addressed the United Nations. The world was at war then, in Viet Nam and elsewhere, when the Pope both demanded and appealed, “No more war; war never again!” – Warnusz

Nor shall they train for war again.

  • On the one hand, we are invited to leave war.  On the other, we are invited to use our tools in responsible stewardship of the earth.  Many non-Christians have been inspired by this vision, and some have given themselves to this hope with greater perseverance than we. before the Lord
  • Many have sons in military life as I do, and they know the state of mind that accompanies that life.  Parents pass it on to their children.  If God’s mountain is the highest of all, then every person of other countries and religions is a child of God.  Let us join in a wall of faith that drives back the vengeful hearts in our midst.

19 seconds

O house of Jacob, come,
let us walk in the light of the Lord!

  • Lector’s Challenge: To read the closing words Let us walk in the light of the Lord! with the prophet’s eager longing. .
2nd Reading Lector Tips

Click on image to view/listen to lector – The Sunday Mass

ROMANS 13:11-14

Second Reading – Lector Tips

courtesy of Paul J. Schlachter, Greg Warnusz and Lisa Bellaci

Saint Paul wants the Christians in Rome to avoid the sinful excesses of their neighbors. He’s no longer certain that Jesus will soon come again in glory, but he wants the church to be ready, and to be more noble than their surroundings. – Warnusz

Central point: The night is advanced; the day is at hand.

Message for the assembly: Can we cultivate a sense of God’s calendar, in which we are getting nearer to the “great getting-up morning”?

Lector’s Challenge:  To continue reading as a mother to her children.

25 seconds

You know the time.

  • All the readings today seem to be about time; not the time of day but rather the decisive time of our life.

 

16 seconds

It is the hour now for you to awake from sleep 

  • The apostle treats his listeners like children aroused from their afternoon nap.  Let me take the cue, speaking gently and musically.

51 seconds

Our salvation is nearer

  • We think we are getting older each day, a little closer to death, further from our day of birth.  The church always celebrated the birthdays of its saints on the day they met the Lord.  In a sense, we are getting younger with each passing day!
  • The reading is filled with references to light and day.

Give this reading a straightforward but emphatic proclamation. Contrast “darkness” and “light” in your tones of voice. There’s nothing hidden here. It’s all out front, and of life-and-death importance. – Warnusz

Let us conduct ourselves properly as in the day 

  • It is also filled with purpose.  God’s calendar is not a neutral machine like ours, witnessing equally to savagery and compassion.  We already have seen the flow toward peace in the prophet.  Here we are taking charge of events, throwing offconductingputting on.

Not in orgies… rivalry and jealousy.

  • These are the actions that destroy community, and we are hungry for community in the church.  Read them more in a reminding tone than in condemnation.

Avoid a hectoring or lecturing tone in this reading: it is more like the whispered urging of a friend, encouraging us with a hopeful promise. Yes, there are things that we must put right, but only because it is worth it! Be careful with the pronunciation of the words promiscuity and licentiousness. – Salford Diocese”

31 seconds

Put on the Lord Jesus Christ

  • While the phrase is very familiar, it is not so easy to read.  Let me imagine children dressing up for church.  I need to rehearse it so that my tone of voice rises throughout, to the final words “Jesus Christ.”redemption, the forgiveness of sins
  • The expression “put on the Lord Jesus Christ” is an interesting image. Don’t rush over it. – Warnusz

 

From Word to Eucharist

We are coming to the end of the church year.  Let us approach one another as we approach the table of the Eucharist, without our possessions or our pretensions, in an unbroken and simple line.

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