Daily Homilies — December 5-10, 2022

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies
MONDAY 5TUESDAY 6WEDNESDAY 7THURSDAY 8FRIDAY 9SATURDAY 10

DECEMBER
MONDAY


5

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“The Lord is great: because of some He forgives others.” (St Ambrose)
“And let us always go ahead, seeking the Lord, seeking new paths. And were it necessary to open a hole in the roof, may our charitable and creative imagination lead us to this: to find and create paths of encounter, paths of brotherhood, paths of peace.” (Francis)
“Jesus hears the prayer of faith, expressed in words (the leper; Jairus; the Canaanite woman; the good thief) or in silence (the bearers of the paralytic; the woman with a hemorrhage who touches his clothes). Jesus always responds to a prayer offered in faith.” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 2616)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We need God’s forgiveness to live wholesome lives.  The heart of the Christian Faith is the “forgiveness of sins.”  In the Creed we say, “I confess one Baptism for the forgiveness of sins.”  While we have the power to forgive others, we need to be forgiven ourselves by the One who has the authority to forgive.  In Jesus we see this authority, the same authority He gave to his Apostles and so to his Church.
2) Today’s Gospel gives us an invitation to open ourselves to God’s forgiveness in the Sacrament of Reconciliation, and to hear, in the priest’s spoken words of absolution, the Voice of Jesus speaking to the paralytic: “Your sins are forgiven.”
3) The Gospel also instructs us to forgive others their sins against us and to ask God’s forgiveness for our daily sins every day of our lives.

Monday of the Second Week of Advent

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FEATURED HOMILIES

Jesus Has the Power

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

…and the power of the Lord was with him for healing. 

Perhaps we take it for granted that the power of the Lord was with Jesus but Saint Luke does not. We might suppose Jesus is God and can do whatever he wants whenever he wants. He has THE POWER and like Samantha in the 1960’s TV show Bewitched, he throws it around at will. Or, like Darth Vader, he might strangle his opponents if he were so inclined, without laying a hand on them.

Our religious imagination has been afflicted with these modern notions of Jesus’ authority. It’s something like “will power,” which many people suppose actually exists. When you wish upon a star, makes no difference who you; when you wish upon a star your dreams come true. 

Not.

If we’re going to practice faith in Jesus we’re going to have to discipline our assumptions and pet notions by the traditions and teachings of our religion. Neither Jesus nor any of his contemporaries watched television; nor had they ever heard of will power. That imaginary notion belonged to Enlightenment philosophers who never managed to connect their idea of a soul to something that exists in the real world. It came to be known as the “ghost in the machine.”

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Father Edward Riley preaches about being spiritually renewed, especially through the sacrament of Confession, to prepare for Jesus during Advent.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

The context: Beyond showing Divine authority over temptation, over the lives of men, over nature, over demons and over sickness, in today’s Gospel we see Jesus demonstrating a new form of Divine authority – the authority to forgive sins: Jesus offers a miraculously restored paralyzed man to health as proof. The healing episode presents Jesus as God Incarnate, sent to save us, restore us, and make us new. So we have to look beyond the boundaries of our religious experience if we are to appreciate the healing and forgiving operation of our God in newer and newer ways.

Many kinds of sickness were seen by the Jews as punishment for one’s personal sin or the sins of one’s parents.  This man’s paralysis was also seen by the people around him as a punishment for some sin in his own life or in the lives of his parents.  It was a common belief that no sickness could be cured until sin was forgiven.  For that reason, Jesus had first to convince the paralyzed man that his sins had been forgiven. Once Jesus granted the paralytic the forgiveness of God, the man knew that God was no longer his enemy, and he was able to receive the cure which followed.  It was the manner of the cure which scandalized the Scribes.   By forgiving sin, they thought Jesus had blasphemed, insulting God, because forgiving sin is the exclusive prerogative of God. In addition to showing Jesus’ own direct connection to God, this healing demonstrates the fact that we can never be right physically until we are right spiritually, that health in body and peace with God go hand in hand.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

DECEMBER
TUESDAY


6

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“Where do you feed, good Shepherd, you who take the entire flock upon your shoulders?. Show me the verdant place. Lead me to the nourishing grass. Call me by name that I may hear your voice, I who am your sheep.” (St Gregory of Nyssa)
“A person is comforted when he feels the Lord’s mercy and forgiveness. The joy of the Church is to `give birth’, to come out of herself in order to give life, to go out in search of those sheep who are lost.” (Pope Francis)
“When he celebrates the sacrament of Penance, the priest is fulfilling the ministry of the Good Shepherd who seeks the lost sheep, of the Good Samaritan who binds up wounds, of the Father who awaits the prodigal son and welcomes him on his return, and of the just and impartial judge whose judgment is both just and merciful. The priest is the sign and the instrument of God’s merciful love for the sinner.” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 1465)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We need to confess our sins to regain peace and Gods friendship.  We have to be humble enough to recognize that we need God’s forgiveness to be whole. If we have been in sin, our God is ready to receive and welcome us back, just as Jesus welcomed sinners in his time.   Let us pray today that we may allow God’s love and forgiveness into our lives.
2)   We should also ask God for the courage  to  extend  this  forgiveness  to  others  who  have offended us.  As we continue with the celebration of the Holy Mass, let us pray also for God’s Divine Mercy on those who have fallen away from grace.

Tuesday of the Second Week of Advent

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FEATURED HOMILIES

Charitable Works?

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

A voice cries out:
In the desert prepare the way of the LORD!
Make straight in the wasteland a highway for our God!
Every valley shall be filled in,
every mountain and hill shall be made low;
The rugged land shall be made a plain,
the rough country, a broad valley.
Then the glory of the LORD shall be revealed,
and all people shall see it together;
for the mouth of the LORD has spoken.

Religious  in particular must hear the cry of the poor which demands recognition and respect. Perhaps we’re all aware of the tens of thousands of losing Super Bowl sweatshirts that are dumped into third world markets as “donations.” The manufacturers have created shirts for both teams, instantly ready to market to whichever fans are victorious. The losing shirts will be donated as tax write-offs. Woo-hoo!

I am reminded of the fellow who was looking for something under the street light. A passerby asked, “Did you lose something?”
“Yes,” he said, “I’ve lost my keys.’
“I’ll help you look!” but after a few minutes — “I don’t see them. Are you sure you lost them here?”
“No, I lost them back there in the alley.”
“Then why are we looking here?”
“The light is better here.”

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Father Jean Aubin preaches about showing real courage and commitment to Christ this Advent season as we prepare for His coming.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

The context: Since the self-righteous Pharisees who accused Jesus of befriending publicans and sinners could not believe that God would be delighted at the conversion of sinners, Jesus told them the parable of the lost sheep and the shepherd’s joy on its discovery, the parable of the lost coin and the woman’s joy when she found it, and the parable of the lost and returned son and his Father’s joy on his return.   These three parables defended Jesus’ alliance with sinners and responded to the criticism that he was welcoming tax collectors and sinners. The central theme of today’s Gospel is that our God is loving, patient, merciful, and forgiving.    This parable reminds us that we have a God who welcomes sinners and forgives their sins when they return to Him with genuine contrition and resolution to amend their lives.

Shepherding in Judaea was a hard, dangerous task.  Pasture was scarce; thorny scrub jungles with wild animals, and vast desert areas were common, posing constant threats to the wandering sheep.  But the shepherds were famous for their dedicated, sacrificial service, perpetual vigilance, and readiness for action.    Two or three shepherds might be personally responsible for the sheep owned by several families in a village.   If any sheep were missing, one of the shepherds would go in search of it, sending the other shepherds home with the flock of sheep. The whole village would be waiting for the return of the shepherd with the lost sheep and would receive him with shouts of joy and of thanksgiving.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

DECEMBER
WEDNESDAY


7

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Memorial

Morning Prayer – Memorial

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer I – Solemnity

Night Prayer I

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
Coming Soon

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) We need to be freed from unnecessary burdens: Jesus is interested in lifting off our backs the burdens that drain us and suck the life out of us, so that he can place around our necks his own yoke and his burden, that bring to us, and to others through us,  new  life,  new energy, new joy.
2) We need to unload our burdens before the Lord. One of the functions of worship for many of us is that it gives us a time for rest and refreshment, when we let the overheated radiators of our hectic lives cool down before the Lord. This is especially true when we unload the burdens of our sins and worries and evil addictions on the altar and offer them to God during the Holy Mass.

Memorial of Saint Ambrose, Bishop and Doctor of the Church

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Are There Any Limits to Power?

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

Do you not know
or have you not heard?
The LORD is the eternal God,
creator of the ends of the earth.
He does not faint nor grow weary,
and his knowledge is beyond scrutiny.

Are there any limits to power? The philosopher Nietzsche, speaking more as a prophet than a teacher, recognized Europe’s shift from the worship of God to the worship of power. Stripped of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, the enlightened god of humanism had melted into its own irrelevance.
Power needs no justification. It is what it is, and you either deal with it or die under it. Millions of people have died in the senseless wars of the last three centuries.

Even yet many Christians like to think of our God as “all powerful.” He may be wise or good or beautiful but if he is not powerful they have no use for him. They have not gone to Bethlehem to see the helpless infant. They have not pondered Saint Paul’s song, “Though he was in the form of God he did not deem equality with God something to be grasped.”<

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Father Chris Peschel preaches on the witness of Saint Ambrose, and how we can look to him for inspiration during the Advent season.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

The context: In todays Gospel, Jesus offers rest to those who labor and are burdened, if they are ready to accept his easy yoke and light burden. For the Orthodox Jew, religion was a matter of burdens,namely, 613 Mosaic laws and thousands of oral interpretations, which dictated every aspect of life. Jesus invites the overburdened Israel, and us, to take his yoke upon our shoulders. In Palestine, ox-yokes were made of wood and were carved to fit the ox comfortably. The yoke of Christ can be seen as the sum of our Christian responsibilities and duties. Jesusyoke is light because it is given with love. It is the commandment to love others as Jesus did.  Besides, the yoke of Christ is not just a yoke from Christ but also a yoke with him. So, we are not yoked alone to pull the plow by our own unaided power. We are yoked together with Christ to work with him using his strength. Jesus is inviting each one of us to be yoked with him, to unite our life with him, our will with his will, our heart with his heart. By saying that his yoke is easy, Jesus means that whatever God sends us is made to fit our needs and our abilities exactly.

The second part of Jesusclaim is: “My burden is light.”  Jesus does not mean that his burden is easy to carry, but that it is laid on us in love. This burden is meant to be carried in love, and love makes even the heaviest burden light.  By following Jesus, one will find peace, rest, and real refreshment. We are burdened with many things:  business, concerns about jobs, marriage, money, health, children, security, old age, and a thousand other things. Jesus is asking us to give him our burdens and take on his yoke. By telling us, “Take my yoke . . . and you will find rest,” Christ is asking us to do things the Christian way. When we are centered in God, when we follow Gods commandments, we have no heavy burdens.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

DECEMBER
THURSDAY


8

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Solemnity

Morning Prayer – Solemnity

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer II – Solemnity

Night Prayer II

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“God is the father of created things; and Mary is the mother of recreated things. For God begot Him by whom all things were made; and Mary gave birth to Him by whom all things were saved.” (Saint Anselm)
“The angel’s greeting is interwoven with threads from the Old Testament. Mary is the shoot which sprouts from the stump of David in the dark winter night of history: from her sprouts the tree of redemption. God has not failed, as it might seem at the beginning of history: God saved and saves his people.” (Benedict XVI)
The “splendor of an entirely unique holiness” by which Mary is “enriched from the first instant of her conception” comes wholly from Christ: she is “redeemed, in a more exalted fashion, by reason of the merits of her Son.” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 492)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) Every mother wants her children to inherit or acquire all her good qualities. Hence, our Immaculate and holy Heavenly Mother wants us to be holy and pure children.
2) Let us honor her by practicing her virtues of Faith and obedience.
3) Let us respond to God’s grace by using it to do good to others.

Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary

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FEATURED HOMILIES

To honor Mary we have to put aside the urge to idealize her

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

In him we were also chosen, destined in accord with the purpose of the One who accomplishes all things according to the intention of his will, so that we might exist for the praise of his glory, we who first hoped in Christ.

To honor Mary we have to put aside the urge to idealize her. “Ideals” is a Greek notion; the language served to announce the Gospel but ideals, by definition, are not real. To put it another way, Plato regarded ideals as the only reality, in contradistinction from every day life which is never ideal.

The Hebrew mind has no truck with ideals; it is a fantasy world without substance. Rather, the Hebrew finds wholeness in the ordinary human experience of blood, sweat and tears, of grime and dirt, of hard work, friendship, boredom, pleasure and grief.

We do not honor Mary by comparing ourselves to her. Rather we see her as our sister and mother; we admire her as one whom the Lord filled with grace and honored with the singular vocation of Immaculate Conception.

Setting aside that temptation to idealize her, we discover in our own hearts the grace which has…

…destined us for adoption to himself through Jesus Christ, in accord with the favor of his will, for the praise of the glory of his grace that he granted us in the beloved. In him we were also chosen, destined in accord with the purpose of the One.

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Father Philip Dabney preaches about God’s compassion in sending Jesus to be born of the Blessed Virgin Mary. December 8, 2016 | Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Mary’s prophecy, given in her Magnificat,Behold all generations will call me blessed,” was fulfilled when the Catholic Church declared four dogmas of Faith about her: 1-The Immaculate Conception, 2-The Perpetual Virginity, 3-The Divine Maternity, 4-The Assumption. The Immaculate Conception is a dogma based mainly on Christian tradition and theological reasoning. It was defined in 1854 by Pope Pius IX as a dogma of Faith through Ineffabilis Deus. Definition: From the first moment of her conception, Mary was preserved immune from original sin by the singular grace of God and by virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ, Savior of the human race. (CCC #491). This means that original sanctity, innocence and justice were conferred upon her, and that she was exempted from all the evil effects of original sin, excluding sorrow, pain, disease and death which are temporal penalties given to Adam. (Catholic Encyclopedia).

Basis on Tradition and the Bible:

(A) Basis in Church tradition: The Immaculate Conception is a dogma originating from sound Christian tradition. Monks in Palestinian monasteries started celebrating the feast of the Conception of Our Lady by the end of the 7th century. The feast spread as the Feast of the Immaculate Conception in Italy (9th century), England (11thcentury), and France (12th century). Pope Leo VI propagated the celebration, and Pope Sixtus IV approved it as a Feast. Finally, in 1854, Pope Pius IX declared the Immaculate Conception to be a dogma of Faith. Mary herself approved this in 1858 by declaring to Bernadette at Lourdes, “I am the Immaculate Conception.”

(B) Basis in Holy Scripture: 1) God purified the prophet Jeremiah in the womb of his mother (Jer 1:5  –“Before I formed you in the womb of your mother I knew you and before you were born, I consecrated you”), and anointed John the Baptist with His Holy Spirit before John’s birth as John’s mother attests.  (Lk 1:43-44 – “And how does this happen to me, that the Mother of my Lord should come to me? For at the moment the sound of your greeting reached my ears, the infant in my womb leaped for joy.” Hence, it is reasonable that God kept the mother of His Son free from all sins from the first moment of her origin. 2) The angel saluted Mary as full of grace.” The greeting means that she was never, even for a moment, a slave of sin and the devil. 3) Gn 3:15 — “I will put enmity between you and the woman and between your seed and hers; He will strike at your head while you strike at His heel.” The woman stands for Mary, and the promise would not be true if Mary had original sin.

C)-Basis in reasoning: 1-If we were allowed to select our mother, we would select the most beautiful, healthy and saintly lady. So did God. 2-The All-Holy God cannot be born from a woman who was a slave of the devil, even for a moment in her life. “Deus potuit, decuit, fecit.” (Don Scotus).

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

DECEMBER
FRIDAY


9

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“Therefore, God, seeing the world falling into ruin because of fear, continuously acts to recall it with love, invite it back by grace, hold it tight in charity, and embrace it with affection.” (St. Peter Chrysologus)
“God offers to humanity, which no longer has time for him, further time, in order to set out anew on a journey to rediscover the meaning of hope. God loves us and for this very reason expects that we return to him, that we open our hearts to his Love.” (Benedict XVI)
““No one has ascended into heaven but he who descended from heaven, the Son of man” (Jn 3:13). Left to its own natural powers humanity does not have access to the `Father’s house’ (Jn 14:2), to God’s life and happiness. Only Christ can open to man such access.” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 661)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) Jesus’ parable about disappointed playmates challenges us to examine ourselves to see if we are buffet Catholics with selective hearing, so that we hear only what we want to hear. Jesus’ message of the kingdom of God is Good News and it produces true joy and spiritual freedom for those who will listen, but it is also a warning for those who refuse to listen and close their minds.
2) Hearing the Gospel implies the total acceptance and assimilation of what we hear and the incorporation of it into our daily lives. Like the generation of Jesus’ time, our age is marked by indifference and contempt, especially in regard to the things of Heaven.  Indifference dulls our ears to God’s voice and to the Good News of the Gospel. Only the humble of heart can find joy and favor in God’s grace.

Friday of the Second Week of Advent

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The Stranger

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they said, ‘He is possessed by a demon.’
The Son of Man came eating and drinking and they said, ‘Look, he is a glutton and a drunkard,
a friend of tax collectors and sinners.’
But wisdom is vindicated by her works.”

The Stranger often appears in our American stories. I am thinking of the Lone Ranger, Kung Fu, and High Plains Drifter. They come from somewhere else, straighten out our mess, and then disappear again.

“Who was that masked man?” someone always asked at the end of the cowboy episode. The answer, as I recall, “Why, don’t you know? That was the Lone Ranger.” I never knew till years later that the Texas Rangers are the state police. I assumed they were all like “Strider” from the Trilogy of the Rings, who would finally be revealed as “Aragorn, the rightful king of Gondor.”

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Father Walter Carreiro preaches about how we are known by our works, just as John the Baptist and Jesus were. December 9, 2016 | Friday of the Second Week in Advent

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FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

The context: The message of John the Baptist and the message of Jesus fell on deaf ears and met with stiff resistance from the self-righteous Scribes and the Pharisees  because of their jealousy, prejudice, and spiritual blindness. Hence, they attributed the austerities of John the Baptist to the devil and Jesus’ table fellowship with sinners as the behavior of a glutton and a drunkard, evidence contraindicating any Messianic possibility.  In today’s Gospel, Jesus compares these Scribes and Pharisees to irresponsible street-children.

Dog-in-the-manger attitude: Jesus compares the attitude of the Scribes and the Pharisees to that of street-children who want to entertain themselves by playing wedding and funeral songs. They divide themselves into two groups. But when one group proposes to sing wedding songs and asks the other group to dance, the second group will propose funeral songs and ask the first group to carry one of them on their shoulders as they act out a funeral procession. In the end both groups will be frustrated. Jesus states that the Scribes and Pharisees act exactly like these irresponsible and immature children because of their pride and prejudice. Jesus criticizes the unbelieving Jews for not listening either to John the Baptist, who preached a message of austerity and repentance, or to Jesus preaching the Good News of love, mercy, and salvation.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

DECEMBER
SATURDAY


10

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer I

Night Prayer I

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET
“It is intolerable for love not to see the object of its longing. That is why whatever reward they merited was nothing to the saints if they could not see they Lord. It gave Moses the temerity to say: If I have found favor in your eyes, show me your face.” (St Peter Chrysologus)
“Elijah was granted a transformed version of the Sinai experience: He experienced God passing by, not in the storm or in the fire or in the earthquake, but in the still small breeze. That transformation is completed here. God’s power is now revealed in his mildness, his greatness in his simplicity and closeness.” (Benedict XVI)
“John is ‘Elijah (who) must come.’ (Mt 17:10-13). The fire of the Spirit dwells in him and makes him the forerunner of the coming Lord. In John, the precursor, the Holy Spirit completes the work of ‘[making] ready a people prepared for the Lord.’ (Lk 1:17).” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 718)

Life
Messages

Courtesy  Fr. Tony’s Homilies
1) Let us accept Jesus as our Lord and Savior, Who became our Messiah by dying for us on the cross.
2) We do so by cooperating with our Savior in our eternal salvation, by obeying Jesus’ commandment of love and by following the instructions given by the Church Jesus founded.

Saturday of the Second Week of Advent

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Come

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

Why do the scribes say that Elijah must come first?”
He said in reply, “Elijah will indeed come and restore all things; but I tell you that Elijah has already come,

Yesterday and today I notice the word come in our gospel readings. Advent is all about the coming of the Christ, the Anointed One.

Anointed refers to anyone who is sent by God the Father, whether as prophet, priest or king. We understand Jesus as all three. As prophet of God he speaks of justice and mercy; as priest he gives himself to the Father on our behalf; as the descendant of David he assumes a royal throne, albeit a cross, and reigns over the Universe.

We have to notice also that the Messiah who is sent by God is accompanied by the Spirit, whom God has sent. Whenever we say the name Jesus with his title Christ, we acknowledge the Holy Spirit which impels him.

In today’s gospel, his disciples question Jesus about the popular belief that Elijah must come first before the Messiah will appear. You remember that Elijah had not died in the ordinary way of mortals. He had disappeared in a fiery chariot as his disciple Elisha watched in amazement. The chariot with its angelic horses disappeared into the sky with the firebrand Prophet. If many felt safer for his disappearance they were nonetheless uneasy about his possible return. I have heard that Jewish women warn unruly children that Elijah will get ya if ya don’t watch out. 

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Fr. Warner D’Souza

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FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

The context: Today’s Gospel describes the warning and instruction given by Jesus to Peter, James, and John as they were coming down the mountain after witnessing Jesus’ Transfiguration. Jesus forbade them to give any publicity to what they had seen, because people were expecting a conquering political messiah with Elijah as his forerunner, and a powerful reformer who would destroy evil and restore justice in the land for the Messiah to rule.

The Expected Messiah. Then Jesus indicated that He was the expected Messiah, and that John was the Elijah they had been waiting for. John’s mission had been to prepare the way for the first coming of the Messiah, as Elijah’s mission would be to prepare the world for the Messiah’s second coming at the end of the world. The scribes misunderstood and taught that Elijah would come before the first coming of the Messiah. But Jesus told the disciples that (for those who were willing to believe it), John the Baptist had served as Jesus’ Elijah in announcing and preparing the people to receive a Messiah, who would fulfill  the Messianic mission not by political power, but by suffering and death.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission