31st Sunday in Ordinary Time C

October 30, 2022

INTRODUCTIONHOMILIESVIDEOSCOMMENTARYCHURCH FATHERSCATECHISMPAPAL HOMILIESANECDOTESDISCUSSION QUESTIONSCHILDREN SERMONSMUSIC

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Please be patient
as page loads

Images from the Readings

The Liturgy Centre

He wanted to see what Jesus was like

People grumbled

Seeking the lost

God’s great mercy and power

God chose you

Making Connections

Loyola Press

GRADES
1-3

Teach younger children that when we do wrong, we mend relationships not only by saying, “I am sorry” but also by changing our behavior, just as Zacchaeus promises to do in his encounter with Jesus.

GRADES
4, 5, and 6

In his encounter with Jesus, Zacchaeus experiences a change of heart, a conversion, and receives the gift of reconciliation. Children of this age are developing enough of a conscience that they, too, can experience a change of heart and seek the gift of reconciliation with those they have wronged.

GRADES
7-8

Young people at this age are learning to do many new things and in doing so make many mistakes. Because of this, they appreciate second chances. In this Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus gives Zacchaeus a second chance.

YouTube player


CATHOLIC KIDS MEDIA – God’s Love for Sinners! A fun Catholic reflection for kids based on the readings for the 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle C. This videos is from 2019. For most recent videos click here.

BISHOP MARK O’CONNELL

Intro to Luke 19:1-10
for Children

Click on chevron banner to access this week’s lesson.

THE KID’S BULLETIN

READ MORE

GOSPEL REFLECTION

Welcome God’s Love

By Lois Parker Edstrom

Objects suggested: Tape measure to demonstrate heights

No matter what our size, no matter that we are children or adults, we all have an opportunity to welcome Jesus into our lives.

Today let’s talk about being short. Kids know what it feels like to be short. All of us have been kids and experienced that. You may need help getting items from a tall shelf. And, when you are in a crowd you are unable to see what is beyond because of the taller people standing around you. You may need to be lifted onto your daddy’s shoulders to see a parade or other event.

While it may seem there are obstacles to being short, none of these minor annoyances are things that would stop you from accomplishing your goals. All through history people who are short have made great contributions and done many things to improve the world and help others. Short people have been outstanding astronauts, scientists, musicians, artists, athletes, to name a few.

READ MORE

SOURCE: THE SERMON WRITER
GOSPEL REFLECTION

People’s Differences
Do Not Matter to God

By Lois Parker Edstrom

Objects suggested: Pictures of snowflakes

We need to be modest about our accom- plishments and remember that we all make mistakes and we all have faults. 

We don’t all live in a place where it snows. But, snowflakes are so fascinating that it is good to think about them and learn about them. Snowflakes are made up of tiny ice crystals that usually have six sides. When the ice crystals move within a cloud and as they fall to the ground they branch out and grow. Here are some pictures of snowflakes. See what beautiful shapes they have? And, an interesting thing about snowflakes is that no two snowflakes are exactly alike.

We can say the same thing about people. No two people are exactly alike. Some of us may be short, others tall. Some have blue eyes, others brown. Some have curly hair, others straight. Some like to read, others like to run. Some are quiet, others are loud. We could go on and on listing our differences.

READ MORE

SOURCE: THE SERMON WRITER
FAMILY ACTIVITY

The “Turn Around” Game

by Larry Broding

Zacchaeus was a little man with a big reputation. As a head tax collector, he was treated as a cheat and a traitor by his fellow countrymen. And they were justified in their view. Imagine how shocked they were when Jesus welcomed him and he changed!

Zacchaeus repented. The Hebrew word for repentance is “shuv, ” which literally means to turn around and walk the other way. So, play the “Turn Around Game” with your family to get the meaning of repentance across. Tie a piece of yarn to the ankle of a family member, have he or she walk away from you several feet, then tug on the yarn as a signal to turn around and walk toward you. The tug on the foot is like God’s call to turn back to him. Just like Jesus tugged on the heart of Zacchaeus to return to God.

SOURCE: WORD SUNDAY

MORE ACTIVITIES

Please be patient
as page loads