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11th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

NATIONAL SHRINE

Msgr. Raymond G. East (Pastor, St. Teresa of Avila Parish) preaching homily for 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time in the Crypt Church at the National Shrine (Washington D.C.) on June 17, 2018.


Sunday Homilies

June 13, 2021 | June 17, 2018 | June 14, 2015 | June 17, 2012

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

Fr. Jude Thaddeus Langeh, cmf

Being the soil ready to receive the seed

SHOW/HIDE HOMILY TRANSCRIPT

A seed in biological term is a plant’s or animal’s unit of reproduction, capable of developing into another such plant or animal. It biblical parlance, it applies to a person’s offspring or descendants. We understand why the prophecy goes that a seed shall shoot from the stock of Jesse……Jesus Christ is interpreted as the seed of David. In another understanding a seed is the cause or latent beginning of a feeling, process, or condition. There are many other definitions of a seed. Jesus hinges today on the biological understanding to talk about the kingdom of God. In most cases we know that the seen is often smaller than the resultant plant or tree. One wonders if such small seed could give rise to such a large plant.

Scientists today have sought to produce improved seeds that could also improve production. They have developed many strategies too of improving not only the seed but also the soil that receives the seed. The gardener or the farmer caters for the seed so that it produces good results.

The main question in today’s Gospel is this: What can we say the kingdom of God is like? We may be tempted to see and compare this kingdom to one of the most successful and affluent “world powers”. Jesus however takes us back to something very small which has the capacity of growing into bigger things. He compares the kingdom to a see. He even goes far as to compare it with the smallest of the seed, the mustard seed.

The seed of the kingdom has already been prepared by God. It is good seed. It is the best seed. It only needs the soil that is ready to receive the seed. If the kingdom of God is to be planted, then it is planted in us. How do we improve and cater for this soil so that it can receive the best of the seed that can ever exist. The fruits we bear will be tantamount to how we, as the soils have made ourselves ready to receive the seed.

God has wants his kingdom in us to grow into the biggest shrub and biggest branches so that birds of the air can find shelter in its shade. The poor, homeless, sick, marginalized, etc around us are in need of our shelter. We must not think we are too small to do this task. Who will do it if you don’t? At our baptism God sowed this seed of the kingdom into us. We must be the good soil in which the seed of the kingdom will grow.

Fr. Jude Thaddeus Langeh, cmf
Please pray for me

Cardinal Tagle

THE GRANDEUR OF GOD’S KINGDOM

THE WORD EXPOSED (2018)

Give witness through your word and teaching that your God is the God of love, the triune God.

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THE SMALLEST OF ALL SEEDS BECOMES THE LARGEST OF PLANTS

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11th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

Think of the world as God’s card table, writes Father Hawkswell. “We can see the cards, but not the player,” who ensures not one card falls to the table without his knowledge. (PeakPX)
Fr. Vincent Hawkswell

GOD’S PATTERNS, AND HIS MIRACLES, SHOW HE’S IN CHARGE OF ALL

B.C. CATHOLIC | 2021

Biologists describe the growth of trees in terms of seeds, sunlight, water, temperature, and cell division. Historians describe Israel’s history in terms of food, land, power struggles, war, and peace.

However, the First Reading says that it is God who does all this. Does that mean biologists and historians are wrong?

No. What biologists and historians do is describe the patterns according to which God works in the world.

We do not have to understand biology or history. However, we must understand the relation of God to the world.

As an analogy, think of the world as God’s card table. We can see the cards, but not the player. What scientists do is observe the cards and describe the patterns according to which the player plays them. The cards do not “play themselves.” No card can, of itself, cause the play of any other card. It is the player who determines everything, not one card falling to the table without his knowledge.

Click on title to read entire homily.
Fr. Austin Fleming

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT 

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2009

In St. Augustine’s effort to help us understand the comfort that is ours in believing that Christ is truly present in the Eucharist, there comes also a challenge, to believe not only that the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ, but to believe also that, indeed, we are to become what we eat and drink: we are to become the true presence of Christ breaking ourselves like bread to nourish our neighbor; pouring ourselves out like wine in outreach to those in need. Like a coin, a host as two sides: we receive a mystery that we already are and are challenged to become. We receive our own mystery which is the mystery of Christ.

And like a glass, a chalice may be half empty or half full: and we are called to empty ourselves out for one another so that we might know the fullness of God’s grace within us.

We are what we eat and drink……

Click on title to read entire homily.

Related Homilies by Fr. Fleming

The Gift of the Lord’s Broken Body (2012)
Homily for Corpus Christi Sunday (2015)

Fr. Michael CHUA

GOD IS STILL IN CHARGE

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA | 2021

This entire year has plunged many into an existential crisis. Plans have been disrupted, some even cancelled, anxiety levels have escalated as we struggle to comprehend and navigate a future that remains uncertain. One thing that many have learnt during this year is that, we are not in charge. Before this, we had bought into the myth that through hard work and a can-do (Malaysia Boleh) attitude, we can control our own lives. We can master our own destiny, captain our own ship, and set a course for the future. But we’ve realised that control is an illusion. The good news is that God is still in charge. You just need to get out of the way.

Today’s gospel treats us to two parables instead of one: the parable of the growing seed and the parable of the mustard seed. You may have heard it explained to you that parables are short stories which our Lord likes to tell His audience and how we wished that all our priests would confine their homiletic material to similar anecdotal wonders, instead of meandering off into some inexplicable theological maze where everyone gets lost. This is the popularly held view. But though their content seems simple and the message simpler still, they actually do contain something far more profound. That is why the learned of Jesus’ time often found difficulty in comprehending His message and why our Lord had to explain the meaning of these stories to His own disciples, who should have known better.

Click on title to read entire homily.

Related Homilies by Fr. Michael Chua

Humble Beginnings, Surprise Endings (2018)
In Him, We Can (2015)
‘Bing Bang’ and Mustard Seeds (2012)

Fr. Austin Fleming

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT 

A CONCORD PASTOR COMMENTS | 2009

In St. Augustine’s effort to help us understand the comfort that is ours in believing that Christ is truly present in the Eucharist, there comes also a challenge, to believe not only that the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ, but to believe also that, indeed, we are to become what we eat and drink: we are to become the true presence of Christ breaking ourselves like bread to nourish our neighbor; pouring ourselves out like wine in outreach to those in need. Like a coin, a host as two sides: we receive a mystery that we already are and are challenged to become. We receive our own mystery which is the mystery of Christ.

And like a glass, a chalice may be half empty or half full: and we are called to empty ourselves out for one another so that we might know the fullness of God’s grace within us.

We are what we eat and drink……

Click on title to read entire homily.

Related Homilies by Fr. Fleming

The Gift of the Lord’s Broken Body (2012)
Homily for Corpus Christi Sunday (2015)

Fr. Evans K Chama, M.Afr

PATIENCE OF ORGANIC FARMING

SINGLE HUMANITY | 2018

There are times and situations where we are in a hurry to see the fruits of our labour. Other times too, we wonder: when will this person change? When don’t see the fruit or when the person doesn’t change as soon as we expect, we are frustrated. How do this Sunday’s readings assure us? What can we learn from the patience of organic farming?.

It’s common to find in some farm shops foodstuffs labelled “organic”. What they want to show is that those products have been produced in the manner that respects the environment: no chemicals and no manipulations. Often, such organic products take relatively long time to grow, involving a prolonged period of work. Then you understand why they are likely to be a bit expensive. Behind the label “organic” isn’t there something godly and evangelic?

Looking at myself, others and the world we live in I can imagine the mark that God has stamped on us: “It’s organic”. His patience for Adam and Eve who distanced themselves from his love, and for Israel who broke the covenant many times just show that those practising organic farming, probably, they copied it from God.

Fr. Chama’s homily is divided into the following sections:

  • It’s Organic
  • Organic farming, the practice of his son too!
  • But not everyone acted like him!
  • Gospel of love and patience
Click on title to read entire homily.
Msgr. Joseph A. Pellegrino

TRUSTING IN GOD’S TIME

DIOCESE OF ST. PETERSBURG | 2021

There are many times that we expect too much of ourselves and others.  To make matters worse, we expect too much to happen too soon.  Sometimes parents expect their 15 year olds to act like 21 year olds.  Sometimes we get thoroughly disappointed in ourselves because we are not the perfect people we like to imagine ourselves being.  Sometimes we are impatient with how we or others are progressing in life.  We may be upset with our home situations, our marriages, our families, our jobs, or what have you.  What we have to understand is that none of us are self-made men and women.  If we trust in God, He will give growth.  This growth might be very subtle, nothing we can put our fingers on.  But after a while it suddenly occurs to us: God has brought us a long way.  If we trust in God the growth that He gives us will be more than we could imagine.  We are all small seeds, but God can make of us great trees.  However, if we think that we can do everything ourselves, and if we don’t trust in God, we won’t get anywhere.  None of us can make ourselves or others grow.

Click on title to read entire homily.

Related Homilies by Msgr. Pellegrino

God Gives the Growth (2018)

Fr. George Smiga

SMALL THINGS MATTER

BUILDING ON THE WORD | 2003

As we live any day or our life, we should never discount the small things we can do: a word of love or support to our spouse, a few moments to affirm a son or daughter about something they are good at or something that they have achieved, a phone call to a friend who is grieving the death of a loved one, or even a thankful smile instead of a vacant stare as we approach the cashier in the supermarket. These are all small things, tiny things, things that could seem to have no significance. Yet they can be important because God can choose to use them to build up some person in our lives and to increase the goodness around us. We should never discount doing small things in the course of every day.

But neither should we overlook the importance of receiving small things each day. For each day there are people in our lives who give us signs of love and support. How much richer our lives would be if we were open to accept those signs and take them in: the smile of our 3-year-old as we come home from work, the person who breaks to let us into traffic, a friend who says to us, “How are you? How are you really?” All of these are signs that God is using to show us that we are loved and that there are reasons for hope.

Click on title to read entire homily.

Related Homilies by Fr. Smiga

God is Still Working (2015)

Fr. LARRY RICHARDS

WHAT IS MY CORE INTENTION — IS IT FEAR OR LOVE?

THE REASON FOR OUR HOPE | 2015

Today we want to focus on the Second Reading and the Second Reading is where Paul talking about how he would rather die and be separated from the body so he could be with the Lord. Then he says, the one core in there that I want us to focus on that says, “Therefore, we aspire to please Him.” Everything we need to do is to please God. We need to look at our core intention, our heart and so this is what I really want us to focus on for a moment. I want you to be focusing on this week. What is your core intention when it comes to your Almighty God? Is it fear or is it love? Now, Paul sat there and said he’d rather die. Now, I’m sure if I asked how many people here by the raising of their hands would rather die this afternoon than go do something else, I’m sure there wouldn’t be many people who would raise their hands. There might be a few of you. I know, shut up. Most of you, the reality is, would go, “No, no, no. I don’t think I want that.” But, Paul says, “I desire to please Him” because one day I’m gonna stand before Him.

Click on title to read entire homily.

 

Fr. John Kavanaugh, SJ

THE IMPERCEPTIBLE LIFE

SUNDAY WEB SITE | 1997

The reign of God, this matter of faith, hope, and love, this kingdom for the ages, need not measure well in isolated moments. It is a living and growing thing.

So also our lives. Life is slow and subtle. Love takes time to show and grow. In life, little acts count. In fact, that is what a life is all about, a long parade of moments deceptively inconsequential.

Children grow before our eyes. But they age imperceptibly. We recognize growth only after it has happened. The full truth of the child is seen after the child is child no more.

We ask ourselves: have we made progress? We are almost never aware of it. Only with effort and discipline do we become fully conscious. If we keep a journal, now and then we are startled when we peruse past entries. Worries, fears, preoccupations of the previous year seem to have evanesced. The greatest terrors and strongest urgencies of five years ago now surprise, embarrass, or encourage us. Was this me? Why was it that I could not gauge it as it was lived?

Click on title to read entire homily.

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

Bishop Robert Barron

WHAT FAITH IS AND WHAT FAITH ISN’T

“We walk by faith, not by sight.”
(2 Corinthians 5:7)

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This Sunday Podcasts

THE MUSTARD SEED PRINCIPLE

by Bishop Robert Barron . June 17, 2018

Our Gospel for today features one of Jesus’ most beloved parables: that of the mustard seed. How does God tend to work? What does the building up of the Kingdom typically look like? From the very small to the very great—and usually by a slow, gradual process. God, it seems, tends to operate under the radar, on the edges of things, quietly, clandestinely.


WALKING BY FAITH AND NOT BY SIGHT

by Bishop Robert Barron . June 14, 2015

Sometimes God does things we can’t understand. This is where our need to walk by faith and not by sight comes in play. We trust in God’s purpose, and his purpose often manifests itself in the least likely of sources-the mustard seed, for example. A young man on a cross, dying alone and mocked, was the mustard seed out of which a global religion, one billion strong, grew. This is the story of so many other influential Christians, such as Francis of Assisi, Charles Lwanga and Mother Teresa. They could have been easily overlooked, forgotten, ignored, but instead they sprouted into among the most revered in our history. This is a lesson of not giving up. It’s a lesson of walking by faith, and not by sight.

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11th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

Father Frank Pavone

WE WALK BY FAITH, NOT BY SIGHT

HOMILY SUGGESTIONS

Watch a video with homily hints

Building the Culture of Life is a combination of our responsibility and God’s responsibility. In Christ, God has already conquered death and brought about the victory of life. This is the starting point both of the Church and of the pro-life movement. And the Kingdom of Life is constantly growing in the world and in the hearts of those who are open to it. The images, in the first reading and the Gospel, of constant growth under the hand of God, are meant to inspire confidence in God’s plan for the ultimate triumph of life and of all that is good.

We too share responsibility. We will be judged according to what we do (2nd reading). Either our actions will promote and defend life, or they will promote and defend death. God gives the growth, but we must constantly plant the seeds. This is the opportunity to exhort our people to practical action on behalf of the defense of life. When one life is saved, that brings into the world all the good that individual will do, and all the children that individual will have.

GENERAL INTERCESSIONS

General Intercessions

Celebrant: The Lord knows our every need and urges us to pray to him with confidence. We therefore join now with all God’s people in coming before his throne.

Deacon/Lector:

That as the Church continues to foster the growth of the Kingdom of God on earth, her members may grow in unity and holiness, we pray to the Lord…

That efforts to promote and preserve peace between the nations may be marked by perseverance and reliance on God, we pray to the Lord…

That God, who places value in the smallest of His creatures, may renew in our hearts an active love and reverence for all children, born and unborn, we pray to the Lord…

That those who travel from one nation to another seeking a home may find guidance, encouragement, and welcome, we pray to the Lord…

That those who are ill may be comforted and healed, and that those who have died may have eternal rest, we pray to the Lord…

Celebrant:

Father,
We rejoice to be your sons and daughters.
As we seek the fulfillment of our needs,
We long for the growth of your Kingdom.
Bring us safely to our eternal home.
We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

SOURCE: Priests for Life

Life Issues Homilies

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

Plant The Seed Then Be Patient

Al Carino

A big task indeed lies ahead of us. But work we must. At home, in school, at our workplace, in our community. And as we work, let us be patient. In His own time, God will bring our work, His work, to fruition.


I will lift high the lowly tree

Douglas P. McManaman

The only way to reach the lofty heights of infused mystical contemplation is to become a tender shoot. Most people aspire to be the towering cedar tree, and so they are never planted by the Lord on the high and lofty mountain of infused contemplation.

Lifeissues.net website publishes articles directly related to issues raised in Evangelium Vitae, and related homilies by Fr. Al Cariño, O.M.I., Fr. Tony Pueyo, and others.

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