34th Sunday of Year B

BLOGSVIDEO HOMILIESBISHOP BARRONLIFE ISSUESTHE HOLY SEE

In the gospel for today’s Feast of Christ the King (Jn. 18:33b-37) we are given the humble and patient God, writes Father Cummins.
FR. VINCENT HAWKSWELL

TO EVANGELIZE, WE MUST KNOW OUR FAITH

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

Last Week’s Homily: No homily available for this week. 

Jesus calls all the baptized to evangelize and spread the Gospel. This homily is the first in a series of three following the recent Upper Room evangelization event. 

“God made us to know him, love him, and serve him in this world and to be happy with him forever in the next,” says The Penny Catechism. He calls us to share in his own life “by knowledge and love,” says the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Notice: knowledge and love.

Of these two, “love of God is immeasurably more important,” said author Frank Sheed. In fact, says the Catechism, the teaching of the doctrine “must be directed to the love that never ends.”

FR. GEORGE SMIGA

THE ARC OF THE UNIVERSE

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2018

We all have a personal history. Then there is scientific history, and economic history, and American history, and world history. But above all of these we believe that there is God’s history, and that that history is supreme. This is why we can make the claim that we make today that Jesus Christ is the King of the Universe. There is a very helpful image in today’s second reading from the Book of Revelation that centers on this point. God says, “I am the Alpha and the Omega.” Alpha and Omega are the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet. So, God is saying: I am the A and the Z. I am the beginning and the end of time.

We do not have much problem believing that God is the beginning of time. We accept God as the Creator of all things. But sometimes we forget that God is also the Omega, the end of time. This is an important truth to remember because it gives us optimism and hope. By seeing God as the Omega, the end of history, we are saying that everything that happens to us and everything that happens in our world is moving towards a point where God will be all in all. It is telling us that every step we take in history is a step towards God. It indicates that because we believe in the resurrection of Jesus, we see ourselves approaching a moment where God’s goodness and justice will rule over all things.

More Homilies by Fr. Smiga

  • Belonging to the Truth (2003)
  • Choosing Your Kingdom (2006
  • Real Power (2009)
  • The World As God Sees It (2012)
  • Claiming Our True Name (2015)
FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

TO WHOM, TO WHAT, DO YOU PLEDGE YOUR ALLEGIANCE?

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

We Americans are a people whose nation was born in response to, and as a rejection of, not only a particular king
but of monarchy in general as a way of governing people. We are citizens of our country, not subjects of its leaders. Ours is a government understood to be of the peopleby the people and for the people. So this political stance poses a curious question for American Christians who celebrate today the feast of Christ – the King.

The gospel today gives us Jesus declaring that his kingdom isn’t here – it’s somewhere else – and yet he claims to have dominion over all the rulers and peoples of all the nations of the world. How are we to understand and celebrate this in our culture? Certainly what the scriptures tell us about the Lord is at least as true as what we believe about our nation and its government. Are the two powers in conflict?  Many times, they are. Can the two live together, subsist in the same people? Can I call myself a faithful Christian and a faithful American without contradicting myself? I hope and pray and believe I can.

ABBOT PHILIP LAWRENCE, OSB

DO YOU BELONG TO JESUS?

Homilies

CHRIST IN THE DESERT MONASTERY | 2018

The words kingdom, dominion, king, ruler and such types of words help us understand that others can dominate or guide our lives.  We humans are social beings and belong to social groupings.  We may live in a town or a city; we might participate in various groups; we may have smaller or larger families.  All of these groupings indicate some kind of tie to people outside of ourselves.  None of us is alone in the world except by our own choosing.  And even then, if we choose to be alone, we are still related in various ways.

The challenge of the Solemnity of Christ the King is to belong to Jesus.  Belonging to Jesus does not cut us off from belonging to others but gives direction to that belonging.  Perhaps too often today we make our social belonging more important than belonging to Jesus and thus our faith is weak.  The invitation today is to make our belong to Jesus, our being part of the dominion of Jesus, the Kingdom of Jesus, the most important aspect of our life and all the other belongings that we may have only in terms of belonging to Jesus.

FATHER MICHAEL CUMMINS

THE HUMBLE AND PATIENT KING

DIOCESE OF KNOXVILLE | 2015

Today, we as Church, proclaim Christ is King yet, like Pilate, our understanding and idea of this title is often limited.  It is interesting to note on this Feast of Christ the King that our Lord, himself, never took on the title of “king”.  Even on this most final and bitter of stages; when the fallen pride of our human condition would eagerly grasp onto a title of assertion to throw back into the face of the powers of this world (how often we see this exalted on our movie screens in the myth of redemptive violence) our Lord chooses a different path.  “You say I am king.  For this I was born and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth.  Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.”

Our Lord rejects the title “king” and by so doing he forswears the fallen world and all it has to offer – self-indulgent pride, sad divisions and triumphalism and all forms of violence.  Our Lord chooses a different path – the path of humility.  “For this I was born and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth.  Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.”  

MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

THY KINGDOM COME

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

Jesus said, “My Kingdom is not of this world.”  What was, what is his Kingdom? Up until a few centuries ago, no one could imagine a government that was not ruled by a king, queen or some sort of emperor.  Some people have a difficult time understanding today’s celebration because they see it as seeking an end of democracy and a return to monarchy.  That is not the case.  When we pray Thy Kingdom Come we are not concerned with any form of government.  When we pray Thy Kingdom Come we are focusing on God having absolute power in our world.

So we pray Thy Kingdom come. We say this so often that we skim through the words. We hardly notice them.  Nor do we reflect on what we are asking for when we say Thy Kingdom Come.  What do we mean by this prayer?  Do we really want this prayer answered?  What are we doing to bring about the Kingdom of God?

I often ask people to consider these questions when they come to receive the sacrament of penance.  I want to go into these at a greater depth.

FR. MICHAEL CHUA

THY KINGDOM COME

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

The most familiar Catholic prayer that we’ve been taught from young is the Pater Noster, the very prayer our Lord taught His disciples. Right after addressing God as Father and affirming the holiness of His name, we make this petition: “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” (Matt 6:10). I strongly believe that few truly understand the intent and gravity of this simple petition. It pleads with God to act, to enter into our circumstances and to bring about His reign. It hopes for the day when God would end war, bring good news to the poor, bind the brokenhearted, proclaim liberty to captives, bring justice to the oppressed, comfort the mourning, create a new heaven and a new earth, and gather all the nations to worship Him.

But the Lord’s Prayer guides us through a world where ideal seems different from reality, where heaven and earth can seem really far apart. Wars are still fought. The poor still experience injustice. The broken-hearted still suffer. People are still captive to sin, death, the devil. We live in a world that either sees no need for God or is callously indifferent to His existence. But, despite our everyday experiences, the Church continues to proclaim as she did from the very beginning until the very end of time, that our Lord is King. She continues to proclaim confidently that our Lord Jesus Christ reigns, and because He reigns as King of the Universe, death is a defeated foe, sin is being subdued, the hearts of the broken-hearted are being bound up, the poor are hearing the good news, justice is coming to the oppressed, communities and individuals who mourn are being comforted, the new heavens and new earth are being re-created. Of course, in the midst of gloom, it is hard to perceive any of this. Is God’s Kingdom still an unfulfilled and distant dream? Well, today’s gospel reminds us that His Kingdom is not of this world and it can only be perceived by those who do not belong to this world.

FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

THE KING’S STANDARD

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

Not every image of kingliness is pleasant. Even in better times for royalty, kings have been associated with opulence, money, and reckless appetite. They were distant and unapproachable, high and mighty surrounded by sycophant and jester. Most strutted through time, decked in finery, decorated with trappings and trimmings of grand lordliness. It was the uncommon king who did otherwise.

King imagery is more problematic today, not only because of widespread suspicion of hierarchy and masculine dominance (a lordly word, that). We are also not likely to be drawn to chivalrous virtues. Notions like honor, obedience, duty, and loyalty vex anyone whose highest value is individualism. We love our autonomy. We celebrate choice because it is ours. Doing the will of someone else is another matter.

FR. EVANS CHAMA, M.AFR

YOU ARE MY KING; IT’S MY CHOICE!

SINGLE HUMANITY | 2018

As usual, the Liturgical year ends with the solemnity: Christ the King of the Universe. What message does this feast have for us? How does it illumine both our world and our personal lives today, especially regarding our fundamental choices?

There’s a history behind this feast. It’s significance however does not lie in the past, but rather, in the manner it speaks to us today. The feast was declared by pope Pius XI, in 1925, when world leaders, especially in Europe, were not only competing for power but also claimed absolute power, especially by the tendency to rule without God.  They wanted to run their show. So, the declaration of this feast was a way of counteracting such human pride. (For more on the history, please, click following link: Homily For Solemnity of Christ the King, year C). Surely, today most those dictatorial regimes have given way to democracy; yet, the message of this feast remains pertinent. How?

Fr. Chama’s homily is divided into the following sections:

  • Christ the King, the feast in our time
  • Auto-determination, logic of democratic regime
  • “I” mirrored in “we”
  • What next then?
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Celebrant & Homilist: Msgr. Kevin Hart Guest Choir: Resurrection Catholic Church, Burtonsville, MD

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HOMILY TRANSCRIPTS

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Sunday Podcast Archive

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO SAY THAT CHRIST IS KING?

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 25, 2018 .

The liturgical year ends with the feast of Christ the King. This day reminds us what the Christian thing is all about: that Jesus really is the king, the Lord of our lives; that we belong utterly to him; and that we can say, with St. Paul, “It is no longer I who live but Christ who lives in me.”


TRUE KINGSHIP

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 25, 2012 .

At the end of the liturgical year, we celebrate the feast of Christ the King. But Christ’s kingship is different from any with which we’re familiar – his kingdom “does not belong to this world.” His kingship doesn’t demand violence, but truth. Following him brings us closer to God’s grace.


THERE’S A NEW KING IN TOWN

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 22, 2009

Christ’s kingship cannot be properly understood outside Israel’s expectations for the Messiah. Jesus of Nazareth fulfills these expectations, yet in surprising and unexpected ways.


FEAST OF CHRIST THE KING

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 23, 2003

The final Sunday of the Liturgical year is dedicated to Christ the King. One of the earliest forms of Christian proclamation was “Jesus is Lord.” This was meant to be provocative, since Caesar was customarily described as Lord of the world. The first Christians were saying that Jesus is the one who must in every sense command, direct, and order our lives. Is Jesus truly the King of your life? That’s the hard question which this feast raises.

Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the Feast of Christ the King, Year B. Fr. Frank notes that the readings are all about the dominion of Christ as King. This is where the Church’s teaching on the right to life is based.
Father Frank Pavone

CHRIST’S DOMINION OVER HUMAN LIFE

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Dn 7:13-14
Rv 1:5-8
Jn 18:33b-37

Watch a Video with Homily Hints

Two ways of approaching the theme of the sanctity of life on the Feast of Christ the King are to approach it in the light of Christ’s dominion over human life, and in the light of his victory over sin and death.

Christ’s Kingship is all about his dominion. All of today’s readings reflect that. The ultimate question in the debate over abortion and euthanasia is a debate about dominion. It’s not so much a question of when human life begins or ends, but a question of to whom it belongs. The only answer in the light of the Word of God and the Kingship of Christ is that human life belongs to God – not only because he made it, but because he redeemed it in Christ. Dr. James McMahon was an abortionist in Southern California and performed partial-birth abortions. When asked by the American Medical Association news how he justified doing it, he admitted that the baby was a child, but then said there was a more important question, “Who owns the child? It’s got to be the mother,” he explained. This idea that some people own others, though rejected long ago in the slavery debate, resurfaces in the abortion debate, and flatly contradicts the Kingship of Christ and the dominion he exercises over human life.

He is King also because he has conquered the power of evil. The Alpha and the Omega lives and reigns before all other life came to be, and after all death will be destroyed. He holds the keys of death and has robbed it of its power. In the light of that victory, we who work to build the Culture of Life are really proclaiming a Kingdom that has already been established in place of the kingdom of death. That vanquished kingdom still echoes through the land – through evils like abortion – but no longer has the final word. Our culture can be delivered from its power because Christ has already accomplished that delivery – we simply have to announce and apply it, through the many facets of the ministry of the Church and the pro-life movement.

This Kingship over evil manifests itself in us when, despite powerful temptations (such as those that afflict a person tempted to abort a child), we can and do choose what is right and good – we always have the power to choose life, no matter what the circumstances.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: As we await the fulfillment of God’s kingdom in glory, let us offer our prayers to our Almighty Father.

Deacon/Lector: 

That the Church, the communion of saints growing together in holiness, may be a reflection of the heavenly kingdom on earth, we pray to the Lord.

That the pope, bishops, and all Church leaders may reflect God’s truth and love to the world by the integrity of their lives, we pray to the Lord.

That all nations may honor Christ the King as the only Lord and giver of Life, and in His name, abolish the practice of abortion and euthanasia, we pray to the Lord.

That as our nation observes Thanksgiving, we may renew our sense of dependence upon God for our freedom, our security, and for all we need, we pray to the Lord.

That parents may strive to be good role models for their children, and that youth may be open to God’s call to priesthood and religious life, we pray to the Lord.

That those who have died may come to share in the heavenly banquet with Mary and all the saints, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant: Heavenly Father, we ask your continued blessings on our community.  May You always reign in our hearts and in our midst so that we may reflect your love to all people.  We ask this in the name of the only Savior and King, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Bulletin Insert

Consistent Ethic of Life 

“The meaning of a consistent ethic is to say in the Catholic community that our moral tradition calls us beyond the split so evident in the wider society between moral witness to life before and after birth. Does this mean that everyone must do everything? No! There are limits of time energy and competency. There is a shape to every individual vocation. People must specialize, groups must focus their energies. The consistent ethic does not deny this” (Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, Address at Seattle University, March 2, 1986).

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

Christ – A King as no other

Al Carino

The Feast of Christ the King allows us to reflect on two basic questions which have grave implications in our lives: Is Christ really king? If so, what kind of King is He?


Kingly Ambitions

Antonio P. Pueyo

Blessed Charles the Foucauld who spent his ministry among poor desert people chose to follow Jesus because no one else could be lower. Jesus chose the lowest place and nobody could take it away from him.


My Words Will Not Pass Away

Douglas P. McManaman

No merely human words can impart divine life. When heaven and earth pass away, all human wisdom, all art, literature, all human achievement will pass away with it. But Christ’s words are different. His words endure, they are eternal, they contain the seeds of eternal life, and so all who feed on his words bring into themselves something eternal.


Inside the world of the walking dead

Tom Bartolomeo

Summary: “What is truth” – real truth? He is Jesus Christ, “the way, the truth and the life.” Only his “truth . . . will free us” from this world or the world of the walking dead, John 8, 32. Pilgrim, we celebrate his kingdom at his death and God willing at our own deaths for this reason. Anyone here believe he will live forever? So why do so many act as if they were going to live here forever? That would be hell. Pilgrim, were you born for his kingdom? Then follow his way, truth and life. He is the only truth which will free us from the world outside.

<href=”http://www.lifeissues.net/”>Lifeissues.net WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

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