32nd Sunday of Year B

BLOGSFEATUREDVIDEO HOMILIESBISHOP BARRONLIFE ISSUES

Like a father who gives only good things to his children, God wants to provide everything we need. Sin occurs when we fail to trust in his goodness and disobey him, writes Father Hawkswell. (Adobe)
FR. VINCENT HAWKSWELL

WE CAN TRUST GOD FOR OUR HAPPINESS

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

This Sunday, we pray “that we may hasten without stumbling” to “receive” what God has “promised.”

We call it heaven: the ultimate fulfillment of our deepest longings, the state of supreme, definitive happiness. The Bible describes it as life, light, peace, paradise, a wedding feast, the Father’s house, the heavenly Jerusalem. However, “eye has not seen, ear has not heard, nor has it so much as dawned on man what God has prepared for those who love him.”

Imagine an adult trying to tell a small child the delights of marriage. The greatest pleasure the child knows comes from chocolate. Told that eating chocolate is not part of conjugal pleasure, he characterizes marriage as fasting from chocolate. He is familiar with chocolate; he cannot even begin to imagine a pleasure that overwhelms it.

In heaven, we will see that God himself is “the goal of our desires,” St. Augustine said; “we shall contemplate him without end, love him without surfeit, praise him without weariness.”

FR. GEORGE SMIGA

PLACE THE WORD ON YOUR HEART

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2006

Jewish rabbis take the bible very seriously. Because they believe it is God’s word they are convinced that nothing in the bible is there by chance. Every word, every expression, every comma has a significance. On one occasion two rabbinical students were discussing a passage from the book of Deuteronomy. They were trying to understand why God commanded us in that book to put the word of God on our hearts. Why did God not say to put God’s word in our hearts? Is not that where the word of God should be? Since they could not figure this out, they went to ask the rabbi why does the bible say we are to place the word of God on our hearts instead of in our hearts? This was his response: “We are commanded to place the word of God on our hearts because our hearts are closed and the word of God cannot get in. So God commands us to place the word of God on our hearts. And there it sits there it waits. It waits for the day when our hearts will be broken. When they are broken, then the word of God will fall gently inside.”

FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

JESUS CONDEMNS THOSE WHO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE POOR

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

There’s quite a contrast in the two brief vignettes St. Mark pairs, side by side, in today’s gospel. First, a stern Jesus, mincing no words, condemns the scribes who take advantage of their office and of the poor for their own benefit and satisfaction. And then a compassionate Jesus directs our attention to a poor widow – from precisely the class of people the scribes are accused of scamming – a poor widow whose small offering Jesus compares with the larger contributions made to the temple by the wealthy.

Mark offers a description of the scribes. And it concerns me that I fit that description rather well. As a priest, I am among those who wear long robes. I accept the greetings of many as I walk each day through the market place of Concord center. I have a seat of honor here in the temple. And when I go to a reception or a banquet I’m almost always seated at the head table. In my defense – I do not devour the homes of widows! And we’re usually out of here in an hour – so I don’t think that’s lengthy prayers…

ABBOT PHILIP LAWRENCE, OSB

TRUST GOD COMPLETELY

Homilies

CHRIST IN THE DESERT MONASTERY | 2018

Jesus expects us to trust Him completely. Many of us are not quite so sure that we can trust Him, even though we want to trust Him. The widow in the first reading shows us how a person can trust completely, even to the point of giving up the little one has for another person. The Gospel of Mark today repeats that message with the story of the poor widow who gave all she had, trusting in the Lord. The challenge today: Will I trust? Will I give up what I have because I trust in the Lord?

The first reading is from the First Book of Kings and gives us stories about the Prophet Elijah. Elijah is a wonderful person in the Old Testament. Elijah trusts so completely that he always does what God asks of him, even when it puts his own life in danger. Elijah can complain to God because Elijah has such a close relationship with God and thus shares everything with God. This is part of the challenge for us today: trust and become close! When God does not give us what we think we need, we are free to tell God that we still need what we are asking for. We must have confidence will always give us what we truly need….

MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

TRUSTING IN GOD

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

In the first reading today and in the Gospel reading we meet two widows who are very similar.  Both are common, hard working women.  Both are poor.  Both put their trust in God rather than in things.  Both are rewarded for their faith.

The first widow is a foreigner to the Hebrews.  She is from Zarephath, a coastal city on the Mediterranean, northwest of the Kingdom of Israel.  Elijah traveled through this land during a famine.  As in all famines, the rich complain and the poor starve.  The woman was poor.  When Elijah met up with her, she was putting her last scraps together before she and her son would die.  Imagine her as a starving woman with her child in Africa or Asia, eyes sunken with pain, belly extended.  Imagine that desperation had given way to despair  and a moribund acceptance of her fate and that of her son.  We have all seen pictures of starving women, holding a suffering child…

FR. MICHAEL CHUA

GOD IS WATCHING

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

As Catholics, we shouldn’t always take the Bible literally, but we should always take it seriously. To take the story of the Widow’s Mite seriously, we must keep the condemnation in the story. This story is meant to confront us, but it has, repetitively, been interpreted to condemn others or in a limited way, to highlight the virtue of generous giving. Catholic priests jump at the opportunity to use this passage to highlight the need for Catholics in the pew to give more. The collection usually increases this Sunday, but just this Sunday only! Unfortunately, it usually returns to previous levels the following week, exposing a very Catholic phenomena – Catholics usually give out of guilt, not out of passion or commitment. But the character of the poor widow being held up as a model for generous giving is secondary to the condemnation which precedes and follows this episode.

FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

WHEN THERE SEEMS NOTHING LEFT

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

There are times when we are down, and we think we have nothing left to give. Little remains in the barrel of our lives. Then, for some reason, we still manage to give more out of the nothing we have left. And grace is born again.

How often the mere pennies of others replenish us. It happens in those moments when someone seems to have nothing much to give us: no education, no program, no sermon, no sound advice, no solution to our problems. If they do not give up on us, but give us something else, if they give not from their surplus, but all they have to live on, we find that they have offered their very being. Their presence. Their hearts. What they bestow on us, finally, is no merely human asset, but the life of God flourishing in our faith, hope, and love.

FR. EVANS CHAMA, M.AFR

STRONG ENOUGH TO STAND IN THE TRUTH

SINGLE HUMANITY | 2018

The word of God shakes us out of the slumber of fears and illusions so that, liberated from a Pharisee in us, we can experience the joy of being loved unconditionally. Then, we can have the courage to present ourselves as we are. There’s no higher form of generosity than when we become strong enough to stand before others, unarmoured, in the light of truth. Let’s see what this means.

The first part of the gospel text for this Sunday we have Jesus denounce the behaviour of Pharisees. In the second part he praises a widow in the temple who offers generously the little she has for her survival. What a combination! I wonder the inspiration of such arrangement. That’s why, to bypass the embarrassment of commenting the apparently unrelated parts, I wanted to take only the short version of the reading, thus, leaving out the part about Pharisees. In that way, it would be a lot easier handling related stories about widows, in the First Reading and in the Gospel. However, after a little reflection I realise that these distant parts may actually have a big story to tell.

Fr. Chama’s homily is divided into the following sections:

  • So, let’s dare
  • A plea in favor of Pharisees
  • See how religious I am!
  • Look how strong I am!
  • Indeed, the truth will set you free
Cardinal Tagle

THE POOR ARE IMPORTANT TO GOD

SOURCE: THE WORD EXPOSED (2018)
The Pittsburgh Oratory

EXTRAORDINARY ACTS OF GENEROSITY

SOURCE: Homily Archive

Homily for the Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time preached by Father Stephen Lowery, C.O. at The Pittsburgh Oratory.

Washington Archdiocese

ARE WE GIVING QUANTITY AND QUALITY TO GOD IN OUR PRAYER LIFE?

Fr. Larry Swink, Pastor of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in La Plata, MD talks about what he’s planning for this weekend’s homily.

SOURCE: SUNDAY GAME PLAN (2018)
CLARET MEDIA CAMEROON

GIVING FROM OUR HEARTS!

READ TRANSCRIPT

A saying goes that “Wrapped in love, the tiniest gift becomes a treasure”. This entails that an offering is never too small when it is given from the heart. When you offer anything in love it will never be too small. This is so because the biggest gift is the one given from your heart. The readings of today present us with two widows who teach us that we must give from our hearts whether we are rich or poor!

When the books of Old Testament refer to the poor they often list three categories of people: the stranger, the orphan and the widow (Deut 14:29). The Hebrew Scriptures constantly invite people to be sensitive to the needs of these three types of vulnerable people: the stranger, the orphan and the widow (Ps 94:6; Jer 7:11).

At a time of scarcity, Prophet Elijah, as recounted in the First Reading of today, instead of helping the widow, requests help from her. The poor widow generously offers the prophet the last bit of food that she had. The Lord God blesses her generosity, abundantly: “The jar of meal was not spent nor the jug of oil emptied” (1Kings 1:16). The widow chose to do the virtuous thing. She gave that which she really needed. She gave from her need, all for a Greater Need, for the Need for God. And God rewarded her as she and her son survived the drought and famine.

The Gospel also presents us with the example of a widow from which the English word ‘widow’s mite’ has become popular. Jesus is sitting in the Temple with his disciples, in the area where people made donations to the Temple. Some would come with large sums of money and made sure that others would see them. The widow by putting her two little coins gave from what she herself really needed, but caring for God’s house meant more to her than her own needs. She had a Greater Need, the Need for God in her life.

God first, then the rest! Here is what the Lord wants: “Seek you first the Kingdom of heaven and its justice, and all the remainder will be given to you”. Isn’t our God provident? This truth as we see was tried out by the widow. We see in her the attitude of total abandonment to divine providence, responsibility and freedom, certain that God will provide. In fact this eloquent attitude expresses the faith as total dependence on God. This we must understand it once and for all if we want to gain salvation.

A question that we can all ask ourselves then is: what is it that I am still holding on to – that prevents me from totally surrendering myself to God? The widow’s gift dripped rich in meaning because “she has given everything she has.” In other words, she gave from her heart. Jesus is emphasizing that our gifts have meaning and impact based on the way they are given, not merely based on their size.

SOURCE:Homily Archive
John Michael Talbot

WE NEED TO BE GIVING THE GIFT OF OURSELVES TO OTHERS

SOURCE: Year Cycle B – Sunday Gospel Reflections (2018)
BASILICA OF THE NATIONAL SHRINE

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Celebrant & Homilist: Msgr. Kevin Hart; Guest Choir: Resurrection Catholic Church, Burtonsville, MD

Sunday Homilies

NOV 7, 2021 | NOV 11, 2018 | NOV 8, 2015 | NOV 11, 2012 | NOV 8, 2009

HOMILY TRANSCRIPTS

MORE VIDEOS

Friends, a connection with God leads to life and flourishing. When we sever that connection, we experience a drought similar to the one in our first reading today. The Lord responds to our needs, so trust in his providence, and he will not abandon you.

Sunday Podcast Archive

A TALE OF TWO WIDOWS

by Bishop Robert Barron  November 11, 2018 .

Today’s Scriptures highlight two widows and two very important biblical principles: God reveals himself precisely at that moment of our greatest vulnerability and need, and the grace in your life will increase in the measure that you give it away.


CHRIST THE HIGH PRIEST

by Bishop Robert Barron  November 12, 2006

For the past several weeks, we have been reading from the extraordinary letter to the Hebrews, the principal theme of which is the priesthood of Jesus Christ. Jesus can be the ultimate bridge-builder between God and us, precisely because in his own person he reconciles divinity and humanity. True God and true man, Christ is true priest.


Recent Podcasts

Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the 30th Sunday of Year B.
Father Frank Pavone

THE TALE OF TWO WIDOWS

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Watch a video with homily hints

1 Kgs 17:10-16
Heb 9:24-28
Mk 12:38-44 or 12:41-44

Today’s readings bring us a “tale of two widows,” both of whom gave when they had every human reason not to. The widow in the first reading prepared something for Elijah although she didn’t have enough for herself and her son. The widow in the Gospel passage gave all her savings.

The Lord’s prophet reassured the first widow; the Lord himself praised the second.

We, the Church, are not widowed. The Bridegroom is with us, and it is from him that we draw the courage to be generous – not just with food and money, but with our witness to the Gospel, and with our taking of risks for building a world of justice and a culture of life. Some feel that they have enough “business to mind” with their own lives, and therefore don’t want to get involved in the lives of others who, for example, are facing the temptation to abort a child. “I have enough problems of my own” is the common temptation. It seems that we barely have enough energy and attention to give our own problems, let alone those of others.

Yet this is precisely where the lesson of the widow’s mite comes in. It applies more to this than to how much money we give away. The human heart expands when it touches God, and it expands to take in the needs, the “business,” of every vulnerable human being. We no longer measure our giving by how much we have; we measure it by how much the other needs. Then, like the miracle that surprised the widow whom Elijah visited, we find our capacity for love and concern is greater than we imagined.

We also carefully measure our risk, and are tempted to say that we’ve quickly reached the limit of how much we are willing to risk. But the demands of justice, and of the protection of life, require that we measure our risk not against how many other things we may lose, but against what the victim of injustice stands to lose. In fighting for the unborn, we are defending those who are losing their very lives – and therefore all the goods and rights they might possess in life. What we risk losing for defending them is little to nothing in comparison. The lesson of the widow’s mite applies again. Indeed, the tale of the two widows is simply a reflection of the fundamental teaching, “Greater love than this no one has, than to lay down his life for his friends.”

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant:  Acknowledging that God is the giver of all that is good, we place our needs before his throne.

Deacon/Lector:

That the Church may be a witness to the world of true faithfulness to the message of the Gospel, we pray to the Lord.

That the pope, bishops, priests and deacons may continue to preach the Gospel with courage and zeal, we pray to the Lord.

That all who hold public office may seek trustworthy guidance from the Holy Spirit in all matters great and small, we pray to the Lord…

That as we look forward to the coming of Christ, we may actively build a world that seeks justice and respects life at every stage, we pray to the Lord.

That all who are sick and suffering may be restored to health and wholeness according to the will of God, we pray to the Lord.

That those who have died may be united with the glorified saints in heaven, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant: God our Creator, you bless us with abundant life.  Hear the prayers of your grateful servants and answer us in the name of Jesus, who is Lord forever and ever.  Amen.

Bulletin Insert

Rededication to the Cause of Life

“In this Pastoral Plan for Pro-Life Activities: A Campaign in Support of Life we renew our call for individual Catholics and the many institutions and organizations of the Church to unite in an unprecedented effort to restore respect and legal protection for every human life—to be what the Holy Father asks us to be: a people of life and a people for life (The Gospel of Life, no. 78). It is our hope and expectation that in focusing on the need to respect and protect the lives of the innocent unborn and those who are disabled, ill, or dying, we will help to deepen respect for the life of every human being.” (US Bishops, 2001).

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

God Loves A Generous Giver

Al Carino

We have modern versions of the Scribes and Pharisees. Today, when some people give to charity, they call for a press conference so that the whole world would know of their generosity. Not so with the followers of Jesus. We are to give in secret and for no other reason but to be of help to a brother or sister, in need.


Giving Till It Hurts

Antonio P. Pueyo

Nature shows us the way. A well that is unused becomes stagnant. A well from which water is often drawn remains fresh.


Generosity

Antonio P. Pueyo

If the poor can give out of their meager resources, so much more should the wealthier ones share what they can. Giving is making sacrifices. Only the giver really knows how much sacrifice he is making. And God, who sees the heart.


Our lives are in rehearsal for Christ’s second coming

Tom Bartolomeo

Jesus calls all of us, would cast all of us in his eternal peace and glory. Our lives are in rehearsal for Christ’s second coming. Lord, may we all be ready. For “many are called but few are chosen”. Lord, help our unbelief.

<href=”http://www.lifeissues.net/”>Lifeissues.net WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

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