1st Sunday of Advent, Year C

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COMMENTARY – NEW FORMAT!

FR. VINCENT HAWKSWELL

BEAR WITNESS ‘HEART TO HEART’

Homilies

BC CATHOLIC | 2021

Jesus calls all the baptized to evangelize and spread the Gospel. This homily is the third in a series of three following the recent Upper Room evangelization event. 

“All the baptized, whatever their position in the Church or level of instruction in the faith, are called to be agents of evangelization, directed by the Holy Spirit,” said Archbishop Michael Miller CSB at the recent “Upper Room” evangelization event in Vancouver.

“Evangelize” means “proclaim the Gospel.” As I said in my last two homilies, that entails knowing and loving Jesus Christ.

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FR. GEORGE SMIGA

ADVENT HOPE

HomiliesBUILDING ON THE WORD | 2003

After awhile, you get tired of hoping. After months and years of waiting, you begin to think, it is foolish to hold on. After trying and attempting so often to change things, you can begin to wonder whether it is time to give up. How do we continue to hope when so few things change? Does it even make sense to keep waiting when so few signs of hope can be seen?

How long have we been waiting for healing within our families? How often have we tried to bring estranged relatives together to resolve past hurts? Does it make sense to keep waiting, to keep hoping for reconciliation? How long have we been waiting for someone to love us, for someone to understand and enjoy us, for someone to build a life and a family together with us? How many times did we think, this was it, only to be disappointed? Does it make sense to keep hoping that the right person will come into our life? How long have we been waiting for our problems to be solved, for our sickness to be healed, for our grief to end? Does it make sense to keep hoping even when our hopes are so often frustrated?

The Gospel today, says that it does. The Gospel makes clear that the foundation of our hope is not what has happened to us in the past, but what God intends to do for us in the future. Today’s gospel shows great turmoil on the earth and distress among the nations, but its message is that underneath that turmoil, God is working to change things. God is working to establish the Kingdom. It is God’s action which is the foundation of our hope. That is why Jesus says that we should stand up and raise our heads because our redemption is at hand. We can always stand in hope because we believe that God is always working to change things and to bring about salvation.

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More Homilies by Fr. Smiga

  • Remembering and Rehearsing Advent (2006)
  • The Christmas Blues (2012)
  • The Lord, Our Justice (2015)
  • Turmoil, Fear, and Dismay (2018)
FR. AUSTIN FLEMING

CHRISTMAS WISH LIST FOR GOD

Homilies

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2018

I love the season of Advent – just beginning today!
And I try to “keep it” as a time of preparation,
doing everything I can not to celebrate Christmas
before it gets here.
But with the whole world “going Christmas” all around me
– it’s not easy –  and sometimes, I just give in!

• Haul out the holly!
Put up the tree before my – spirits fall again!
Fill up the stockings, I may be rushing things but
– deck the halls again now:
For we need a little Christmas, right this very minute,
candles in the window, carols at the spinet.
Yes, we need a little Christmas, right this very minute,
we need a little Christmas, now! 

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ABBOT PHILIP LAWRENCE, OSB

GOD IS READY TO GIVE US A FRESH VISION

Homilies

CHRIST IN THE DESERT MONASTERY | 2015

We begin the holy season of Advent this Sunday and a new Liturgical Year begins. The message we will be hearing throughout Advent is this: prepare your hearts, for our God is sending a Savior, Emmanuel, a name which means, God-with-us.

The firm conviction that God comes to us, an important Advent theme, implies on our part an active life of prayer and participation in the liturgy and sacraments of the Church and willing service of one another. Advent calls us once again to this important work, to meet the God who comes to us each day.

In this season we especially ponder birth of Christ in Bethlehem 2000 years ago to save the human race. Advent and our annual Christmas celebrations are meant to enliven our adherence to Christ our Savior as we recount our God becoming one of us in order to save us.

We also recount in Advent that God comes at the moment of our death and at the end of time.

We might ask, then: which coming of our God is the most important? In fact each and every appearance of our God, past, present and future is an important manifestation of the love God has for us and the desire to save us.

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FATHER MICHAEL CUMMINS

ADVENT: RETURN TO THE BEGINNING

DIOCESE OF KNOXVILLE | 2015

Our world is in a dark place.  There is work that needs to be done.  Before we rush to the work, we should return to the beginning and immerse ourselves in that inner source of life which is our faith in the work of God himself.  Patience is the foundation of all true progress.

I would suggest that in a particular way this Advent we stand with the saints of this season and we learn from them how to return to the beginning.  This lesson is too important; too critical to the times we now live in, to bypass.

When all is said and done we may very well recognize that human history was carried neither by the proud nor the arrogant nor the centers of our world’s powers but rather by the patient – the ones who learned how to continually return to the beginning in order to arise in new freedom and new awareness.

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MSGR. JOSEPH PELLEGRINO

PREPARING FOR THE LORD

Homilies

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

We begin Advent focusing on the two comings of the Lord. We are looking forward to the celebration of the first coming in Bethlehem. There were many prophesies of this coming in the Bible. Today’s first reading quotes just one of these prophecies, from the Prophet Jeremiah. The days are coming when the promise to Israel will be fulfilled and a just shoot shall rise from the line of David. He will do all that is right and just. It was in the City of David, Bethlehem, that this prophecy would be fulfilled.

The second coming of the Lord is that which takes place at the end of time. Jesus speaks about this in apocalyptical terms in today’s Gospel. His language is meant to engage us, involve us. We can’t just be passive bystanders to the words, “People will die in fright in anticipation of what is coming.” The Lord’s words cause us to react with the question: “What can we do to be ready for the end time?”

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FR. MICHAEL CHUA

ADVENT IS FOR ADULTS

Homilies

KUALA LUMPUR | 2018

Advent hardly gives cause for excitement to our otherwise mundane lives, except that it reminds us that Christmas is just around the corner.  But as the Church frequently reminds us in what often seems to be a “wet-blanket” “party-pooping” sort-of-a-way: ‘not yet!’ No, all our excitement is geared towards Christmas. To the secular world and to many of us Catholics too, it marks the time for holidays, family trips, exhausting our annual leave at work, family reunions, decorations and carols, and of course, all the shopping to be done for the festive season. It’s the season of the year when we get to relive our childhood. But there is something about Advent that is so essential to our Catholic faith, our adult Catholic faith. You see Christmas may be (ideal) for children, but Advent is for adults. It is a realistic time when we adult Christians have to take stock of our lives, and admit and confess the shoddiness and second rated nature of much of our living as Christians. In our on-going pilgrimage of faith and hope and love, all three have flickered and faltered. Yes, Advent is for adults.

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FR. JOHN KAVANAUGH, SJ

A TIME OF CHILDHOOD

HomiliesSUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

It used to be that, once the celebration of Thanksgiving was over, I would go to the windows almost every morning, looking for snow. It is one of my earliest memories, a tissue of images held together by feelings that always had something to do with expectancy.

For children of other countries or climates, the prod might not have been Thanksgiving or the thought of snow, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the early days of Advent were, for Christian boys and girls, eager ones.

Some children had Advent calendars, others had wreaths decked with candles. Many observed the strangely prophetic feast of St. Nicholas, with its long stockings bulging with many small promises of greater gifts to come.

Songs changed with December. Worldly anxiety combined with hope in “You better watch out … Santa Claus is coming to town.” The “Dance of the Toy Soldiers” made the spine tingle. And church hymns deepened everything: “O come, O come. … ” “wake, awake, the night is dying.”

FR. EVANS CHAMA, M.AFR

SEE, BETTER DAYS ARE COMING

SINGLE HUMANITY | 2018

Here we are again in year C, opening with the season of Advent. It’s not a repetition but a grace period given us to renew our momentum as we actively await the coming of the Lord. It should be a time of joy, yet, the preluding events are terrifying. How do they help us to prepare ourselves?

We await a savoir who comes to rescue us from whatever destroys the beauty in which we, and the world, have been created. It’s the events happening in our lives, and in the world, that make his coming necessary. Perhaps, in that way we can understand better the extraordinarily shocking events that precede his arrival.

On one hand, the alarming events show the importance of the Lord’s Day that leaves no one indifferent; hence, an invitation to remain vigilant. On the other hand, they may point also to the extent of evil and destruction that we see going on in our world, that is, the damage caused to ourselves and to the environment.  Examples are not rare.

Fr. Chama’s homily is divided into the following sections:

  • Events that shock us
  • Advent, season of revival
  • Advent, time of legitimate pride
  • Not like Thessalonians
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Celebrant & Homilist: Msgr. Raymond East Guest Choir: Religious Family of the Incarnate Word, Saint Cecilia Choir

Sunday Homilies

NOV 28, 2021 | DEC 2, 2018 | NOV 29, 2015 | DEC 2, 2012 | NOV 29, 2009

COMMENTARY – NEW FORMAT!

HOMILY TRANSCRIPTS

Sunday Sermon

Look Back, Look Around, Look Forward

Friends, many years ago, in the context of a high school religion class, a very wise Benedictine nun gave me a template for understanding Advent that I’ve never forgotten. It is simply that Advent calls to mind three “comings” of Christ: the first in history, the second now, and the third at the end of time. Meditating upon each of these is a helpful preparation for the holy season upon which we are embarking.


Sunday Podcast Archive

A NEW FIXED STAR

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 2, 2018

This Sunday is New Year’s Day, in the liturgical sense of the term. With the first Sunday of Advent, we commence the liturgical year of 2019. And New Year’s day is always a good time for resolutions, taking stock, starting over again. I want to interpret our Gospel for this Sunday, which portrays Jesus is full apocalyptic mode, in that spirit.


ADVENT AND THE SHAKING OF THE KINGDOMS

by Bishop Robert Barron

Our Gospel for this first Sunday of Advent begins where the readings for the end of last liturgical year left off, namely, with apocalyptic musings. We’re encouraged to look for the Son of Man, coming on the clouds of heaven, which signals the end of the world as we know it. But the Son of man is coming on the clouds of heaven even now in the life of the Church. Even now the true king, the successor of David, is in our midst. But we need eyes trained by the liturgy to see him.


LOOK TO THE SON OF MAN

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 2, 2012

At the start of this new liturgical year, we hear Luke’s account of Jesus speaking about the end to all we believe to be permanent – the earth, the sky and order will all be disrupted. This isn’t meant to scare us, but to remind us of what is permanent, on what we can depend. Jesus is the link to this stability and truth, and in this realization we may find unending peace.


THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT

by Bishop Robert Barron . November 29, 2009

The apocalyptic imagery of this Sunday’s scriptures directs us to appreciate the finite nature of all worldly things and the truth that the only reality that endures in this world of inevitable change and loss is the Lordship of God in Christ.


THE SECOND COMING

by Bishop Robert Barron . December 3, 2006

The readings for this first Sunday of Advent focus, not on the historical coming of Jesus at Bethlehem, but rather at his eschatological coming at the end of time. Knowing that all of history tends toward and culminates in Jesus changes radically the way we live now.

Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, shares thoughts on preaching pro-life on the First Sunday of Advent in Year C. We hear the theme of repentance in the scriptures, especially at the beginning of the season. As Advent develops the theme focuses in on the birth of Christ.
Father Frank Pavone

CHRIST’S DOMINION OVER HUMAN LIFE

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Dn 7:13-14
Rv 1:5-8
Jn 18:33b-37

Watch a Video with Homily Hints

The beginning of the Season of Advent provides a powerful opportunity to touch upon pro-life themes in the Liturgy.

First of all, the theme of the Second Coming of the Lord – a theme particularly strong in the first part of Advent – calls us as individuals and as a society to repentance in preparation for the Lord’s coming. This repentance includes living with active respect for every human life, and building a society of justice and welcome for the most vulnerable.

Secondly, Advent is about preparation for the birth of the Lord. The joy of his birth, as John Paul II wrote in Evangelium Vitae, is reflected in the joy at the birth of every child. Advent is a perfect time to commend to the prayers of our people all who are carrying a child, and may be tempted by fear or a lack of trust in God’s Providence.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: As we begin this Advent season of prayer and expectation, let us present our needs before God with confidence.

Deacon/Lector:

That the Church, with eager longing for the return of Christ, may prepare for Him by building a world of justice, we pray to the Lord.

That leaders of nations may seek that justice and peace which come from the Word of God, we pray to the Lord.

That all who have not yet heard of the coming of Christ may hear and believe the Good News, we pray to the Lord.

That the gift of justice may transform our land, making secure the lives of the poor, the vulnerable, and the unborn, we pray to the Lord.

That the sick and the lonely may find comfort in Christ and the Church, we pray to the Lord.

That all who have died may be freed from sin and stand securely before the Son of Man, we pray to the Lord.

Celebrant:

Father, we wait in joyful hope for the coming of Christ our Savior.  As you answer our prayers, make us holy, that we may greet him with eager hearts, who lives and reigns forever and ever. Amen.

Bulletin Insert

From someone who had an abortion…

“[The abortion] gave me grief and sorrow beyond expression. I was petrified to tell anyone. I have committed the most heinous of all crimes.  Yet, the Lord forgave me, just as he forgave Paul. Yet I will always regret what I did and will probably always feel grief. But I pray that my experience can somehow prevent other women from making the same fatal mistake. I’m a nurse now, so I wear my uniform to all the pro-life things I do! It helps.” Forgiveness and healing are available. Visit www.RachelsVineyard.org.

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

Advent: Expecting … Preparing

Al Carino

How are we to prepare for the coming of the Lord? Though the external trimmings add color to the occasion, what really counts is the preparation that takes place in our hearts.


Be Vigilant

Antonio P. Pueyo

If we do not want to meet anybody, it is because we are unprepared, ashamed, afraid, or feel unworthy. The Good News is that the Lord is eager to meet us and wants to come among us, even the way we are now. If the Lord is eager to meet us, even as we are, we naturally would like to make ourselves and our homes more presentable to Him.


The Dawn of Salvation

Antonio P. Pueyo

The Prophet Isaiah had a vision of a future time of peace when swords will be turned into plowshares and spears into pruning hooks (Isaiah 2:1-5). I read a modern version of this in the newspapers. In one country, an award for community development in the form of a plaque was made from melted AK-47 gun barrels.


Do not worry

Douglas P. McManaman

This Advent Season let us commit ourselves to works of mercy. If we do, we will find life, because we will find Christ, who chooses for his dwelling the weakest, poorest, lowliest of human beings, those to whom the world does not care to pay any attention. If we begin to pay attention to them, we will find Christ, we will find life, and our lives will be lit up by a light that shines in the darkness.


The bet you don’t want to make

Tom Bartolomeo

As we begin Advent I would suggest a new frame of mind for this season of promise, a simplified sense of time in the manner of Jesus Christ. As many of us Jesus also had much on his mind, the imminent tribulation he endured before his final entry into Jerusalem and his crucifixion, but still managed to instruct his disciples that “the Light is with you” [referring to himself] “for a little while longer. Walk while you have the light, lest the darkness overtake you … while you have the light, believe in the light”, John 12, 35-36. Peter, his Apostle, described the Light like a “lamp shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rise in your hearts”, 1 Peter 1, 35. Compared to eternity our lives can truly be understood as one day, “a little while”, waiting for the night to pass and the rising of “the morning star” before dawn and the final Advent of Jesus Christ.


Who Shall Climb the Mountain of the Lord?

Douglas P. McManaman

For us who are up there in age, it’s really about climbing that mountain of the Lord and strengthening our brothers and sisters who are climbing with us. While we grab on to the arm of another who is ahead of us, we have to reach down and pull up those who are a few steps behind us who are having a difficult time in a difficult spot where we were just a moment ago or a few years ago.


You Are What You Will

Douglas P. McManaman

Our choices determine our moral identity, and in heaven, we will wear our identity like clothing. In this world, our clothing conceals us, in heaven, our clothing reveals our deepest moral identity, who we are. It will be either beautiful clothing that reveals a beautiful moral identity, or it will be not so beautiful clothing, in which case we will flee from the gaze of God and the communion of saints in shame.

<href=”http://www.lifeissues.net/”>Lifeissues.net WEBSITE PUBLISHES ARTICLES DIRECTLY RELATED TO ISSUES RAISED IN EVANGELIUM VITAE, AND RELATED HOMILIES BY FR. AL CARIÑO, O.M.I., FR. TONY PUEYO, AND OTHERS.

EWTN Pro-Life Weekly

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