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29th Sunday of Year B

No one can escape suffering, writes Father Hawkswell, “but Christians believe that God works within it.” (JumpStory)
FATHER VICENT HAWKSWELL

‘WE MUST THINK OF LOVE AS SUFFERING’

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

This Sunday’s Readings speak of suffering, especially the suffering that is the consequence of sin and, paradoxically, is the remedy for sin.

As C.S. Lewis shows, suffering “is inherent in the very existence of a world where souls can meet” (The Problem of Pain). We can expect, then, to find it built into the world God gives us to enter into love with him.

“We must think of love as suffering,” says Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. To say yes to love is to risk suffering, for “love means being dependent on something that perhaps can be taken away from me.” To say no to love is to decide that rather than “bear this risk,” see “my self-determination limited,” or “depend on something I cannot control,” I would “rather not have love.”

Fr. Michael Chua

CAN YOU DRINK THE CUP THAT I MUST DRINK?

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

“Can you drink the cup that I must drink?” If we are being asked that same question today, I believe that our first and primary concern would be about hygiene. “Can I actually catch a disease from someone who shares my cup?” Picture that anxiety that is running through your mind as you see a friend request to share a bottle of water with you or wants to taste your drink.

If you are worried about sharing a cup because it can make you sick, the context of our Lord’s request is far more insidious. Sharing a cup with the Lord can get you killed! When the Lord asked His disciples if they were willing to drink from the same cup that He would be drinking, He was making an allusion to an important position in the king’s court – the Royal Cupbearer. The Royal Cupbearer was an official of high ranking who enjoyed the King’s trust.

FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

SERVING ONE ANOTHER AS JESUS SERVED US

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

The point of these scriptures, as the church has assembled them here, is that we are called to serve one another as Jesus served us. That’s a tall order, especially when phrased in terms of being  “crushed in infirmity and affliction” and being a “servant to others, a slave to all.” Sometimes it’s helpful to work with the language scripture uses – not to water it down, not to dilute it – but to make it more accessible in the hope that we might be able to see a way to  live what the Word asks of us. So, let’s look at what it might mean to be a servant of others, even a slave of all – in terms we can grasp and live up to.

The quick answer here is that we look for ways to serve others with our time, our talents and our treasure. You’ve heard this trio of T words before. It’s used a lot because it’s true. One of our most precious commodities is our time. Sharing and giving our time away for others is an important way to serve our neighbor. Time, and talent. .. We all have gifts and talents to help us serve one another. Some of these are more obvious, more attention-getting than others – but all our gifts and talents are meant to be shared for the sake of the common good. And treasure.Some of us have more treasure than others but treasure is a relative category. A $5 offering from one person might actually be more and more generous than a $100 offering from someone else, depending on our individual, personal resources. Our treasure is given us by God to be shared, especially with those in need.

MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

HOW TO BE A GOAT

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

There is an expression in the world of sports that a particular player deserves to be called the GOAT. Now years ago, if an athlete was called a goat, it meant that his performance at a game was so poor that he bore much of the responsibility for the team losing.  But that is not how the term goat is used now.  To be a goat is to be the Greatest of All Time.  Here in Tampa Bay, our football team has Tom Brady,  a player who is commonly referred to as the GOAT.  People may claim that  Michael Jordan is the GOAT in professional basketball.  Others might say that the title GOAT belongs to  LeBron James.

Some athletes are far from being GOATS, but act as though they were.  They have an entourage of people who are continually telling them how wonderful they are.  They lord it over their teammates as though the others were second rate citizens in their world of wonderfulness.

But you don’t have to go to sports to witness those who are so full of themselves that they act as though they are goats.  James and John in today’s gospel acted that way.  They felt that they should sit at the right hand and left hand of the Lord when Jesus came into His Glory.  They wanted to lord it over the other disciples.  Or, at least they wanted it to be clear that they were much better than the others.  Jesus told them that they were clueless.  They didn’t understand where greatness came from.

RELATED HOMILIES

FR. GEORGE SMIGA

THE FIRST GIFT FROM THE LORD

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2003

What was the first gift that Jesus gave us?  When he began his earthly ministry, what was the first step that Jesus took?  What was the foundation that he laid upon which he intended to build everything else? Jesus’ first step was not to erect a building.  The first Christian church was not built until centuries after his death.  Nor was his first step to write the scriptures.  The first writings of the Christian scriptures were not composed until decades after Jesus’ ministry ended. Nor was his first gift, to give the Spirit.  The Spirit did not descend until after the resurrection.  Nor did Jesus begin by instituting the Eucharist.  That sacred meal which we share was established on the night before he died.

No, Jesus’ first step was to establish a community.  Immediately after his baptism, he went out and called disciples who could share life with one another.  Therefore, the first gift that Jesus gave to us, is the gift of one another.  He did this because he knew that if his teaching was to be understood, if his miracles were to have an effect, if his mission was to impact the world, he would need a band of men and women who shared a common identity.  He would need disciples who would discover in their relationships with each other his very presence in their midst.

RELATED HOMILIES

FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

LORDING IT OVER THE REST

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

Most of us have heard of the contrast between “Christology from below” and “Christology from above.” This opposition sneaks into most theological discussions, whether they are about dogma, scripture, morality, mission, or salvation.

Most of us are not theologians, but we can still sense what it is all about. The “above” emphasizes the divinity of Christ, the transcendent; the “below” emphasizes the full humanity of the Jesus of history.

Christology from above is the “old” way of thinking. It presumes that God, from above, enters history in Jesus, the eternal Word made flesh. Its strongest insights support our intuitive recognition of human inadequacy. It demands an admission that we are not enough. It calls for intervention and assistance from a reality beyond our own.

29th Sunday of Year B

Cardinal Tagle

THE PATHS OF GOD’S SAVING ACTION

SOURCE: THE WORD EXPOSED (2018)
The Pittsburgh Oratory

JESUS GAVE HIS LIFE AS A RANSOM FOR MANY

SOURCE: Homily Archive

Homily for the Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time preached by Father Peter Gruber, C.O. at The Pittsburgh Oratory.

Washington Archdiocese

INCREDIBLE INSPIRING HUMILITY OF THE LORD

Fr. Larry Young, Pastor of Ascension Catholic Church in Bowie, MD talks about what he’s planning for this weekend’s homily.

SOURCE: SUNDAY GAME PLAN (2018)
FR. JUDE LANGEH, CMF

THE SUFFERING SERANT LEADER

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In the most crucial period in Jesus’ life and ministry, Jesus revealed that suffering through the cross was the inevitable means to attain Glory. Our Gospel today reveal how James and John were tactically vying and scheming for the best seats in his kingdom. Their intention was to flank Jesus on the right and on the left hand. The other apostles who did not express this feeling were also indignant. It is not impossible that they too were eying these positions but never had the courage the other two had. It is clear that the disciples had the common misconception that leadership role over others comes with glory, power, and positions of honour.

In most cases we want to be recognized, appreciated and put on our right positions especially when we are leaders. Jesus’ reply to the sons of Zebedee epitomized the importance of servant leadership. Being leaders or ministers meant being the servants of many. True leadership is to be found in serving others. In serving others, there is no ulterior or selfish motive attached. The lesson we can learn from Jesus is that he modeled the true servant style of leadership. This is found in service. He, being the Lord incarnate, had the humility to bend down and wash the feet of the disciples thus teaching them the true measure of leading by first serving others (John 13:12-17).

Serving others entail drinking from the cup of suffering Jesus drank. Great musicians and artists will pass through long and rigorous periods of practice and deprivation of comfort to prepare a trilling public performance of 15 minutes. Leaders are great servants who have passed through moments of trials and suffering to attain their greatness.

SOURCE:Homily Archive
John Michael Talbot

WHOEVER WISHES TO BE GREAT AMONG YOU WILL BE YOUR SERVANT

SOURCE: Year Cycle B – Sunday Gospel Reflections (2018)

29th Sunday of Year B

BASILICA OF THE NATIONAL SHRINE

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Celebrant & Homilist: Msgr. Raymond East

Sunday Homilies

OCT 17, 2021 | OCT 21, 2018 | OCT 18, 2015 | OCT 20, 2012 | OCT 18, 2009

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29th Sunday of Year B

Friends, power and honor, in and of themselves, are not a bad thing, but we wreak havoc when we ask for them in the wrong spirit. When we beseech the Lord with our desires, let us ask for what God wants for us rather than what our egos have determined to be good.
Sunday Podcast Archive

SUBSTITUTIONARY SACRIFICE

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 21, 2018

Friends, all three readings for this weekend center around a theme that was very familiar to the ancient audiences who first took them in but that is rather alien to us. I’m talking about the theme of substitutionary sacrifice. A very basic problem that we have when we seek to understand this idea is that we are marked, through and through, by a strong individualism: everyone acts and speaks for himself and takes responsibility for his own actions. But ancient people lived within a far more collective or corporate consciousness.


REAL SPIRITUAL POWER

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 18, 2015 .

When the ego grabs power and honor for itself, things get dangerous and dysfunctional very quickly. The ego will want to use power, not for God’s purposes, but for its own exaltation & defense. In today’s gospel reading, Jesus confronts a misguided desire for power within both James and John so as to direct them to real spiritual power, which offers them — and us — the greatest freedom.


TRUE AMBITION

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 21, 2012

In today’s Gospel, the apostles James and John ask Jesus to be given positions of glory in Christ’s kingdom. Jesus reminds us that His moment of glory is His death on the Cross, and that if we want to partake in this glory we must commit to a self-sacrificing love, not a self aggrandizing ambition.


THE SUFFERING SERVANT

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 18, 2009

This Sunday’s readings highlight the idea of redemptive suffering. The revelation of Christ changes our disposition towards the difficulties of life, filling these experiences with the potential for goodness. In his Incarnation, Christ did not evade the often harsh realities of human experience, but he accepted them, knowing that he would be with us in all things. The challenge for us is that in the face of the inevitable challenges of life is this: will we accept hardship as an occasion to grow in holiness and deepen our relationship with the Lord.


THE VOICE OF AMBITION

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 22, 2006

James and John want to sit at Jesus’ right and left when the Lord comes into his glory. What they don’t realize is that his glory is the moment of his crucifixion. To be at his right and his left at his enthronement is, therefore, to be crucified with him, to be willing to give oneself totally away. Be careful what you ask for!


A RANSOM FOR THE MANY

by Bishop Robert Barron . October 19, 2003

What does it mean to say that Jesus died for our sins? How precisely does his cross save us? The first Christians saw sin as a sort of imprisonment, like being held for ransom, and in the dying and rising of Jesus, they experienced freedom. What freed them was God’s solidarity with them in their fear, even their fear of death. How do you experience the power of Jesus’ death on the cross? How does it set you free?


Recent Podcasts

29th Sunday of Year B

Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the 29th Sunday of Year B. He talks about how in the Kingdom of God, differences in roles never imply differences in the inherent human dignity of those who hold these roles. For more pro-life tips, resources and updates, visit http://www.ProLifePreaching.com.
Father Frank Pavone

NO DISTINCTION IN ROLE IMPLIES AN INEQUALITY IN DIGNITY

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Watch a video with homily hints

“Whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant.” In the Kingdom of God, and therefore in the Culture of Life, even those in authority recognize that their subjects are their brothers and sisters, and that no distinction in role implies an inequality in dignity. The smallest, the weakest, the most insignificant in the eyes of the world are, nonetheless, persons worthy of equal honor, respect, protection, and service. That is because in the Kingdom of God, we recognize that we have a King, and that the smallest human person still belongs to him, and may never be disposed of.

Government officials and candidates, therefore, would never imagine for a moment that they have the authority to declare some human beings to be “non-persons.” They would never support the affirmation that some people are outside the protections of the law – as Roe vs. Wade did in regard to children in the womb.

The second reading today provides a clear basis for this respect for the very least of our brothers and sisters, and that is that our human nature has been taken to the heights of heaven. Jesus, the “great high priest who has passed through the heavens,” is a priest precisely because, while remaining Divine, he also shares our human nature – the same human nature shared by every person, born and unborn. He has taken this human nature to the heights of heaven, where he continues to intercede for us. Human life was sacred at its creation, and becomes all the more sacred as Christ the High Priest takes it to the very throne of the Father. We who acknowledge that human life has been taken to the heights of heaven can never sit idly by while it is thrown in the garbage by abortion and other acts of violence.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: We are called to serve our brothers and sisters.  Let us carry out our responsibilities as disciples and call on the name of the Lord on behalf of those in need.

Deacon/Lector:

That the Church may continue to preach the Gospel with vigor and call us to turn away from sin to a new life in God’s love, we pray to the Lord.

That all missionaries may receive the strength they need from the Lord, and that all the faithful may be more aware of their own call to spread the gospel, we pray to the Lord.

That leaders of nations may seek the guidance of the Lord to enable them to better serve their people with integrity and justice, we pray to the Lord.

That Jesus, who sympathizes with our weakness, may grant forgiveness and healing to all who have committed the sin of abortion, we pray to the Lord.

That the victims of war, violence, poverty or injustice may be assisted and comforted by those who serve in the name of Jesus, we pray to the Lord.

That those who have died may experience the grace and mercy of Jesus and enter into eternal life with him, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant: Lord God, hear our prayers for all those in need.  We trust in your faithful love which is your gift to all, and ask you to hear and answer our prayers, through Christ our Lord.

Bulletin Insert

Texas Bishops Praise Heartbeat Law

“Unanimously the Texas Catholic Bishops celebrated the passage of this life beating bill and state, “we celebrate every life saved by this legislation”. Opponents of the law argue the term “heartbeat” is misleading. Strangely they call it “embryonic cardiac activity” or worse. These attempts to dehumanize the unborn are disturbing. The bishops stress that abortion is a human life issue: the most fundamental human life is the right to life. Abortion is in no way healthcare. Abortion is not freedom. Abortion is not helping women as it is always a violent taking of innocent human life.”  – Texas “Heartbeat Law” Will Keep the Hearts of Thousands of Tiny Unborn Beating with Life, Bishop Michael Pfeifer, O.M.I., Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of San Angelo

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

Formula for greatness

Al Carino

Once, a journalist saw Mother Teresa of Calcutta who was then engaged in picking up the dying from the streets and caring for them. He told her, “Not even for a million dollars would I do a job like that.” “Neither would I,” answered Mother Teresa.


On Mission to Serve

Antonio P. Pueyo

One way to arrive in a village is from the top using a helicopter. This disturbs the serenity of rural life. Everybody who is asleep is awakened. The vehicle stirs up a lot of dust and creates a lot of noise. Everyone goes running over to see the strange vehicle and whoever it is ferrying. What a triumphant arrival. On the other hand one can quietly arrive walking or on the back of water buffalo.


Can you drink the cup that I drink?

Douglas P. McManaman

If you truly love someone who you see is suffering, you will want to share their suffering in some way. You will not allow them to suffer alone. To allow someone to suffer at a distance, without entering into his/her suffering in any way, is not love at all.


Leper-Saint

Antonio P. Pueyo

“Servire, non serviri,” to serve not to be served. This theme runs through all the readings this Sunday. As we celebrate World Mission Sunday, let us be inspired by the story of that great missionary who was proclaimed a saint by Pope Benedict last Sunday, Fr. Damien the leper. His life and his work illustrate what is meant by missionary service.


Service in the Rule of Life

Tom Bartolomeo

God could give us a free pass, but why would he? No value, no glory in that. Besides, we would be ‘uneasy’ among so many who made sacrifices for others and out of place in heaven. Easy come, easy go. Whatever our relationships, fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, aunts, uncles, cousins, employers, employees, friends, neighbors and strangers – our glory is serving others, not ourselves, both as benefactors and beneficiaries, all in one, in the sacrifices we make.


A Race to the Bottom

Proclaim Sermons

James and John ask Jesus to “do whatever they ask of him.” Jesus uses their asking for places of honor in the kingdom as an opportunity to talk about true discipleship, which is seen not in positions of glory, but in places of service. Indeed, for followers of Christ, it is a “race to the bottom” – not seeking to be recognized so much as to be in service for God.

<href=”http://www.lifeissues.net/”>Lifeissues.net WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

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