4th Sunday of Advent, Year C

HOMILIESVIDEO ARCHIVEBISHOP BARRONLIFE ISSUESPOPE FRANCISECUMENICAL
YouTube player

2018 Homily

Fr Austin Fleming, after considers different kinds of images, tales and stories, traditions and myths about Christmas (like elves on shelves) brings our attention to the Child born in a manger.

Fr Austin Fleming, after considers different kinds of images, tales and stories, traditions and myths about Christmas (like elves on shelves) brings our attention to the Child born in a manger.
FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

The Elf on a Shelf

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

There are all kinds of images, tales and stories, traditions and myths about Christmas (like elves on shelves) but the one, the only one truly deserving of our hearts’ attention is the One right here – the Child born in a manger. He is the greatest messenger of all, come from God to us. And he’s not only the messenger – he is, himself, the MESSAGE! He is the WORD made FLESH – for us.

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

DOMINICAN BLACKFRIARS

Taking Part

O.P. | 2021

Advent, especially as it comes to a climax, brings out the sense of God as author, director and he performer of human salvation. The whole narrative and direction are deep and awe-inspiring, the central performance is unique in the presence and power it contains. The denouement through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus is brilliant and breathtaking. And that denouement is not yet complete: there is more to come for he is still to return to fulfil remaining texts and prophecies. Until then, he continues to be present with us, to direct and shape history and to call each person to take a part in the ongoing drama of human history. With such an author, such a director and such a lead actor, let us confidently put ourselves at God’s disposal to take on the unique roles given to each of us in the greatest drama that exists.

RELATED HOMILIES:
Video Reflection (2015)
Recognition and Rejoicing (2012)
Promise and Fulfilment (2009)

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

FR. VINCENT HAWKSWELL

It’s Advent: don’t just do something; stand there!

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

The Mass Readings this Sunday outline what is happening. From Bethlehem shall come forth “one who is to rule in Israel, whose origin is from old, from ancient days.” He is coming not only for Israel, but also for “the rest of his kindred.” He is God the Son, coming among us as a man not to exact the sacrifices and offerings that are God’s due, but to do God the Father’s will: to sacrifice himself so that we can be made holy. His mother is the most blessed of all women. Even an unborn child leaps for joy at the sound of her voice. Let us stop our busy preparations and meditate on Christmas. We have all heard, “Don’t just stand there; do something!” This week, “don’t just do something; stand there!”

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

FR. GEORGE SMIGA

Looking for Christmas

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2003

For children Christmas is a month-long crescendo building to a dramatic climax on Christmas morning. But, for most of us adults, our lives are too complex to sustain that kind of celebration. Fortunately all adults need is a moment, a moment in which the truth breaks through, a moment in which we remember again that God is real, that we are loved, that life is good. Such a moment could happen today, or Christmas morning, or two weeks from now. But whenever it happens, whenever God’s love breaks through, it is then that Christmas will arrive.

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

ABBOT PHILIP LAWRENCE, OSB

Faith is about Listening to the Word…and Believing

Homilies

CHRIST IN THE DESERT MONASTERY | 2015

Faith is about listening to the Word of the Lord and believing that the Word of God is active in our world and transforming our world, even when from all outward appearances, nothing seems to be happening at all. First, for us who follow the Lord, we must allow the Lord to transform us so that we live our lives from His Word.  We must strive to have peace and tranquility and live in mercy at all times.  This can only happen if we allow the Word to have effect in us.  That can only happen if we read the Word and ponder it and allow it go deep within us. Second, as we are transformed, we begin to see that the world is always in crisis and that God does not remake our world because God respects our freedom as humans to do what we want to do.  The brokenness of our world comes from broken people.  The only way to change the world is for us to convert.  And so we have all of the apparitions of Mary, calling for the world to do penance and to convert.  The Mother of God is simply repeating what Jesus preached in His lifetime:  turn away from evil and do God.  Seek the kingdom!

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

FATHER MICHAEL CUMMINS

One Piece of the Puzzle is Enough

DIOCESE OF KNOXVILLE | 2018

In today’s gospel with Mary visiting Elizabeth we see Luke doing something he likes to do throughout his writings – he brings two people together who each have had an experience of God, who each have a piece of the puzzle. The two come together, they each share their story – their piece – and by so doing, they are brought to a greater understanding and awareness. And in this particular encounter there is an even deeper encounter – the infant in Elizabeth’s womb who will be the great prophet leaps in the presence of the Word made flesh in the womb of Mary and shares his prophetic spirit with his mother who then proclaims, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?”

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

Two Women of Courage

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

In the Gospel of Luke the Christmas story begins with two women, Mary and Elizabeth. Today we are presented with these women. One, Mary, is a young girl, perhaps around 16. The other, Elizabeth, is an older lady, perhaps in her fifties. Both are pregnant. The first, Mary, has the Son of God within her. The second, Elizabeth, carries John the Baptist, the last of the Old Testament prophets and the first of the New Testament prophets. Both pregnancies were announced by the angel Gabriel. When Mary hears about Elizabeth’s pregnancy she takes a journey to the hill country to meet her kinswoman. When they meet, today’s Gospel, Elizabeth feels the baby within her stirring. Some of the spiritual writers feel that this is the first time that John pointed to Jesus. Years later, thirty years later, John the Baptist would point to Jesus and say, “Behold the Lamb of God.”

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

MSGR. RUSSELL G TERRA

Technology or God?

Homilies

DIOCESE OF SACRAMENTO | 2021

Our world has turned into a time of almost total technology. The internet has brought near what was, formerly, far away. It has made instantaneous, what, before, took time and waiting. It has made possible many new and wonderful things. However, in many ways, the internet has dehumanized us. Children have been damaged by it in serious ways – People go for a walk in the great outdoors glued to their cell phones – People send damaging text messages they wish they never had sent – And even the best of Skype or Zoom can never be the same as “in person” communication. Usually, when we actively engage another in person, we can read and interpret their emotions. And being able to read those emotions does much to further better communication, understanding, and appreciation.

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

FR. MICHAEL CHUA

Divine Physicality

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

The visitation of Elizabeth by Mary is about bodies: pregnant bodies, a kicking foetus, sounds reaching ears, and mouths speaking. Elizabeth hears and believes and proclaims. Our attention is drawn to her hearing and her speaking. Even the movement of the child within her womb is a revelation. Revelation is communicated to Elizabeth and faith is established in her through physical events: her meeting with Mary, their conversation, John the Baptist leaping in her womb, with the Spirit working through these things. Not just spirit, but spirit and flesh. Likewise in the second reading from Hebrews we are told that Jesus, on coming into the world, is given a body. By presenting Christ’s taking flesh in this way, Hebrews tell us a number of things about the mystery of the Incarnation. They tell us first about the importance of the body, of Christ’s body. Christmas is a very physical affair.

VIEW MORE HOMILIES

FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

Impatient with Process

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

The Gospel story of the Visitation is a wondrous convergence of insignificance and portent. Two cousins greet, one running to assist the other, both pregnant with life and faith. The hidden unborn quickens the triumph of faith in Elizabeth who, despite all appearances, recognizes in Mary the mother of her Lord: “Blessed are you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb. … The moment your greeting sounded in my ears, the baby stirred in my womb for joy.” The secret encounter of these hitherto unknown women announces the future course not only of four lives, but of the world.

FR. EVANS CHAMA, M.AFR

God Remembers Little Ones

SINGLE HUMANITY | 2018

Immediately, Mary hurries to the hilly country of Judea where lives Elizabeth, her cousin. I can imagine Mary embraces Elizabeth vividly, gazing her right in the eyes and say to her: cousin, He has remembered us! Naturally, it’s a song of gratitude that dominates the airwaves.

The Gospel doesn’t go that far, but we know, it’s at this moment when Mary’s joy bursts into a song. Even if she may not have been the composer, even if it may have been sheer initiative of the evangelist; nevertheless, one thing is clear: the canticle suits the occasion, especially as it expresses what these two ladies have lived. Mary evokes God who not only remembers the little ones, but he raises them too.

YouTube player

2018 Homily

Basilica of the National Shrine celebrant & Homilist: Rev. Thomas Kalita; Guest Choir: Saint Peter Parish School Chamber Choir, Olney, MD


Sunday Homilies

DEC 19, 2021 | DEC 23, 2018 | DEC 20, 2015 | DEC 23, 2012 | DEC 20, 2009

HOMILY TRANSCRIPTS

MORE VIDEOS

YouTube player

YouTube player

2021 HOMILY

The Historical Reality of Jesus

Friends, a couple years ago, there was a poll conducted in Great Britain that revealed that the majority of people there feel that Jesus was not a real, historical figure, but rather more of a mythic character. There are all kinds of spiritual systems that trade in mythic language bearing spiritual truths—but that’s not what Christianity is.


Friends, most of us are stuck in the boring and narrow confines of the ego-drama. Mary is not playing an ego-dramatic game; she is playing a theo-dramatic game. We hear of how she sets out “with haste”—the sign of the saints—and it’s because she knows her mission and her purpose in God’s story.


Sunday Podcast Archive
The podcasts on this page are from the archives of Bishop Barron who has been doing them for over 20 years. All of the podcasts below relate to this Sunday Readings.

A NEW DAVID

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 23, 2018

The New Testament authors consistently reached to the Old Testament for their categories of understanding. Hence, Jesus is the Torah in person; the new and definitive Temple; the prophet par excellence; the fulfillment of the covenant; etc. But one of the most important of these Old Testament points of reference is the Mashiach, the anointed one, the Messiah—which is to say, the new David.


MARY, DAVID, AND THE THEO-DRAMA

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 20, 2015

In today’s readings we see the Theo-drama, the great story being told by God, confronting the ego-drama, which is the self-centered play we attempt to write, produce, direct, and star in ourselves. What makes life thrilling is to discover our role in the Theo-drama. This is precisely what has happened to Mary. She found her role—indeed a climactic role—in the Theo-drama, just as King David had several centuries before.


A NEW ARK FOR A NEW COVENANT

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 23, 2012

The greatest and most revered of Israel’s kings was David. It is from the family of David that the Messiah would come into the world and to the surprise of Israel and of the world, the Messiah who is born from the House of David, is the God of Israel himself! Mary, the Mother of God, is therefore to be likened to a new Ark of the Covenant, for in her womb, the God of Israel dwells and makes himself not only Israel’s Messiah, but in wonder of the Incarnation, he becomes for us a new and everlasting covenant.


JOY BEFORE THE ARK OF GOD

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 20, 2009

The image of John the Baptist leaping in joy in the womb of his mother at the sound of the greeting of the Blessed Virgin Mary hearkens back to the Old Testament image of David, leaping and dancing before the Ark of the Covenant. The New Testament is properly understood when one references patterns or events that are described in the Old Testament.


THE INEXHAUSTIBLY FASCINATING FIGURE OF MARY

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 24, 2006

On the final Sunday of Advent, the Church invites us to consider the inexhaustibly fascinating figure of Mary. The Mother of God is a figure of faithful Israel, the people who for so many centuries waited for the coming of the Messiah. She is, accordingly, the new Eve, the new Moses, the true Isaiah and Ezekiel. In meditating upon her, we come to a deeper appreciation of the Christ she bore.


THREE ADVENT LESSONS

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 21, 2003

The readings for the final Sunday of Advent present us with three essential lessons. First, in the Biblical perspective, great things come from the small; second, never ever give up hope; and third, trust always in the power of God. These are the lessons of Micah, Elizabeth, and Mary.

YouTube player
Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the 4th Sunday of Advent, Cycle C. He discusses the meaning of Christmas, the relation between Christmas and Easter, and Jesus begin the work of our redemption starting from the moment on his physical existence in Mary’s womb.
Father Frank Pavone

The Meaning of Christmas

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Mi 5:1-4a
Heb 10:5-10
Lk 1:39-45

Watch a video with homily suggestions

A selection of Advent-Christmas reflections, in general and also related to pro-life themes, can be found at www.priestsforlife.org/preaching/advent-christmas.htm. This material can be helpful for preaching on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

In today’s readings, we see that Christmas is linked to Easter. Christmas is the Feast of the Incarnation (not only of the event of his birth), and Christ takes on a human body precisely so as to offer the sacrifice of that body that saves the world. In fact, his sacrifice is not limited to Calvary. It begins even in the womb. “A body you have prepared for me … I come to do your will.” Even as an embryo, Jesus was offering himself to the Father, in obedience to his will and for our salvation. “A Savior is born for you.” He is a savior precisely because he bears our human nature, and has a human body like we do – a body offered on the cross and in the Eucharist.

As we see in the first reading and the Gospel, the details of his birth are carefully planned by God and foretold by his prophets. His birth is all about hope fulfilled and hope inspired. That hope outlasts his birth, and extends to us today as we work to build a world in harmony with the vision of peace, life, and love that Christmas inspires.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: Like the Virgin Mary, let us pray now, trusting that the Lord’s promises to us will be fulfilled.

Deacon/Lector: 

That the Church of Jesus Christ may always be joyful in proclaiming His coming, we pray to the Lord…

That Christ, the Shepherd of all nations, will guide world leaders and their peoples in the ways of peace and justice, we pray to the Lord…

That as Mary helped Elizabeth, so we may help those who are pregnant to care for their unborn children, we pray to the Lord……

That the sick and the dying may not be neglected by those around them, but loved and strengthened, we pray to the Lord…

That those who have died may be welcomed into the life that never ends, we pray to the Lord…

Celebrant: 

Father, your Son Jesus Christ offered Himself for our sake.
Grant us salvation in Him, who is the answer to all our prayers,
and who is Lord forever and ever. Amen.

Bulletin Insert

The Incarnation

“By his incarnation the Son of God has united himself in some fashion with every human being” (Vatican II, GS 22). This saving event reveals to humanity not only the boundless love of God who “so loved the world that he gave his only Son” (Jn 3:16), but also the incomparable value of every human person. The Church, faithfully contemplating the mystery of the Redemption, acknowledges this value with ever new wonder. She feels called to proclaim to the people of all times this “Gospel”, the source of invincible hope and true joy for every period of history. The Gospel of God’s love for man, the Gospel of the dignity of the person and the Gospel of life are a single and indivisible Gospel” (Pope John Paul II, The Gospel of Life, n.2).

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

God “Needs” Us To Keep His Promises

Al Carino

In the fulfillment of God’s promise in Elizabeth and Mary, we can learn one very important lesson: Salvation does not come from human efforts and merits; it comes exclusively from God’s grace.


Comforting Presence

Antonio P. Pueyo

Many of us are busy people. It seems that the more technology has made travel faster and easier, the less time we have to visit one another. The more sophisticated means of communications are invented, the less meaningful conversations we have.


Son of David and Son of God

Antonio P. Pueyo

Express your appreciation to a person who has touched your life.


The Mother of Life

Thomas J. Euteneuer

Advent is a season that is full of life and there is a very good reason for that – namely, Mary, the one who brings us Life Himself!


A parent is never alone

Tom Bartolomeo

Too many parents have traded away their personal responsibility of their children to hired surrogates. “Dinner’s in the fridge. I have a meeting to go to. See you kids later.” Leave the work of raising children to daycare, to schools and, yes, to church. Nature, however, rebels against such accommodations in our relations to God and family. In greeting his own family and neighbors Jesus pointed to each of us our responsibility: And stretching out His hand toward His disciples, He said, “Behold My mother and My brothers! For whoever does the will of My Father who is in heaven, he is My brother and sister and mother”, Mark 10, 49-50.


The God of Surprise

Douglas P. McManaman

Everything about our faith is a surprise. Although the Messiah was expected, it was not expected that God would join a human nature to himself and dwell among us. That the Messiah was to be a warrior like David was expected, but the surprise is that Christ came to defeat not the Roman Empire, but sin and death through his death. That Jesus would die on a cross was entirely unexpected, even after the disciples were told three times that it will happen. That Jesus rose from the dead was the final surprise. The beginning, middle, and end of his life was one monumental surprise.

LIFEISSUES.NET WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

Please be patient
as page loads

YouTube player
A SERMON FOR EVERY SUNDAY (15:49) – The Rev. MaryAnn McKibben Dana preaches this Sunday’s assigned reading from Luke 1:39-45, sometimes blandly titled: “Mary Visits Elizabeth.” But there is nothing bland about this visit. Mary has just received life changing news from an angel. Dana reminds us that after she hears this news, she flees. But she does not run away, she runs toward. For whatever reason, Mary sets out with haste to Elizabeth’s house. The first words on Elizabeth’s mouth are words of blessing. Are you looking for a blessing right now? Listen and find out how these words of blessing were important to Mary and how they might be important for us too.

RELATED HOMILY: “Gentle Mary, Meek and Mild?” (Rev. Maryann McKibben)


GOSPEL

The Song of Divine Triumph

By The Rev. Charles Hoffacker, Episcopalian

The problem is not with classics or pop tunes or commercial jingles. The problem is when we ignore how The Magnificat is not just Mary’s song and it is not only about Jesus; somehow it proclaims God’s hope and purpose for us.

Mary’s song is our song. We can live in a way that magnifies and rejoices in the Lord. We can do this by the grace of her Son, our Brother. The song that turned out true in his life can turn out true in ours as well.

May we sing The Magnificat with our lives. May it become our legacy to our children and all who come after us. When our final hour arrives, may we hear this song of divine triumph sounding in our hearts and ringing all around us and know it as our own. For the God who kept faith with Abraham, and Mary, and Jesus, and every past generation keeps faith with us as well.


CLICK on titleS TO READ ENTIRE SERMON
SOURCE: Sermon Writer – All Rights Reserved | © 1997-2020 Richard Niell Donovan; Video added by SermonPrep.org

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *