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30th Sunday of Year B

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year BFirst Reading: Jer 31:7-9Second Reading: Heb 5:1-6Gospel Reading: Mk 10:46-52 This Sunday’s Readings show that God is compassionate: he wants to save us. …
FATHER VICENT HAWKSWELL

GOD ALLOWS RE-TESTS BECAUSE HE WANTS US TO BE SAVED

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

This Sunday’s Readings show that God is compassionate: he wants to save us. Unfortunately, what Jesus said about hell makes many people think that God delights in punishment; the commandments make them think that God, and the Catholic Church, deliberately make salvation difficult.

For example, said Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, they think that the Church, “with all her commandments and prohibitions,” turns love to bitterness, stopping us just when it offers us a “foretaste of the divine.”

No. Hell means separation from God. It is not an arbitrary punishment for sin, as when a parent stops a child’s allowance because he did not tidy his room. Rather, it is the natural consequence of sin, as when a student has to repeat a course because he has neglected his studies.

Fr. Michael Chua

KEEP GOING, DON’T STOP

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

Today, the gospel presents us with the familiar story of the healing of the blind man, Bartimaeus. It is an important story because it is the last healing miracle to be recorded by St Mark in his gospel and it comes after Jesus’ triple prediction of His passion, death and resurrection, and at the end of the lessons given by our Lord to his disciples on the theme of discipleship. Thus, the story of Bartimaeus serves as a conclusion to our Lord’s catechesis on both His mission and that of His disciples. The clue to understanding this story is found at the end, where our Lord names faith as what impels Bartimaeus. The rest of the story shows us what that faith is.

Bartimaeus alone grasps who Jesus is. So far, no one else in Mark has been able to perceive so much about Jesus from so little data. The title Bartimaeus uses, “Son of David,” appears only here in Mark. It is a Messianic title (earlier, St Peter had identified our Lord as the Messiah, but his understanding fell short of Jesus’ mission and role).

FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

“LORD, I WANT TO SEE!”

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

As you can plainly see, I have corrected vision.
I can, of course, see without my glasses –
but without them I don’t see very well:
I don’t see very clearly and what I do see is out of focus.
In fact, I wear tri-focals and I wear them all the time:
one third of my lens helps me see you and things at a distance,
another third helps me read a computer screen or newspaper;
and another third helps me read a book sitting on the altar
or my homily here at the ambo.

But even with my glasses on,
I can still make the prayer of Bartimaeus my own:
Lord, I want to see!”

I can pray as Bartimaeus prayed
because I know that my vision,
in many important ways,
needs even more correction than my glasses offer me.
I can pray as Bartimaeus did because I know how often
my inner vision is unclear, blurry, out of focus.
You might say that sometimes my inner vision

MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

SOME STORIES OF TRUST

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

In the light of the baseball season in the middle of the playoffs, I thought I’d begin with a little story that combines sports and one of the themes of today’s Gospel.

There was an elderly lady named Miss Nancy Jones, who lived in a small Midwestern community. She had the notoriety of being the oldest resident of the town.  She was well into her nineties.  No one knew of a time that she wasn’t in the town.  But no one really knew her.  She was very much a loner.  She wouldn’t let anyone know her.    She didn’t want to bet be bothered with people.  She felt it was just too risky.  You can get hurt when you deal with people,  you know.  She would do her shopping, and talk to as few people as possible.  She rarely opened her door for anyone.  Sometimes people left her a note inviting her to Thanksgiving Dinner, or a Church social or something, but she would just ignore the invitation.  Well, one day someone noticed that her newspapers had piled up on her doorstep.  He called the police to investigate, and, sadly, they found that poor old Miss Jones died.  

RELATED HOMILIES

FR. GEORGE SMIGA

LIVING A SECOND TIME AROUND

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2003

What if you could live your life over?  What if you had a second chance to live life again?  What would you change?  What you keep the same?  Or to put it terms of today’s gospel, what would you want to see differently?

The cry of Bartimaeus in today’s gospel is “Lord, I want to see.” If that cry were to become true for you, what would you want to see?  Father William Bausch in a beautiful essay on the Bartimaeus story suggests that there are three things we would want to see differently: (1) relationships, (2) the overlooked and (3) the hints of God’s grace in our lives.

The first thing Fr. Bausch says we would want to see differently is what our heart has always told us is true: that relationships are the most important part of life.  This would lead us to ask ourselves why we allowed the madness of individualism and consumerism to get ahead of our relationships?  Why did we allow our careers and our schedules, our entertainment and our desire to accumulate things push the people in our lives to the side? When we look at our lives, all to often our most important relationships—the relationships between husband and wife, children and parents, and friends—are not as treasured as we know they should be.  We don’t eat together, we don’t take time for the people we love.  Yet, in our most sober moment we know that nothing is more important than our relationships.  Then why don we see it?

RELATED HOMILIES

FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

THE TERROR OF LOVE

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

I was once invited to give a series of meditations to a group of sisters who were new novices in a rather strict—some would call it conservative—community. I made an early mistake. One of the first things I proposed to the young gathering was my conviction that fear was not the best way to approach God, especially if we are followers of Christ. In fact, I said, it seems that fear has very little place in our relationship to God.

As we see in the prophecy of Jeremiah, God wants us to shout for joy. We are delivered, gently gathered from the ends of the earth, with all the others of our motley kind, neither seeing straight nor walking tall. We may have had our tears, but our God wants to console and guide us, to lead us to refreshing waters. God is a parent to us. What use is there to fear a parent unless that parent is not very good? And surely God is good. We are like God’s “firstborn.” Why would we live in fear of God?

30th Sunday of Year B

Cardinal Tagle

GOD HEALS OUR BLINDNESS

SOURCE: THE WORD EXPOSED (2018)
The Pittsburgh Oratory

WHAT DO YOU WANT ME TO DO FOR YOU?

SOURCE: Homily Archive

Homily for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time preached by Father Joshua Kibler, C.O. at The Pittsburgh Oratory.

Washington Archdiocese

OFFER UP SACRIFICES FOR THE HOLY SOULS OF PURGATORY

Fr. Larry Swink, Pastor of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in La Plata, MD talks about what he’s planning for this weekend’s homily.

SOURCE: SUNDAY GAME PLAN (2018)
FR. JUDE LANGEH, CMF

“MASTER, LET ME SEE AGAIN”

READ TRANSCRIPT

This phrase, ‘Master, let me see again’ in our Gospel today shows that Bartimaeus was not BORN BLIND. He always had the opportunity of seeing and he lost his sight. We can therefore appreciate the enormity of what Jesus did for him. It was like giving him back his life. He wants to SEE AGAIN. He knows and understands that if he lets this opportunity go by, there will not be another chance. He heard that Jesus of Nazareth was passing by, so he called out to him louder and did not heed to the rest trying to silence him.  The first reading from the Prophet Jeremiah tells us that a day will come when the lame will walk and the blind will see.  And certainly, that day began with Jesus Christ.  Certainly, this is one of the teaching in today’s Gospel.  Bartimaeus sees.  The great days that Jeremiah had prophesied had begun. But, perhaps this Gospel reading is deeper than a demonstration of the powers of the Messiah to give sight to the blind.  Perhaps, it is speaking about seeing with the eyes of faith.

Those whose souls are blind to the Presence of God cannot follow him.  Only those who are willing to take a step of faith, a leap of faith, and seek out the Lord can follow Him. Spiritual blindness is lack of faith, unbelief. Someone who says that there is no God, for instance, is definitely spiritually blind. Psalm 14:1 says, “The fool has said in his heart, ‘There is not God’”. At the conclusion of the long reflection on the healing of the Man Born Blind in the ninth chapter of John, Jesus says, “I came so that those who are blind may see.”

Jesus is concerned to heal us not only of our physical blindness but also he is concerned about healing us of our intellectual and spiritual blindness. Over the centuries, therefore, the Church, the exact n Body of Christ has been in the forefront to battle to eliminate all three forms of blindness: physical blindness through health care services, intellectual blindness through education, and spiritual blindness through evangelisation and catechesis.

Let us avail ourselves of this opportunity to come to Christ. The Good News is that Jesus is always passing by. He can heal and take away whatever ailment or handicap weighing us down. Bartimaeus did not heed those who tried to dissuade him. May we never allow societal influences debar us from coming to Christ.

SOURCE:Homily Archive
John Michael Talbot

THE OLDER I GET, THE MORE I REALIZE HOW LITTLE I SEE

SOURCE: Year Cycle B – Sunday Gospel Reflections (2018)

30th Sunday of Year B

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Sunday Homilies

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30th Sunday of Year B

Friends, in today’s Gospel, we hear the marvelous story of the healing of blind Bartimaeus—an icon of tremendous power and a sacred picture of the spiritual life and the process of salvation. We all find ourselves, in our need of Christ, in this image, as our own blindness distorts our vision of spiritual reality and the meaning of life.
Sunday Podcast Archive

COMING HOME FROM EXILE

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 28, 2018

Our first reading from the prophet Jeremiah treats of a theme that is basic throughout the Bible: the motif of the return from exile. Like two great hinges on which the Old Testament turns are the stories of Exodus and Exile. Israel finds itself enslaved in Egypt, but God liberates the people; later, the northern tribes are carried off by the Assyrians; and later still, the southern tribes are carried off by the Babylonians. But exile was also a kind of spiritual metaphor, a trope for having wandered far from the Lord.


MASTER, I WANT TO SEE

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 25, 2015

The story of the healing of blind Bartimaeus is a spiritual icon of enormous power. Bartimaeus is evocative of anyone who, aware of his sin, blindness, and incapacity, hears the summons of Jesus to come into the Church, the place where vision will be restored.


SEEING THE WORLD ANEW

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 28, 2012

This Sunday’s Gospel presents the extraordinary story of Christ’s healing Bartimaeus. Bartimaeus is blind. Christ gives him not only the ability to see the world, but to see the world anew through the revelation of his Grace. The Christian way of life is best described as a new way of seeing and it is through this vision, illuminated by the light of Christ, that we are invited to know and see the world as God in Christ intends.


CALLED FROM DARKNESS INTO HIS LIGHT

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 25, 2009

The story of Bartimeaus is a model of the spiritual journey. The desire for Christ engenders in us spiritual healing, which is delivered in a profound illumination of Christ’s identity, the acceptance of which leads us into the Church.


Recent Podcasts

30th Sunday of Year B

Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the 30th Sunday of Year B.
Father Frank Pavone

THE PREFERENTIAL OPTION FOR THE POOR

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Watch a video with homily hints

The Gospel passage today about Jesus’ response to Bartimaeus epitomizes a key aspect of the Church’s teachings on social justice, namely, our preferential option for the poor. A “sizable crowd” was passing by, and the center of attention was Jesus. Not only were people not paying attention to the man by the side of the road, but his cries proved to be a nuisance, and people tried to silence him. Bartimaeus symbolizes the marginalized of our society, the inconvenient and burdensome – in short, the unwanted. Crowds pass them by every day and don’t even want to think about them.

Jesus, however, pays attention neither to the crowd nor to those who tried to eliminate the nuisance. He paid attention to the man at the margins. And he called him and healed him.

As we promote a Culture of Life, there are some who want to silence even further the already silent screams of the unborn, who constitute the most marginalized and oppressed segment of humanity today. Yet as a Church we are called to give “urgent attention and priority” to these children (see the Pastoral Plan for Pro-life Activities of the US Bishops, 2001). We are called to embody the response of Christ, ignoring the rebukes of the “politically correct” segments of our society, and identifying ourselves with the “man at the margins.” Not only is this an imitation of Christ, but it is a fulfillment in our day of the prophecy of Jeremiah that we hear in the first reading. God’s promise regarding his scattered and oppressed people is, “I will gather them.” That’s what the pro-life effort of the Church does – it gathers back together those who are scattered by the legal fiction that their lives are not equal to the rest of people; it restores protection to those who would otherwise be scattered by the physical violence of abortion.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: We trust and hope in the goodness of the Lord, and we bring to Him our needs, the needs of the Church, and those of the whole world.

Deacon/Lector: 

That the Church may faithfully carry out its mission to gather people to God by proclaiming and living the Gospel of Jesus Christ, we pray to the Lord.

That all priests may be strengthened in their vocations, and that all the faithful may support their priests with prayer, gratitude, and active collaboration, we pray to the Lord.

That the youth of our society and of the Church may hear the voice of the Lord and fully utilize all the gifts he gives them for the service of others, we pray to the Lord.

That our eyes may be opened to see more clearly the dignity of every human life, whether healthy or sick, convenient or inconvenient, born or unborn, we pray to the Lord.

That those who are sick or homebound may be comforted and assured of our ongoing prayer for them, we pray to the Lord.

That those who have died may know the peace of the heavenly kingdom in the company of the angels and saints, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant: Almighty God, you are the source of every blessing and we give you praise and thanks.  Accept our humble prayers and grant what we need according to your holy will, through Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Bulletin Insert

Where we begin…

“In protecting human life, we must begin with a commitment never to intentionally kill, or collude in the killing, of any innocent human life, no matter how broken, unformed, disabled or desperate that life may seem. We urge Catholics and others to promote laws and social policies that protect human life and promote human dignity to the maximum degree possible. Laws that legitimize abortion, assisted suicide, and euthanasia are profoundly unjust and immoral. We support constitutional protection for unborn human life, as well as legislative efforts to end abortion and euthanasia” (Faithful Citizenship, US Bishops, 2003).

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

From darkness to light

Al Carino

To follow Jesus means to reflect in our own lives His passion and death. Since the roots of our blindness are found in our pride and egoism or selfishness, the only adequate way to expose these roots to the light of the truth is through the suffering and humiliation we go through.


Jumping at the Opportunity

Antonio P. Pueyo

Bartimaeus was telling his grandchildren about that miracle by the road and how he became a disciple. It made such a joyful difference in his life. On the other hand, the rich young man who was a good man has become a respected elder in his community, with loving children and grandchildren. But every time he tells the story about meeting Jesus on the road, he shakes his head and says, ” I could have joined the band of disciples.”


That I May See

Frank Enderle

If we want to be true followers of Jesus, our faith must be like Bartimaeus’. When we ask the Lord for guidance and help, we must be prepared to accept whatever the answer will be even if it is not the answer we expected,


What Really Matters

Antonio P. Pueyo

We do not need calamities and catastrophes to motivate us to put our sense of values in order. We can ask ourselves now about what really matters in our life. Like Bartimaeus, we can pray for that which we really need and is really important.


Proclaiming the Good News

Douglas P. McManaman

Every one of us lives in circumstances that give us the opportunity to love others with supernatural charity, to smile at others and rejoice in them for God’s sake, and in doing so channel that divine love to them. That’s what it means to proclaim the good news.


Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing

Tom Bartolomeo

The outcome of our national elections does not decide our salvation. Our opposition to intrinsic evil does, particularly upholding traditional marriage, the dignity of human conception and the protection of the life of the unborn child. Evil of such magnitude trumps and far outweighs any and all other considerations. We can not be so blind to the truth and not “cry out and say . . . with courage” as did Bartimaeus: Jesus, Son of David, have pity on me . . . I want to see.


Sightings

Proclaim Sermons

In this exchange with an earnest and well-meaning scribe, Jesus teaches the scribe, and us, not only what is the greatest commandment, but what is the one overarching purpose of every commandment.

<href=”http://www.lifeissues.net/”>Lifeissues.net WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

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