SUNDAY READINGS PODCAST / GOSPEL PDF

PODCAST – Sunday Readings

PDF Handout – Gospel Text (English/Spanish)

This handout which can be downloaded, printed, and used in your ministry is provided by Bishop David O’Connell (Los Angeles Archdiocese)

Click to access The-Solemnity-of-the-Most-Holy-Trinity-Year-B-May-30-2021-EngSp.pdf

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Homilies / Reflections – Solemnity of Most Holy Trinity (B)

Rev. Kevin Regan (Pastor, Holy Family Parish) preaching homily for Holy Trinity Sunday in the Crypt Church at the National Shrine (Washington D.C.)


Commentary

Sunday Catholic Homilies

Commentary

Fr. Jude Thaddeus Langeh, cmf

Holy Trinity

Cardinal Tagle

THE TRIUNE GOD OF LOVE

THE WORD EXPOSED (2018)

Give witness through your word and teaching that your God is the God of love, the triune God.

Jeff Cavins

TRINITY SUNDAY

ASCENSION PRESENTS (2018)

John Michael Talbot

GOSPEL REFLECTION FOR SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

THEOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS (2018)

VENERABLE FULTON SHEEN

THE BLESSED TRINITY

Father James Kubicki

FEAST OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

POPE’S WORLDWIDE PRAYER NETWORK-USA (2009)

Catholic Online

PRAYER TO THE HOLY TRINITY

CATHOLIC ONLINE (2009)

Homilies / Reflections – Solemnity of Most Holy Trinity (B)

Sunday Catholic Homilies

Commentary

LITURGICAL PLANNING: Monday, May 31, is Memorial Day in the U.S. It is good to remember those who have died, but the liturgy is not a place to praise our country as though it was divinely created as the best in the world. Pray for our country, not to it. — Lawrence Mick

Fr. Vincent Hawkswell

THE TRINITY: THE CENTRAL MYSTERY OF OUR FAITH

B.C. CATHOLIC

This Sunday the Church proclaims that the one God is three Persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. The Trinity is “a mystery of faith in the strict sense,” says the Catechism of the Catholic Church: something we could not know except by God’s revelation, at which Moses marveled… Why is it so important? The answer is that God wants us – creatures he makes, not begets – to share “the glory of his blessed life,” says the Catechism. In fact, “the ultimate end” of all God’s work is our entry “into the perfect unity” of the Trinity, not just as his artifacts but as his children, sharing his divinity by adoption as Jesus shares it by nature. To achieve this destiny, we must be reborn and “conformed to the image” of God’s begotten Son. God accomplishes this rebirth in baptism by giving us his Holy Spirit, the third Person of the Trinity, whom Jesus also revealed. (2021)

Click on title to read entire homily.
Fr. Austin Fleming

OUR SPIRITUAL LIVES ARE EXPERIENCED THROUGH THE CONNECTIONS WE MAKE

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS

Our word religious also comes from a Latin word, ligare: to bind or connect. Ligare:  think of ligaments and how ligaments function in the human anatomy. In its roots, then, the word religious has a very physical connotation: to be religious is to be connectedconnected to God – and connected to other believers.

And that’s just what Sunday worship is all about: connecting! Connecting, through praise and thanksgiving with God and connecting with others who share our faith. Simply put, then:  to be religious is to be connected, to be connected with God and with other believers. By your very being here this morning, you are being religious… (2018)

More Homilies for this Sunday by Fr. Fleming

Remembering God (2015)
I’m Not Really Religious, I’m Spiritual (2012)
Our Hearts are Restless, Until They Rest in God (2009)

Click on title to read entire homily.
Fr. Evans K Chama, M.Afr

THE COMMUNION OF GOD

SINGLE HUMANITY

The Sunday after Pentecost we celebrate the Holy Trinity: the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit; three persons in One God. Someone understands that? Mystery! But what does that mean? (2018)

Fr. Chama’s homily is divided into the following sections:

  • Unveiled, but still veiled
  • Immersed into the Holy Trinity
  • Implication of faith in the Holy Trinity
  • The Trinity, inspiration for living together

RELATED HOMILY: God of Relationship (YEAR A Homily)

Click on title to read entire homily.
Msgr. Joseph A. Pellegrino

BEING TRUE TO OUR REAL NAME

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG

On Trinity Sunday we consider the name of God, Father Son and Spirit.  This is more than a theological dogma about God.  It is also a doctrine about us. It is an expression of who we are.  We are baptized in the name of God. The goal of our lives is to find the particular, unique expression of God’s love that we have been empowered to make present in the world.  The goal of our lives is to reveal our most profound name.

All who are baptized in the name of the Trinity are called to the Father in Christ though the Holy Spirit. We are called to the Father.  The journey of our lives is a journey to God.  This journey may follow the paths of marriage and parenthood, as many of you have taken.  This journey may follow the path of the committed single Christian.  The path might be that of religious life or holy orders.  All journeys derive their meaning from their final destination.  The journey of our lives is full of minor chores and major events. Even our routine chores derive their meaning from their final destination.  Changing your baby’s diaper, telling your child for the hundredth time to clean up his or her room, putting up with your spouse’s moods, giving up going out with your friends so you can spend some extra time as a big brother or big sister, going to work and all that entails, going to school and completing all its tasks, all take their meaning as part of our journey to the Father. (2021)

More Homilies for this Sunday by Msgr. Pellegrino

An Invitation to Intimacy (2018)
The Power of the Name (2015)
Intimacy and Transcendence (2009)
Instructions for the Future  (2006)

Click on title to read entire homily.
Fr. George Smiga

GOD IN SPAGHETTI SAUCE

BUILDING ON THE WORD

God surrounds us in every time and place.  God speaks to us in the gentle rustle of leaves and in the wisdom of a dear friend.  But we need to be able to listen if we are going to hear what God is saying.  God is present in the softness of a baby’s skin or the dampness of the air after a summer storm.  But we must be open to sense God’s touch.  God’s love is present in the aroma of homemade spaghetti sauce or in the favorite cologne of our spouse.  But we must be willing to recognize what is right under our nose.  Where do we find divinity?  Where do we discover the triune God who loves us and promises always to be close to us?  Almost anywhere.  But first we must open our eyes.  (2003)

More Homilies for this Sunday by Fr. Smiga

Doubting Disciples (2018)
Three New Names for God (2012)
Waiting for the Call (2006)

Click on title to read entire homily.
Jamie Waters

ST. ELIZABETH’S MYSTICAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE TRINITY CAN INSPIRE US, TOO

AMERICA MAGAZINE

Today is an opportunity to reflect on the relationships among the persons of the Trinity: Father, Son, Holy Spirit. Especially on the Solemnity of the Holy Trinity, we are invited to pray about the relational nature of God, and we can find inspiration to strengthen our relationships with God and one another.

St. Elizabeth of the Trinity, a Carmelite nun from France, offers us a prayer about her love of the Triune God:  St. Elizabeth’s mystical encounter with the Trinity can inspire us to pray for our own close relationship with God. Likewise, today’s Gospel reminds us that a close relationship with God requires us to share our experiences with one another. (2021)

Click on title to read entire REFLECTION.
Fr. John Kavanaugh, SJ

AT THE BOTTOM OF REALITY

SUNDAY WEB SITE

Walker Percy in Lost in the Cosmos, mused ironically about the strange fate of postmoderns who spend millions trying to get chimps to talk and billions on space stations attentively listening for an extraterrestrial blip that might speak to us.

Meanwhile, we are sheepish about the possibilities of a personal God and positively skeptical about whether God has anything important to say to us. More strange still, humans wonder whether they have anything meaningful to say to each other. We, like God, seem impoverished in this age of personal deconstruction. Some high-priced academics even pontificate that there is no author, there is no text.

At stake are answers to questions about the universe. What is at the bottom of things? Is it the grind of impersonal machinery doomed to the laws of entropy? Is it the endless cycle of nature marked by convulsion, evolutionary chance, and final stasis?… (1997)

Click on title to read entire homily.

Homilies / Reflections – Solemnity of Most Holy Trinity (B)

Commentary

THE MEANING OF THE TRINITY

On Trinity Sunday we contemplate the mystery of God as a play of persons. The Father gives rise to the Son while the Father and Son give rise to the Holy Spirit. God’s unity is never compromised because the three are consubstantial, one in being.


Featured Podcasts

THE TRINITY AS CALL TO ACTION

By Bishop Robert Barron  May 27, 2018

It’s often joked that Trinity Sunday is “the preacher’s nightmare.” But while the Trinity can be viewed as the most arcane and inaccessible Christian doctrine, it’s also the most ordinary and obvious. Every Catholic invokes the Trinity whenever he crosses himself in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Moreover, every single baptized person has been baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Through baptism we’ve been sealed by the Trinity, brought within its dynamic, and sent out on mission.

LIFE LIVED IN THE SPIRIT

By Bishop Robert Barron June 3, 2012

The Holy Spirit thrives on the actions we take and decisions we make out of love, joy, peace, patience and more. These aren’t abstract ideas that result in an internal satisfaction, they have concrete ramifications, rippling out into the world and affecting real, good change. When we choose light over darkness, participate in the sacraments, the Holy Spirit fill us.

THE CENTER OF OUR FAITH

By Bishop Robert Barron June 7, 2009

The Trinity is not simply a theological connundrum for scholars to fuss about. It stands at the very heart of our faith, since it expresses the fact that God is love. Our whole salvation depends on this great truth.

GOD IS LOVE

By Bishop Robert Barron June 11, 2006

On the feast of the Trinity, we reflect on the uniquely Christian definition of God: God is love. Love is not something that God does, or an attribute that God has; love is what God is. This means that God must be a play between lover, beloved, and love–between Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

THE LOVING GOD

By Bishop Robert Barron June 15, 2003

Homilies / Reflections – Solemnity of Most Holy Trinity (B)

Commentary

PREACHING PRO-LIFE ON THE FEAST OF THE HOLY TRINITY

Preaching pro-life on the Feast of the Holy Trinity leads us to comment on the reality of “communio”. Seen in a unique way in the Trinity, this is a reality lived on a human level as well. It is first of all a gift, and secondly a task, consisting of a total self-giving to one another. The unity of families, nations, and the world depend on it. As the bulletin insert above indicates, this is a key reason for today’s Feast.

A particular application is in the matter of abortion. There are no two human beings closer than a mother and her unborn child. Abortion disrupts, denies, and distorts the union of these two persons, and in doing so, further destroys family and societal unity. Most marriages break up after an abortion, and the woman often experiences an inability to bond with future children or even enter into future relationships with men. Her ability to trust and to make life decisions is impaired by abortion.

Standing for life and protecting the unborn means fostering the “communio” we see, in its ultimate form, in the Trinity. Life is preserved precisely when it is given away in self-sacrificing love.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: We are blessed to be called God’s chosen people. We bring our needs to the Father who is the source of all goodness.

Deacon/Lector:

That the Church may be faithful to Christ’s command to make disciples of all nations and may flourish throughout the world, we pray to the Lord.

That bishops and priests may work tirelessly to foster within the hearts of the people a strong love for their faith, we pray to the Lord.

That world leaders may work diligently to promote peace among all nations, we pray to the Lord.

That as the Life of the Trinity fills God’s People, they may, as the People of Life, bring about a new respect and protection of every human being’s right to life, we pray to the Lord.

That every member of our parish family may respond generously to sharing their God-given gifts and talents in the work of God’s kingdom, we pray to the Lord.

That those who have died, especially those in the military who gave their lives in service to this country, may experience the everlasting peace of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant:  Heavenly Father, hear and answer the prayers which we place before you this day. We ask these things through your Son Jesus Christ who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God forever and ever.

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

The perfect community

Al Carino

When we go out to others, it means that we are ready to give of ourselves to them rather than to grab what we can from them. In other words, our selfishness, greed and distrust must give way to love — the love that the Three Persons in the Trinity have for each other; the love that Jesus has for us; the love that the Spirit wants to well in us.


Receive the Holy Spirit

Frank Enderle

Our Catholic faith is based on a Trinitarian God who is One. When we were baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, we were called to participate in the life of the Most Holy Trinity here on earth.


Signed by the Trinity

Antonio P. Pueyo

Once we claim our birthright, we also have to live by our obligations us children of God. We cannot claim to be God’s children and act like we belong to the devil.


Being Adopted Makes Us Part of the Family

Jeremiah R. Grosse

This morning’s passage from St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans speaks to us of a relationship brought about by adoption. St. Paul tells that as children of God we did not receive the spirit of slavery which would cause us to fear. Elsewhere in the Scriptures, Jesus tells us that we are called to be His friends, not slaves. Adoption is much more than mere friendship.


A Mysterious Life

Antonio P. Pueyo

There is another approach to understanding the mystery, that is beyond the seeking for rational explanations. It is the way of “entering the mystery” or “living the mystery”. One may not understand it fully, but one engages himself in the consequences of believing the mystery. God is a mystery, but when I believe, then I live in a manner wherein God makes a difference in my life.


Who’s Your Daddy?

Proclaim Sermons

By grace we are all adopted into God’s family.

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

 

Homilies / Reflections – Solemnity of Most Holy Trinity (B)

Commentary

ENCOUNTERING THE TRIUNE GOD

“Hey, it’s Trinity Sunday. Hold onto your hats. We are about to do a deep dive into one of the most complex, wonderful of Christian beliefs…We’re going to talk about God this Sunday called Trinity, not about you,” begins Will Willimon, professor of the Practice of Christian Ministry at Duke Divinity School, acclaimed pastor, and author of over sixty books. Willimon says, “All of this Sunday’s scripture, [John 3:1-17, Romans 8:12-17, Psalm 29, and Isaiah 6:1-8], like most of scripture, depicts people being encountered by God.” What does it mean to be encountered by God? Listen as Willimon explains how “all three, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are aspects of, characteristics of, the truth about the identity and being of the one God who reaches out to us in three ways.

Sermon Writer Homilies

The FOLLOWING SERMONS are from a much larger selection at Sermon Writer website by Richard Niell Donavan, a Disciples of Christ clergyman WHO published it from 1997 until his death in 2020. His wife Dale has graciously kept his website online. A subscription is no longer required. Click on links to read entire sermon.
MATTHEW 28:16-20

A CURIOUS COMMUNITY

By Rev. Amy Butler | Baptist

EXCERPT: Today is Trinity Sunday, the one Sunday of the entire church year when we do not start our Sunday morning consideration with the teachings of Jesus or the words of the scripture text, but with a very difficult teaching of the church: the Doctrine of the Trinity.

You know, God is three in one, but really one even though God is also three?

And hopes for ease of understanding are not buoyed when one cracks open the commentaries and reads opening sentences like: “There are some themes for preaching that are both daunting for the preacher and puzzling for the congregation.”

Or, even when the preacher turns to the timeless writings of Church fathers, like Augustine, who wrote in his great and cumbersome work, The City of God, these helpful statements: “The Father is God.  The Son is God.  The Holy Spirit is God.  The Son is not the Father.  The Father is not the Holy Spirit.  The Holy Spirit is not the Son.”  And, finally: “There is Only One God.”

And some doubted. And you can see why.

See, we believe in a three-in-one God, but the word “trinity” does not occur anywhere in holy scripture, and while there are texts that hint at some kind of Trinitarian doctrine, there’s nothing in all of scripture that defines this essence of God.

It was a guy named Tertullian, an early leader of the church, who actually invented the word “trinity” and the formula we’ve come to understand as our best bet for explaining: three persons, one substance.

Click on title to read entire homily.
MATTHEW 28:16-20

THE BIGGEST ONE OF ALL

By The Rev. David Sellery | Episcopalian

EXCERPT: Our faith is replete with mysteries and wonders. This week we reflect on the biggest one of all. Five brief verses, that’s all we get. It’s a tiny gospel for such a big message… the very nature of God… the Blessed Trinity. We have no MRI images or DNA analysis of the Divinity. So, short of heaven, the word of Jesus is the only clear window we have into the heart of God. It tests our faith and doubtless it was meant to. But Jesus precisely packs so much into every word that it is more than enough for the faithful.

The core of this gospel is a passage that has come to be called The Great Commission. In his final charge to the disciples, Jesus bids them: Go ye therefore and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son; and of the Holy Spirit. Note the significance of the singular. Jesus empowers them in the “name” of God… not in the plural “names” of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. That’s because they are one. God is one… three, yet one.

This mystery is the core belief of Christianity. And Christianity is a faith not a philosophy. We live and act as Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ would have us do… not because some saintly sage has cobbled together a code of conduct to make this a better world. We simply follow God in Christ. And that means we don’t get to call ourselves Christians and then disregard his word. This mystery of the Trinity is not an ornamental attachment to our faith. It is nothing less than the essence of God, as revealed by Christ, himself. So it’s not an option and it’s not up for a vote.

Click on title to read entire homily.
ROMANS 8:14-17

LED BY THE SPIRIT

By Pastor VInce Gerhardy | Lutheran

EXCERPT: Most people can recall a time when they were real brats. This may have happened in their teen years when they constantly questioned the values and attitudes of their parents and teachers. The 1960s were the years that the spirit of rebellion dominated my life, but the 60s and early 70s was also a time when the spirit of rebellion had a grip on society as a whole. Long hair, weird clothes, strange music, drugs, “flower power”, anti-government street marches, anti anything that signified the spirit of the previous generation, highlighted this spirit of rebellion.

We might ask what was new about all of this? The 60s were pretty tame compared to what happens today. That’s true but the spirit of the 60s was so different to what had preceded. The spirit of rebellion took on a new form.

Notice that in my introduction this morning I have referred to “the spirit of rebellion” or the “spirit of the 60s”. The word “spirit” is an interesting one because it needs to be accompanied by the little word “of” o-f “of”. The word “spirit” appears nearly 700 times in the Bible and usually following it there is the word “of”. In the Bible we read about –
spirit of the Lord …
spirit of power …
spirit of life …
spirit of truth …
spirit of this world …
spirit of destruction …
spirit of holiness …
spirit of peace …
spirit of humility …
spirit of jealousy …
spirit of gentleness…

I think you get the point.

Click on title to read entire homily.

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