Daily Homilies (November 21-26)

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies

Daily Homilies
MONDAY 21TUESDAY 22WEDNESDAY 23THURSDAY 24FRIDAY 25SATURDAY 26
NOVEMBER
MONDAY

21

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Memorial

Morning Prayer – Memorial

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer – Memorial

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET

Today the Church remembers the moment when the little Mary completely surrendered her heart to the Most High. Holy Mary was full of grace and without any hint of sin from the first moment of her conception in her mother’s womb, St. Anne. Evidently she was not aware of this status, but she certainly was fully unfailing.
The Christian tradition is convinced that Mary, being very young, decided to fully dedicate herself in soul and body to God. In fact, this is why in such day as today, but in 543, in Jerusalem, the dedication of the church of Holy Mary la Nueva took place.
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The Presentation of Blessed Virgin Mary, Feast

Mary Offers Her Whole Livelihood on the Altar of Calvary

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

He said, “I tell you truly,
this poor widow put in more than all the rest;
for those others have all made offerings from their surplus wealth,
but she, from her poverty, has offered her whole livelihood.”

The Memorial of the Presentation of Mary provides us with another opportunity to thank God for our Blessed Mother; and Saint Luke’s gospel, an appropriate vignette. She too has “offered her whole livelihood” on the altar of Calvary.

I was not enthrall of Mel Gibson’s movie about Jesus but I appreciated his portrayal of Mary, and I was especially touched by the words addressed to her, “See, Mother, I make all things new!” It’s a reference, of course, to the Book of Revelation and it reminds us that only the faithful can see what happened on that dreadful day.

Luke has placed this story about the woman and her copper coins after his arrival and entry in Jerusalem, in anticipation of his Last Supper, arrest, trial and crucifixion. The Hour of Judgment is approaching and the wheat is being sifted out of the chaff.

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Video Homilies

Catholic TV Network

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Father Joseph Costantino preaches about the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary and how, through Mary, God was preparing us for our Savior.

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Father Michael Steele preaches about living a life of hope and charity as we prepare for the season of Advent. November 21, 2016 | Memorial of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Lk 21: 1-4,  & 50 This feast commemorates the presentation of the Blessed Virgin as a young girl in the Temple. (Mary’s house was in Nazareth, 95 miles away from Jerusalem which meant 4-5 days walking distance). Tradition holds that all young Jewish girls were left in the care of the Temple for a period, during which they were educated in reading Scriptures, singing liturgical songs and helping in the Temple. As with Mary’s birth, we read of Mary’s presentation in the Temple only in apocryphal literature.

The Protoevangelium of James (recognized as an unhistorical account), tells us that Anna and Joachim offered Mary to God in the Temple when she was very young. Later versions of the story (such as the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew and the Gospel of the Nativity of Mary), tell us that Mary was taken to the Temple at around the age of three in fulfillment of a vow made by her parents. Tradition held that she was to remain there to be educated in preparation for her role as Theotokos- Mother of God. This was to carry out her mother’s promise made to God when Anna was still childless.

The feast originated as a result of the dedication of the Basilica of Saint Mary the New, built in AD 543 by the Byzantines under Emperor Justinian I near the site of the ruined Temple in Jerusalem.  The feast originated in the Orient probably about the 7th century. The Eastern Orthodox church celebrates it on November 21 as one of its twelve “Great Feasts.” The feast which continued to be celebrated throughout the East, was being celebrated in the monasteries of Southern Italy by the ninth century. It was introduced into the Western Church in the 14th century. In the 1974 encyclical Marialis Cultus, Pope St. Paul VI (canonized by Pope Francis, October 14, 2018) wrote, “despite its apocryphal content, it presents lofty and exemplary values and carries on the venerable traditions having their origins in the Eastern Churches.”

Though it cannot be proven historically, Mary’s presentation has an important theological purpose. It continues the impact of the feasts of the Immaculate Conception and of the birth of Mary. It emphasizes that the holiness conferred on Mary from the beginning of her life on earth continued through her early childhood and beyond.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Life Messages

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Every Holy Mass in which we participate is our presentation. Although we were officially presented to God on the day of our Baptism, we present ourselves and our dear ones on the altar before God our Father through our Savior Jesus Christ at every Holy Mass. Hence, we need to live our daily lives with the awareness both that we are dedicated people consecrated to God and, therefore, that we are obliged to lead holy lives. We offer ourselves to God, asking to be made holy under the patronage of Mary and assisted by her powerful intercession and the union of her merits.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Saint of the Day

The Presentation of Blessed Virgin Mary, Feast

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NovEMBER
TUESDAY

22

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Memorial

Morning Prayer – Memorial

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer – Memorial

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET

“To prevent his disciples from questioning him about the time of his coming Christ said, ‘It is not for you to know the times or moments’. He hid the time from us so that we would be on the watch.” (Saint Ephrem)
“The end of the sacrifice, the destruction of the Temple, must have come as a tremendous shock. God, who had set down his name in the Temple, and thus in a mysterious way dwelt within it, had now lost his dwelling place on earth. The Old Testament had to be read anew.” (Benedict XVI)
“Jesus (…) identified himself with the Temple by presenting himself as God’s definitive dwelling-place among men. Therefore his being put to bodily death presaged the destruction of the Temple, which would manifest the dawning of a new age in the history of salvation: ‘The hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father’ (Jn 4:21).” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 586)
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Memorial of Saint Cecilia, Virgin and Martyr

The Great Winepress of God’s Fury

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

So the angel swung his sickle over the earth and cut the earth’s vintage. He threw it into the great wine press of God’s fury.

As a sixth-grader I used to walk the half-mile from school to home. One day I happened upon a vest pocket sized New Testament, probably the King James Version. That’s when I learned to read while walking; and I began, of course, at the end of the book, with “Revelation.”

The language and imagery are so compelling, even a sixth grader can read it. Whose imagination would not shudder with the imagery of an angel, sickle in hand, gathering the crops of wheat and grape? Who can misunderstand the threat of “the great wine press of God’s fury?”

It is nonetheless ironic that such a joyous pastoral image, the wine press, would signify God’s wrath. Saint John uses irony used with amazing effect, when he describes Jesus as clothed in purple, crowned with thorns, and hailed as king. Not only is he truly our king, he could appear as our Savior and Lord only by wearing a costume of suffering and mockery. We could not worship a Messiah decked out in gold, silver and ermine.

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Father Shawn Carey preaches about using the gifts God has given us and persevering in hope during difficult times.

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SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Gospel: Lk 21: 5-11 Context: Today’s Gospel begins with Jesus’ reaction to the comments the  disciples had been making about the splendor of the Temple in Jerusalem. The forty-foot tall pillars supporting the beams of the front porch were made of solid marble. Most of the decorations and the large vine on the front porch with six-foot long grape clusters were made of solid gold plates, while the dome was gold-plated. But Jesus prophesied this Temple’s total destruction. In AD 70, the Roman army invaded the city, plundered everything valuable, set fire to the Temple, pulled down the City’s walls, killed one million Jews, and took 97,000 healthy Jews as captives. Jesus also gave the disciples warnings about false military messiahs and their deceptive doctrines about overthrowing the Romans. Then Jesus listed some signs of the end of the world, like wars between nations, earthquakes, famines, plagues, and unnatural movements of the heavenly bodies.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Life Messages

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

We need to learn from the signs of the times, like crises in morality, a culture of death, an increase in violence and terrorism, the “normalization” of sexual deviations, the breaking down of families, and the moral degradation of society, and to prepare ourselves for the end times by living ideal Christian lives, helping others, sharing our blessings with others, getting and staying reconciled with God and our neighbors, and trusting in the living presence of Jesus in the Church .

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

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NovEMBER
WEDNESDAY

23

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET

“Patience is the root and protector of all virtues: it consists in suffering serenely the evils coming from others and in being tormented with no resentment against the one who inflicts them.” (Saint Gregory the Great)
“This is the grace for which we must ask: perseverance. And that the Lord may save us from fantasies of triumphalism. Triumphalism is not Christian, it is not of the Lord. The daily journey in the presence of God, this is the way of the Lord. Continue on the path.” (Francis)
“Martyrdom is the supreme witness given to the truth of the faith: it means bearing witness even unto death. The martyr bears witness to Christ who died and rose, to whom he is united by charity. He bears witness to the truth of the faith and of Christian doctrine…” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 2473)
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Wednesday of the 34th Week in Ordinary Time

The Song of the Lamb

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

“Great and wonderful are your works,
Lord God almighty.
Just and true are your ways,
O king of the nations.
Who will not fear you, Lord,
or glorify your name?
For you alone are holy.
All the nations will come
and worship before you,
for your righteous acts have been revealed.”

Songs need no explanation. As a child I sang “Ring around the rosie, pocket full of posies” without ever wondering what rosies or posies might be. More recently I got a kick out of All About that Bass though the words don’t seem to relate to its suggestions; or perhaps I’m in the dark because no one has dared to explain it to a priest. As the Christmas season comes I wonder how many people will ask, “What are cloven skies and unfurled wings?” They won’t ask; they’ll just sing.

Songs stand on their own with neither explanation nor apology, inviting everyone to sing along. And so we hear “those who had won the victory over the beast” singing the Song of the Lamb; their joyousness invites us to join in the chorus.

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Father Dan Mahoney reminds us that when we do what is right and of God, no other justification is needed.

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Father Carlos Suarez preaches about persevering in the faith, even when we face challenges.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Gospel: Lk 21: 12-19 Context: Today’s Gospel gives Jesus’ prophetic warning to the apostles and disciples about the sufferings they will have to bear for their Faith in Him until Jesus’ Second Coming. Jesus advises them to bear witness to Him in spite of persecutions, for those persecutions would also encourage the disciples to flee to remote places and to preach the Gospel among the Jews and the Gentiles. Believers, Jesus warns, will be locked up in prisons and brought for trial before kings and governors. Jesus assures them that the Holy Spirit will give them words of defense and witness-bearing. (In the Acts of the Apostles, we read how Stephen was given the wisdom to bear witness to Jesus in Jerusalem). Since there will be divisions in families between believers and non-believers, Jesus declares, close relatives will betray their Christian family members to the pagan authorities and cause their martyrdom. But Jesus assures the disciples in today’s Gospel passage that their suffering for Him will be amply rewarded.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Life Messages

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

1) Although we may not get a chance to die for the Faith, we are invited to face “dry martyrdom,” a “living death” as outcasts in our contemporary materialistic, secular, liberal, agnostic, and atheistic society.

2) We are called to bear witness to Christ by loving those who hate us, by showing mercy and compassion to those who hurt and ill-treat us, by forgiving those who continue to offend us, by accepting our sufferings without complaint, and by continuing to keep Jesus’ word in our lives.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Saint of the Day

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SOURCE: Celebrating the Saints | Catholic Faith Network
NovEMBER
THURSDAY

24

Divine
Office

About Today

Invitatory

Office of Readings – Memorial

Morning Prayer – Memorial

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer – Memorial

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET

“Wait, wait, for you know neither the day nor the hour. Watch with care, for everything passes quickly.” (Saint Teresa of Jesus)
“The cosmic elements pass away; the word of Jesus is the true ‘firmament’ beneath which we can stand and remain.” (Benedict XVI)
“Until everything is subject to him (I Cor 15:28), until there be realized new heavens and a new earth in which justice dwells, the pilgrim Church, in her sacraments and institutions, which belong to this present age, carries the mark of this world which will pass (…)” (Catechism Of The Catholic Church, Nº 671)
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Thanksgiving Day in the United States

Thanksgiving

Fr.  Ken Baretsch, OFM Conv

He will keep you firm to the end, irreproachable on the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is faithful, and by him you were called to fellowship with his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

As we celebrate Thanksgiving Day, two words of Saint Paul’s letter to the Corinthians stand out for me: faithful and fellowshipBecause God is faithful our fellowship abides; we remain as a church for one another throughout difficult times.

When Saint Paul wrote this letter to the Corinthians the word Trinity had not appeared in Christian discourse. It would not be heard until two hundred years later.

But passages like this contributed enormously to its discovery. One can sense the emergence of the doctrine in the words, “by him you were called to fellowship with his son, Jesus Christ our Lord.”

Saint Paul knows that the Father of Jesus will keep you firm and irreproachable, for he is faithful. Jesus is the Son of God, a title he can deserve only if there is Father who begets him. Finally the Holy Spirit appears in the word Christ. It means anointed and Jesus cannot be our Savior unless he is anointed as the Christ by the Holy Spirit.

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Introduction: Today is a day of national thanksgiving 1) for the blessings and protection God has given us; 2) for our democratic government and the prosperity, we enjoy; 3) for our freedom of speech and religion; and 4) for the generosity and good will of our people.

History: The winter of 1610 at Jamestown, Virginia, had reduced a group of 409 settlers to 60. The survivors prayed for help, without knowing when or how it might come. When help arrived in the form of a ship filled with food and supplies from England, a thanksgiving prayer meeting was held to give thanks to God. President George Washington issued the first national Thanksgiving Proclamation in 1789. President Abraham Lincoln, in the midst of the Civil War, established Thanksgiving Day as a formal holiday to express our thanks to God. In 1941 Congress passed the official proclamation declaring that Thanksgiving should be observed as a legal holiday the fourth Thursday of each November.

Biblical examples of thanksgiving

1) Today’s Gospel describes how one of the ten lepers Jesus healed, a Samaritan, returned to Jesus to express his gratitude, while the nine Jewish lepers did not think to thank God and the One He had used to heal. Jesus asks the pained question: ”Where are the other  nine?”  The episode tells us that God, too,  expects gratitude from us.

(2) In 2 Kgs 5:1-9 Naaman the leper, the chief of the army of the Syrian King, returned to the prophet Elisha to thank him for the complete disappearance of his leprosy, and he  offered Elisha  a gift of 10 talents of silver, 6000 pieces of gold and six Egyptian raiments. When Elisha refused the gift, Naaman asked for permission take home two sacks of the soil of Israel to remember the Lord Who healed him, and he promised to offer personal sacrifices only to the God of Israel.

3) Jesus’ example of thanksgiving at the tomb of Lazarus: “Thank you Father for hearing my prayer(Jn 11:42-42). (4) St. Paul’s advice, “Give thanks to God the Father for everything” (Eph 5:20).

The Eucharistic celebration is the most important form of thanksgiving prayer for Catholics. In fact, Eucharist is the Greek word for thanksgiving. In the Holy Mass we offer the sacrifice of Jesus to our Heavenly Father as an act of thanksgiving, and we surrender our lives on the altar with repentant hearts, presenting our needs and asking for God’s blessings.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Life Messages

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Let us be thankful and let us learn to express our thanks daily

a) To God for His innumerable blessings, providential care and protection, and for the unconditional pardon given to us for our daily sins and failures.

b) To our parents – living and dead – for the gift of life and Christian training and the good examples they gave us.

c) To our relatives and friends for their loving support and timely help and encouragement. d) To our pastors, teachers, doctors, soldiers, police and government officers for the sincere service they render us.


Saint of the Day

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SOURCE: Celebrating the Saints | Catholic Faith Network
NovEMBER
FRIDAY

25

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer

Night Prayer

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET

“Truth suffers, but never dies.” (Saint Teresa of Jesus)
“Time is not a reality extrinsic to GodT. Time was ‘touched’ by Christ, the Son of God and of Mary, and received from Him new and surprising meanings: it became the ‘salvific time’, namely, the definitive time of salvation and grace.” (Francis)
“(…) The Kingdom of God lies ahead of us. It is brought near in the Word incarnate, it is proclaimed throughout the whole Gospel, and it has come in Christ’s death and Resurrection (…)” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n 2,816)
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Friday of the 34th Week in Ordinary Time

Catholic TV Network

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Father Zimmerman preaches about how although Christ is with us, we are also still waiting for Him.

SOURCE: THE CATHOLIC TV NETWORK

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Lk 21:29-33 Context: Foretelling the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70, and the end of the world at an unspecified future time, Jesus warns the disciples in today’s Gospel that tribulations are inevitable before the Last Judgment and the coming of Jesus’ Kingdom.  Jesus uses the small parable of the fig tree to explain the point that we must be prepared for the time of tribulation, Jesus’ Second Coming, and the Last Judgment. Fig trees in Israel produce fruits twice a year, at Passover time and in autumn.  The sign of the ripening of their fruits is the appearance of fresh leaves on the tree. The Jews believed that the Messiah would appear during the Passover period, which coincides with the appearance of fresh leaves on fig trees.  The destruction of Jerusalem would be the end of their world for the Jews. So, the generation in AD 70 saw the end of the world symbolically.  Jesus wants us to understand that the Kingdom of God will be near when wars, natural calamities, pestilences, and unnatural movements of heavenly bodies occur. Except for the last-named, these seem to occur in every age. Hence, we must be ever vigilant and prepared.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Life Messages

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

1) We must be able to read the signs of the times and stay in the kingdom of God by faithfully doing God’s will every day of our lives.

2) We need to continue serving others in humility and love and bearing witness to Jesus through the integrity and transparency of our Christian lives.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Saint of the Day

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SOURCE: Celebrating the Saints | Catholic Faith Network
NOVEMBER
SATURDAY

26

Divine
Office

Invitatory

Office of Readings

Morning Prayer

Midmorning Prayer

Midday Prayer

Midafternoon Prayer

Evening Prayer I

Night Prayer I

Thoughts
on Today’s
Gospel

Courtesy of EVANGELI.NET

“Dear brothers, we must endure and persevere if we are to attain the truth and freedom we have been allowed to hope for” (Saint Cyprian)
“Nostalgia for slavery is nestled in our heart, because it is seemingly more reassuring than freedom, which is far more risky. How we like being captivated by lots of fireworks, beautiful at first glance but which in reality last but a few seconds.” (Francis)
“(…) The Letter to the Galatians contrasts the works of the flesh with the fruit of the Spirit: ‘Now the works of the flesh are plain: fornication, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry … drunkenness, carousing, and the like. I warn you, as I warned you before, that those who do such things shall not inherit the Kingdom of God.’ (Catechism of the Catholic Church, nº 1,852)
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Saturday of the 34th Week in Ordinary Time

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SOURCE: John Michael TalboT

FR. TONY's GOSPEL COMMENTARY

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

Lk 21:34-36 Context:  In St. Luke’s version of Jesus’ advice to the disciples before His passion and death, as given in today’s Gospel, Jesus emphasizes that every Christian needs to be vigilant and prepared because we cannot be sure of the time of our own death when we will be asked to give an account of our lives. Vigilance consists in obtaining strength from God through prayer, so that we may be freed from evil addictions and unnecessary attachment to worldly pleasures.  Jesus also instructs us to be vigilant because we do not know the time either of our own death or of the end of the world and Jesus’ Second Coming. St. Paul repeats this advice: “You are not in darkness, brethren, for that day to surprise you like a thief” (I Thes 5: 4). 

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

Life Messages

Courtesy of Fr. Kadavil at Fr. Tony’s Homilies

1) We need to avoid spiritual laziness and indifference.

2) We need to be freed from excessive and crippling anxiety, needless worries and evil habits.

3) We need to get our strength from God by prayer, which means listening to God and talking to Him.

SOURCE: Fr. Tony’s Homilies; Used with permission

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