Daily Homilies — December 12-17, 2022

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies
MONDAY 12TUESDAY 13WEDNESDAY 14THURSDAY 15FRIDAY 16SATURDAY 17

DECEMBER
MONDAY


12

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Feast

Morning Prayer – Feast

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer – Feast

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“The chief priests and the scribes were afraid of the people, of the truth. An indication of their flight was the fear of their hearts.” (Saint Augustine)
“Never condemn. If you want to condemn, condemn yourself. I ask the Lord for the grace that our heart may be bright with the truth, big-hearted with people, merciful.” (Francis)
“In Jesus, the same Word of God that had resounded on Mount Sinai to give the written Law to Moses, made itself heard anew on the Mount of the Beatitudes. Jesus did not abolish the Law but fulfilled it by giving its ultimate interpretation in a divine way: ‘You have heard that it was said to the men of old… But I say to you… ’ (Mt 5:33-34). With this same divine authority, he disavowed certain human traditions (Mk 7:8) of the Pharisees that were ‘making void the word of God’ (Mk 7:13)” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 581)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) The story of the apparition tells us how Jesus, as Emmanuel, and Mary his mother, want to be among us, especially among the poor, the downtrodden and the marginalized in society who have neither   voice   nor    political or social influence.  That is why Our Lady appeared to a poor Indian in a village, not as a white woman but as a brown-skinned Indian princess, speaking his native Nahuatal language, and why Mary did not appear to any of the Spanish overlords. God wanted the Basilica in honor of Jesusmother built in the village, not in the city.
2) The vision challenges us to listen to the ordinary people who do not look or act like important people and to treat them with reverence. While it is true that God loves each and every one of us, there is a special place in Gods heart for the poor and the powerless – God’s preferential option for the poor. So, the feast challenges us to see and serve Jesus in the poor and the broken-hearted in our communities.

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

USCCB VIDEO - REFLECTION
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FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Most of us know the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe. On December 9, 1531, an elderly Indian man named Juan Diego (57) had a vision of Mary, the mother of Jesus, at Tepeyac, a poor Mexican Indian village outside Mexico City. Mary directed Juan Diego to tell his Bishop to build a Church in Tepeyac.  The Spanish   Bishop, however, dismissed   the   Indians   tale   as   mere superstition. But to humor Juan Diego, the Bishop demanded that the visionary bring some sort of proof. Three days later, the Virgin Mary appeared again and told Juan Diego to pick the exquisitely beautiful roses that had miraculously bloomed amidst December snows, and take them as a sign to the Bishop. When Juan Diego opened his poncho (tilma) to present the roses to the Bishop, the flowers poured out from his poncho to reveal an image of the Virgin Mary painted on the inside of the poncho.

That image hangs today in the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico City and is venerated by thousands of pilgrims from all over the world. This apparition occasioned the conversion of nine million Indians to Christianity in twenty years. Saint John Paul II, who in 1979 became the first pope to visit the shrine in Mexico City, described the Guadalupe event as “the beginning of evangelization with a vitality that surpassed all expectations.  It is estimated that ten million pilgrims visit the Basilica every year. The original Church was built in 1533 at la Villa de Guadalupe, the second in 1556 and the third in 1709.

The 488-year-old (in 2019) Guadalupe apparition is not only one of the earliest Marian apparitions, but also the only time in history that Our Lady has shared her portrait. Our Lady not only appeared as an indigenous woman, but she also recruited an indigenous native from Cuautitlán to proclaim her message. The Virgin of Guadalupe was declared the Patroness of Latin America by Pope St. Pius X (1907). In 1945, the year that World War II ended, Pope Pius XII looked at the suffering, fragmented world and declared Our Lady of Guadalupe patroness of the Americas. Pope St. John XXXIII (1961) and Pope St. John Paul II (1979) called her Mother of America  and Star of Evangelization.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

FEATURED HOMILIES

The Silent Image
of Our Lady

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

A great sign appeared in the sky, a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.

At the heart of it all is the silent image of Our Lady. She has her head bowed in prayer, acknowledging her humble position before the Almighty God. She does not gaze on the viewer as if to demand obedience or submission. Behind her is the glory, shining in beams of light. She does not so much block the sun as shield the supplicant’s eyes from its burning rays.

The sash around her waist indicates her pregnancy; she is bringing to North America a revelation of mercy in the person of her Son. The Spanish empire was not known for clemency, but neither was the Aztec empire it supplanted. The conquistadors brought a message of peace with their Catholic missionaries, despite their hunger for gold. They brought the story of a God born in a manger and his poor peasant mother, of a homeless Messiah and a crucified redeemer, raised up not by human strength but by God’s mercy.

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The Most Amazing Woman

ONE BREAD, ONE BODY

Prayer:  Father, "I am the servant of the Lord. Let it be done to me as You say" (Lk 1:38).

Promise:  "Your deed of hope will never be forgotten by those who tell of the might of God." —Jdt 13:19

Praise:  The image of Our Lady of Guadalupe contains many symbols, colors, and meanings that showed the Mexican Indians just how sovereign God was compared to their pagan gods. Many of them converted to the Catholic Church after merely looking at the image.

TODAY'S REFLECTIONS (2022-1997)

SOURCE: Presentation Ministries

Video Homilies

Catholic TV Network

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Father Joseph Raeke preaches about the blessings we receive from the Blessed Virgin Mary and tells the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

DECEMBER
TUESDAY


13

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Memorial

Morning Prayer – Memorial

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer – Memorial

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“When there is sin in a man, such a man cannot behold God. But, if you will, you may be healed. But before all let faith and the fear of God have rule in thy heart.” (St. Theophilus of Antioch)
“‘Lord, these are my sins, they aren’t this man’s or that woman’s…. They’re mine. You take them’. When we are able to do this, then we will be that beautiful people, the humble and poor people, who trust in the name of the Lord.” (Francis)
“Jesus scandalized the Pharisees by eating with tax collectors and sinners as familiarly as with themselves. Against those among them ‘who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and despised others’ (Lk 18:9), Jesus affirmed: ‘I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance’ (Lk 5:32). He went further by proclaiming before the Pharisees that, since sin is universal, those who pretend not to need salvation are blind to themselves” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 588)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We need to lead a responsible Christian life, saying “yes” to God. We should become men and women who profess our Faith in word and deed, knowing that, “Not all those who say to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of Heaven, but those who do the will of my Father Who is in Heaven.”
2) The Christian way lies in performance, not just promise, and the mark of a Christian is obedience, graciously and courteously given.

Memorial of Saint Lucy, Virgin and Martyr

USCCB VIDEO - REFLECTION

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

The context: Jesus entered Jerusalem, which was to be the scene of all the Passion events he had predicted. After he had cleansed the Temple with prophetic indignation and had started teaching in the Temple area, the priests and the elders approached him and asked for his credentials to teach. Jesus used the parable of two imperfect and disobedient sons to give them a wake-up call. Through this parable, Jesus gave them the warning that, because of their pride and their refusal to obey God’s call to repentance, they would exclude themselves from God’s Kingdom, while the tax-collectors and sinners would repent of their sins and would be accepted there.

In the parable, a man who has two sons tells both to go out to work in the vineyard.  The first says he will go but he does not. The second says he won’t go, but later regrets his refusal and goes to work. The second son who first refused to go to work in the vineyard represents the tax collectors and sinners, while the first son who agreed to work but did not go represents the scribes and the Pharisees. The parable gives us the warning that it is our final decision for or against God that is most important, because we are rewarded or punished according to it. The message of the story is crystal clear. There are two very common classes of people in this world. First, there are the people whose profession of Faith is much better than their practice. Second, there are those whose practice is far better than their profession. The ideal son for this parable would be a son who accepted the father’s orders with grace and respect and who unquestioningly and fully carried them out as Jesus did his Father’s will.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

FEATURED HOMILIES

Truth is the Anchor of Our Existence

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

What is your opinion? A man had two sons.

Periodically everyone should read and reread Muriel Rukeyser's Ballad of Orange and Grape; or, failing that, this gospel.
Do words mean anything? Does one's word mean anything? Having made a statement do I have to stand by it, or can I act as if I never said it? Can I deny having said it, or accuse someone of malice when they recall what I said?
I sometimes ask the question of the Veterans in recovery. "If you say to an AA group, 'My name is Joe and I am an alcoholic!' can you take it back?" Most agree that statement cannot be retracted. It's done. History might be reconsidered and rewritten but the past cannot be changed.

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Will I Have A Christmas?

ONE BREAD, ONE BODY

Prayer:  Father, prepare me for the best Christmas ever.

Promise:  "When John came preaching a way of holiness, you put no faith in him." —Mt 21:32

Praise:  St. Lucy refused to renounce Jesus, and was condemned to die in a house of prostitution. Jesus made her immovable, such that even a team of oxen was unable to drag her to the brothel.

TODAY'S REFLECTIONS (2022-1997)

SOURCE: Presentation Ministries

Video Homilies

Catholic TV Network

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Father Paul Ring preaches about how to avoid being trapped by spiritual blind spots, using the example of the martyr Saint Lucy.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

DECEMBER
WEDNESDAY


14

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Memorial

Morning Prayer – Memorial

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer – Memorial

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“Our hearts should be as much prepared for the coming of Christ as if he were still to come into this world.” (Saint Charles Borromeo)
“‘He must increase, but I must decrease’. This is John’s most difficult milestone, because the Lord had a manner that he hadn’t imagined. Because the Messiah has an easy-going style.” (Francis)
“When the Church celebrates the liturgy of Advent each year, she makes present this ancient expectancy of the Messiah, for by sharing in the long preparation for the Saviors’ first coming, the faithful renew their ardent desire for his second coming. By celebrating the precursor’s birth and martyrdom, the Church unites herself to his desire: ‘He must increase, but I must decrease’ (Jn 3:30)” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 524)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We need to learn how to survive a Faith-crisis: If John the Baptist, even after having had a direct encounter with Jesus the Messiah, could come to the point of question, doubt and revision of his Faith, then so can we.
2) Let us remember the truth that all our Christian dogmas are based on our trust and Faith in the Divinity of Jesus who taught them. It is up to us to learn our Faith in depth and to remove our doubts.

Memorial of Saint John of the Cross, Priest and Doctor of the Church

USCCB VIDEO - REFLECTION

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

The context: John the Baptist sent a few of his disciples to Jesus to clarify whether he was truly the fiery Messiah John had described, then introduced to the people. Jesus encouraged John the Baptist to cast away the popular expectations about the Messiah and simply to accept Jesus’ healing and preaching ministry as the fulfillment of the Messianic prophecy of Isaiah.

Explanations by Bible scholars as to why John sent his disciples to Jesus: 1) John knew that Jesus was the Christ and, as a prisoner, he wanted his disciples to follow Jesus as their new master. Jesus told them a prophecy from Isaiah to help them understand the purpose of his healing miracles.

2)  John began to doubt Jesus’ identity as the promised Messiah. The silent healing, preaching, saving, and empowering ministry of Jesus was a surprise to John and to those who expected a fire-and-brimstone Messiah. Nor did Jesus conform to popular Jewish beliefs about a wealthy, warrior-politician Messiah who would bring political, social, and economic deliverance to Israel. Instead, Jesus pronounced blessings on the poor in spirit, the meek, and peacemakers (5:1-11).  Jesus called the disciples to love their enemies (5:42-48).  Furthermore, Jesus moved away from Jerusalem, the home of the Temple and the center of religious authority and began preaching and healing in Galilee among the common people (4:12).  John had proclaimed the power of the coming Messiah to bring in a new age, and instead, he found himself imprisoned in the dungeon of Herod’s prison fortress at Machaerus, southeast of the Dead Sea, wondering why the expected Messiah was not setting him free as Isaiah (61:1) had predicted.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission
FEATURED HOMILIES

Waiting for Godot

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

John summoned two of his disciples and sent them to the Lord to ask,
“Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?”
When the men came to the Lord, they said,
“John the Baptist has sent us to you to ask,
‘Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?’”

My mother often came to visit me in Louisiana, and we toured every interesting site within a hundred miles. One weekend, I took her to see a college presentation of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot.

I tried to explain to her before we arrived that this “theater of the absurd” was a different kind of play. There is no plot to speak of. It’s not going anywhere; or not in the usual sense. She wouldn’t hear a word of it. “Don’t tell me anything about it!” She insisted. There should be no spoiler.

It wasn’t well done by these college students. They didn’t have that critical sense of timing so necessary to humor. Although they enjoyed the wonderful language, they saved the pleasure for themselves. They ripped through the lines so fast the audience missed its subtlety. There was no time to experience the existential anxiety beneath the waiting. There was some gender bending also as Didi was played by a woman.

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Jesus, the Blind, and Christmas

ONE BREAD, ONE BODY

Prayer:  Father, open my eyes to Your love, truth, and holiness. Open my eyes to the evil of sin and the hope of repentance.

Promise:  “Turn to Me and be safe, all you ends of the earth, for I am God; there is no other!” —Is 45:22

Praise:  St. John worked to enlighten his fellow monks to their need to reform. He endured brutality and intense persecution because he would not compromise the ideal that priests should be completely abandoned to Jesus.

TODAY’S REFLECTIONS (2022-1997)

SOURCE: Presentation Ministries

Video Homilies

Catholic TV Network

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Father Frank Silva preaches about recognizing that Jesus is the Messiah and being a constant witness to this. December 14, 2016 | Memorial of Saint John of the Cross, Priest and Doctor of the Church

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

 

DECEMBER
THURSDAY


15

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“You may mention Elias who was taken up into heaven, yet he is not greater than John. Enoch was translated, but he is not greater than John.” (Saint Cyril of Jerusalem)
“The Gospel says that John invited everyone to conversion. The Pharisees and doctors noticed the strength of John, he was a righteous man. They went to him and asked: are you the Messiah? John was clear and did not fall into the temptation of stealing the title. He was a man of truth and did not steal dignity of the Lord.” (Francis)
“John the Baptist is ‘more than a prophet’ (Lk 7:26) (…) ‘He on whom you see the Spirit descend and remain, this is he who baptizes with the Holy Spirit. and I have seen and have borne witness that this is the Son of God…. Behold, the Lamb of God.’ (Jn 1:33-36)” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 719)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We have the same mission as John the Baptist, namely, to bear witness to Christ the Messiah by our exemplary Christian lives in a world controlled by agnostic and atheistic media, by liberal and leftist politicians, and by liberal judges.
2) Hence, we, too, require grace and the courage of our Christian convictions to live a Sacramental life, and exercising a spirit of prayer.

Thursday of the Third Week in Advent

USCCB VIDEO - REFLECTION

SAINT OF THE DAY
FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

The context: Since Jesus’ ministry, as reported to John the Baptist, did not match with his expectations of a fiery Messiah, John wanted to clear his doubts. When he sent his disciples for this purpose, Jesus encouraged John the Baptist to cast away the popular political expectations about the Messiah and simply to accept his healing and preaching ministry as the fulfilling of the Messianic prophecy of Isaiah.  When John’s disciples had left, Jesus, paid the highest compliments to John the Baptist as his herald and the last of the prophets, and to the courage with which John had proclaimed his prophetic convictions. John completed the cycle of prophets begun by Elijah (Mt 11:13-14).  He had the moral courage to criticize the immoral life of Herod the king with prophetic conviction. He convinced the Jews of his time that they needed to repent and renew their lives to receive the long-expected Messiah into their midst. Then he introduced Jesus as “the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world“ (Jn 1:29), or the true Messiah who would redeem mankind from the bondage of sin. But Jesus declares that his followers are greater than John the Baptist, because by Baptism we are made children of God, heirs of Heaven and temples of the Holy Spirit.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

FEATURED HOMILIES

The Depth of Sorrow

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

For a brief moment I abandoned you, but with great tenderness I will take you back.
In an outburst of wrath, for a moment
I hid my face from you;

But with enduring love I take pity on you,
says the LORD, your redeemer.

Every time a Veteran in the hospital tells me he is divorced I feel a pang of sadness. Having never been married, I cannot imagine how deep that sadness must feel to him or her, but I’m sure no schoolchild ever resolved to grow up someday and be divorced. How dreadful that collapse of a dream must be.

And yet the story is so common we seem to take the sadness for granted. It’s just there, to be ignored like the excess weight in one’s body or the smoker’s shortness of breath.
Perhaps divorce is the reason why millions of shoppers rush the stores on Black Friday to spend billions of dollars on stuff that no one needs. It salves the pain that we’d rather not think about.

Perhaps divorce is why 22 Veterans kill themselves every day, and the reason we rushed into those pointless wars in the first place. Perhaps that’s why many people die of drug abuse and alcoholism; while others abort unwanted babies.

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Looking for Love

ONE BREAD, ONE BODY

Prayer:  Father, may I look to You for love, not to the world.

Promise:  “I assure you, there is no man born of woman greater than John. Yet the least born into the kingdom of God is greater than he.” —Lk 7:28

Praise:  Counting a friendship as worth more than money, Thomas forgave the loan his friend had promised to repay.

TODAY’S REFLECTIONS (2022-1997)

SOURCE: Presentation Ministries

Video Homilies

Catholic TV Network

YouTube player


Father Brian Clary preaches about not rejecting Jesus, but accepting Him. December 15, 2016 | Thursday of the Third Week in Advent

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

 

DECEMBER
FRIDAY


16

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
Coming Soon

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We should rejoice in all that God gives us in Scripture, in the Church and in natural revelation. But to benefit from these gifts of God, we must be humble before God. Let us make real effort to hear and grasp the message of these witnesses to Jesus, understanding the true significance of the Old Testament, John the Baptist and Jesus’ own words and works.

Friday of the Third Week in Advent

USCCB VIDEO - REFLECTION

SAINT OF THE DAY
TODAY'S CHRISTIAN ART
FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

The context: In today’s Gospel passage, Jesus is concluding his keynote address, recorded in John 5:19-30. Jesus challenges his doubting Jewish opponents. He presents three witnesses who confirm his identity and Divine authority.

First, Jesus presents John the Baptist, whom many Jews considered a prophet, as his human witness and compliments him, calling him a burning light radiating the light of God. Second, Jesus presents the miracles he works, the fulfillment of the Messianic prophecies, as his witness. They prove that the holy Scriptures are his witnesses. Third, Jesus brings God the Father as his witness because Jesus preaches and works signs as instructed by his Heavenly Father. He works signs to fulfill the Scriptures and in obedience to his Heavenly Father. Thus, John the Baptist, Holy Scriptures and his Heavenly Father are Jesus’ witnesses proving his Divine identity and authority.

The implications of our text for today are both comforting and challenging. That Jesus is the final and ultimate revelation of God by which we may judge all other revelation gives Christians confidence. The witnesses to Jesus mentioned in this text are all still available to us: The witness of the Old Testament is obviously still present, but so is the witness of the Baptist and the words and works of Jesus. The latter three come to us in the New Testament, not least in the Gospel of John. In addition, Christians have the witness of the Holy Spirit, who has enabled the Church to understand the revelation of God in Jesus. Faith in Jesus gives believers confidence, joy and peace because of Who He is – the unique Son of God, equal with God.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

FEATURED HOMILIES

Challenge of Foreigners Seeking Entrance

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

Let not the foreigner say,
when he would join himself to the LORD,
“The LORD will surely exclude me from his people.”

The United States is not alone in facing the challenge of foreigners seeking entrance to the nation. Nor is it a new crisis. Human beings have always wandered from place to place. We flee from famine, pestilence, disease, war and oppression. Always have, always will.

Nor is the Bible unfamiliar with this dimension of human life. The Jews would not allow their children to forget their history of wandering from “Ur of the Chaldees” to Egypt and back to Palestine. Though many returned from Babylon after the exile, some remained. Others had been scattered by the wars into northern Africa and western Europe. Nor would they lose track of those who had been carried away, fled or migrated to distant places. Their rabbis studied together and their pilgrimages brought them back to Jerusalem.

The Gospel has been announced throughout the world, beginning in synagogues throughout the Roman Empire. If you have not heard the gospel announced in a strange accent you might not know the gospel at all! Without an admixture of foreign ideas, experience and interpretations our reading of God’s word would be hopelessly bland, as flat as our provincial experience of life. This alienness belongs in our tradition as surely as the Hebrew and Greek languages belong to the Old and New Testaments. Without it we could not know the gospel which is announced to all people, nor could we belong to the Body of Christ which is a communion with people far and near.

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Christmas Rush

ONE BREAD, ONE BODY

Prayer:  Father, reveal to me any sin of mine.

Promise:  “For My house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples.” —Is 56:7

Praise:  Peter went to Confession during Advent to prepare himself for the Christ Child.

TODAY’S REFLECTIONS (2022-1997)

SOURCE: Presentation Ministries

Video Homilies

Catholic TV Network

YouTube player


Father Carlos Suarez preaches about speaking the truth, even when it is challenging, to welcome others to the Faith. December 16, 2016 | Friday of the Third Week in Advent

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

 

DECEMBER
SATURDAY


17

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer I

Night Prayer I

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“But it is of no avail to say that our Lord, the Son of the blessed Virgin Mary, was true and perfect man, if He is not believed to be Man of that stock which is attributed to Him in the Gospel.” (St Leo the Great)
“Joseph is the legal father of Jesus. Through him, Jesus belongs ‘legally’, to the house of David. And yet he comes from elsewhere, ‘from above’ Only God is truly his ‘father’.” (Benedict XVI)
“God called Joseph to ‘take Mary as your wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit’ (Mt 1:20), so that Jesus, ‘who is called Christ’, should be born of Joseph’s spouse into the messianic lineage of David (Mt 1:16)” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 437)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We need to accept and support, lift up, and correct the bad members of our family, acknowledging the truth that every family has some black sheep. Jesus’ genealogy mentions a harlot named Rahab, an adulteress named Tamar and a Moabite Gentile woman named Ruth. We need to remember that God can bring good out of the worst persons and circumstances. We need to appreciate our membership in the Divine family of God by Baptism and behave as holy children of a Holy God.

Saturday of the Third Week in Advent

USCCB VIDEO - REFLECTION

SAINT OF THE DAY
FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

The context: Starting with a genealogy was the Jewish way of beginning a biography because the Jews gave importance to the purity of the lineage which made them part of God’s Chosen People. For a noble Jew, the line must be traceable back through five generations, and for a Jewish priest traceable back to Aaron. Matthew presents Jesus’ human ancestry, indicating that salvation history has reached its climax with the birth of the Son of God through Mary by the working of the Holy Spirit. The Jewish genealogies followed the male line.  Hence, Joseph, as the husband of Mary, was the legal father of Jesus, and the legal father was on a par with the real father regarding rights and duties. Thus, it is through Joseph, His legalfather, that Jesus became the descendant of David. Since the Jews generally married within their clan, the early Fathers of the Church believed that Mary also belonged to David’s family. As a legal son of David, Jesus is the fulfillment of prophecies. The genealogy of Jesus Christ in today’s Gospel is carefully arranged into three groups of fourteen generations each. The three groups are based on 1) the rise of Israel to a great kingdom under David and Solomon, 2) the fall of the nation in the Babylonian exile and 3) the raising of the nation after the exile. The three groups symbolically represent the creation of man in God’s image, the loss of man’s greatness in Adam’s sin and the regaining of greatness through Christ Jesus.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission
FEATURED HOMILIES

The Octave Before Christmas

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

Thus the total number of generations from Abraham to David is fourteen generations; from David to the Babylonian exile, fourteen generations; from the Babylonian exile to the Christ, fourteen generations.

Today the Church begins its observance of the octave before Christmas, a period of more intensely eager waiting. Beginning with Saint Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus we hear for these eight days selections from the “infancy narratives” of Matthew’s and Luke’s gospels.

I am especially delighted by today’s reading gospel (though I much prefer the more accurate word begot to the peculiarly bland expression, became the father of…)

I have been fascinated in the last few months by the way our tradition addresses the mystery of time. Of all God’s creatures only human beings are aware of time. (And angels, perhaps.) Other earthly creatures may bear scars of the past and, as individuals have memories; but only the human being can locate itself in this present moment between the past (which is unchangeable,) and the future, (which is unknown.) A dog remembers cruelty or kindness within his own experience but he will never comprehend the history and traditions of his experience. A basset hound might sense her relationship to a chihuahua but have no conception of breeding.

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The Tree of Life

ONE BREAD, ONE BODY

Prayer:  Lord Jesus, may the ornament of my life bring a smile to Your lips, fruit for Your kingdom, and joy to Your heart.

Promise:  “In Him shall all the tribes of the earth be blessed; all the nations shall proclaim His happiness.” —Ps 72:17

Praise:  “O Wisdom, O holy Word of God, You govern all creation with Your strong yet tender care.”

TODAY’S REFLECTIONS (2022-1997)

SOURCE: Presentation Ministries – One Bread, One Body

Video Homilies

Fr. Warner D’Souza

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