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13th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B) Doctrinal Homily Outline

CENTRAL IDEA

THE RESURRECTION OF THE DEAD

By Kevin Aldrich

A few excerpts from Kevin Aldrich’s outline:

First Reading

  • What the author of Wisdom is really talking about is the death which results from sin, which is eternal separation from God. The author of sin and death is the devil, and when we sin we cooperate in the devil’s plan for our own destruction

Responsorial Psalm

  • It is a grave sin that some people plot the destruction of others and rejoice when they can harm them. This is an example of a “domain of the netherworld on earth” that the Book of Wisdom speaks of. Christ experienced this when the scribes and the Pharisees met together to plot how to put him to death. May God deliver us from such persons!

Second Reading

  • To go back to St. Augustine’s point, God put a marvelous potential in things. In human beings, he put the potential for supernatural life. This is a potential which is actualized by the grace of Christ, the new thing which has come.

Gospel

  • Thankfulness for the goodness we receive overflows in our graciousness toward other persons, especially other Christians in need. In Catholic social teachings, this is the principle of solidarity: it is the truth that we are all in this life together, and so we look out for one another, especially those in need. This is what the Gentile churches were doing in regard to the mother church in Jerusalem.
DOCTRINE

THE CHRISTIAN MEANING OF DEATH

The Vatican II document Gaudium and spes provides a sobering yet ultimate joyful exposition of the meaning of death.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION

PREPARATION FOR DEATH

How can we be ready for death? One way is the nightly examination of conscience and frequent sacramental Confession.

YEAR B CATECHISM THEMES

“The following paragraphs from the Catechism of the Catholic Church resonate with the biblical readings for this Sunday. They were chosen either because they cite or allude to the specific readings, or because they treat topics found in the readings.”  Homiletic Directory

Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 548-549, 646, 994: Jesus raises the dead
CCC 1009-1014: death transformed by Christ
CCC 1042-1050: hope for a new heaven and a new earth

JULY 2021

Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 2581-2584: prophets and conversion of heart
CCC 436: Christ as prophet
CCC 162: perseverance in faith
CCC 268, 273, 1508: power is made perfect in weakness

Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1506-1509: disciples share in Christ’s healing mission
CCC 737-741: Church called to proclaim and bear witness
CCC 849-856: origin and scope of the Church’s mission
CCC 1122, 1533: mission-mindedness
CCC 693, 698, 706, 1107, 1296: the Holy Spirit as God’s guarantee and seal
CCC 492: Mary as a unique example of being chosen before the foundation of the world

Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 2302-2306: Christ our peace
CCC 2437-2442: witnesses and workers for peace and justice

Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1335: the miracle of the loaves and fishes prefigures the Eucharist
CCC 814-815, 949-959: sharing of gifts in the communion of the Church

AUGUST 2021

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1333-1336: Eucharistic signs of bread and wine
CCC 1691-1696: life in Christ

Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1341-1344: “Do this in memory of me”
CCC 1384-1390: take and eat: Communion

Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1402-1405: the Eucharist, pledge of future glory
CCC 2828-2837: the Eucharist is our daily bread
CCC 1336: scandal

Twenty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 796: the Church as the Bride of Christ
CCC 1061-1065: God’s utter fidelity and love
CCC 1612-1617, 2360-2365: marriage in the Lord

Twenty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 577-582: Christ and the Law
CCC 1961-1974: the Old Law and the Gospel

SEPTEMBER 2021

Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1503-1505: Christ the Physician
CCC 1151-1152: signs used by Christ; sacramental signs
CCC 270-271: the mercy of God

Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 713-716: the path of the Messiah traced out in the “Servant Songs”
CCC 440, 571-572, 601: Jesus suffered and died for our salvation
CCC 618: our participation in Christ’s sacrifice
CCC 2044-2046: good works manifest faith

Twenty-fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 539, 565, 600-605, 713: Christ, obedient Servant of God
CCC 786: to serve is to reign
CCC 1547, 1551: priestly ministry as service
CCC 2538-2540: the sin of envy
CCC 2302-2306: safeguarding peace

Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 821, 1126, 1636: ecumenical dialogue
CCC 2445-2446, 2536, 2544-2547: the danger of immoderate riches
CCC 1852: jealousy

OCTOBER 2021

Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1602-1617, 1643-1651, 2331-2336: conjugal fidelity
CCC 2331-2336: divorce
CCC 1832: fidelity, a fruit of Spirit
CCC 2044, 2147, 2156, 2223, 2787: the fidelity of the baptized

Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 101-104: Christ, unique Word of Scripture
CCC 131-133: Scripture in life of the Church
CCC 2653-2654: Scripture as a fountain of prayer
CCC 1723, 2536, 2444-2447: poverty of heart

Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 599-609: Christ’s redemptive death in the plan of salvation
CCC 520: Christ’s self-emptying as an example for us to imitate
CCC 467, 540, 1137: Christ the High Priest

Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 547-550: Jesus performed messianic signs
CCC 1814-1816: faith, a gift of God
CCC 2734-2737: filial confidence in prayer

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 2083: commandments as a call for a response of love
CCC 2052, 2093-2094: the first commandment
CCC 1539-1547: holy orders in the economy of salvation

NOVEMBER 2021

Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 519-521: Christ gave his life for us
CCC 2544-2547: poverty of heart
CCC 1434, 1438, 1753, 1969, 2447: almsgiving
CCC 2581-2584: Elijah and conversion of heart
CCC 1021-1022: the particular judgment

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1038-1050: the Last Judgment; hope of a new heaven and a new earth
CCC 613-614, 1365-1367: Christ’s one perfect sacrifice and the Eucharist

Solemnity of Christ the King: Christ the origin and goal of history

CCC 440, 446-451, 668-672, 783, 786, 908, 2105, 2628: Christ as Lord and King
CCC 678-679, 1001, 1038-1041: Christ as Judge
CCC 2816-2821: “Thy Kingdom Come”


ADVENT – YEAR B

First Sunday of Advent

CCC 668-677, 769: the final tribulation and Christ’s return in glory
CCC 451, 671, 1130, 1403, 2817: “Come, Lord Jesus!”
CCC 35: God gives humanity grace to accept Revelation, welcome the Messiah
CCC 827, 1431, 2677, 2839: acknowledging that we are sinners

Second Sunday of Advent

CCC 522, 711-716, 722: the prophets and the expectation of the Messiah
CCC 523, 717-720: the mission of John the Baptist
CCC 1042-1050: a new heaven and a new earth

Third Sunday of Advent

CCC 30, 163, 301, 736, 1829, 1832, 2015, 2362: joy
CCC 713-714: characteristics of the awaited Messiah
CCC 218-219: God’s love for Israel
CCC 772, 796: the Church as the Bride of Christ

Fourth Sunday of Advent

CCC 484-494: the Annunciation
CCC 439, 496, 559, 2616: Jesus is the Son of David
CCC 143-149, 494, 2087: the “obedience of faith”

CHRISTMAS

The Solemnity of Christmas

CCC 456-460, 466: “Why did the Word become flesh?”
CCC 461-463, 470-478: the Incarnation
CCC 437, 525-526: the Christmas mystery
CCC 439, 496, 559, 2616: Jesus is the Son of David
CCC 65, 102: God has said everything in his Word
CCC 333: the incarnate Christ worshipped by the angels
CCC 1159-1162, 2131, 2502: the Incarnation and images of Christ

The Holy Family

CCC 531-534: the Holy Family
CCC 1655-1658, 2204-2206: the Christian family, a domestic Church
CCC 2214-2233: duties of family members
CCC 529, 583, 695: the Presentation in the Temple
CCC 144-146, 165, 489, 2572, 2676: Abraham and Sarah as models of faith

The Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God

CCC 464-469: Jesus Christ, true God and true Man
CCC 495, 2677: Mary is the Mother of God
CCC 1, 52, 270, 294, 422, 654, 1709, 2009: our adoption as sons
CCC 527, 577-582: Jesus submits to the Law, and perfects it
CCC 580, 1972: the New Law frees from restrictions of the Old Law
CCC 683, 689, 1695, 2766, 2777-2778: in the Holy Spirit we can call God “Abba”
CCC 430-435, 2666-2668, 2812: the name of Jesus

Second Sunday after the Nativity

CCC 151, 241, 291, 423, 445, 456-463, 504-505, 526, 1216, 2466, 2787: John’s Prologue
CCC 272, 295, 299, 474, 721, 1831: Christ the Wisdom of God
CCC 158, 283, 1303, 1831, 2500: God gives us wisdom

Solemnity of the Epiphany

CCC 528, 724: the Epiphany
CCC 280, 529, 748, 1165, 2466, 2715: Christ the light of the nations
CCC 60, 442, 674, 755, 767, 774-776, 781, 831: the Church, sacrament of human unity

ORDINARY TIME

Baptism of the Lord

The homiletic directory does not have any references for this Sunday

Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 462, 516, 2568, 2824: the Father’s will fulfilled in Christ
CCC 543-546: to welcome the Kingdom, welcome the Word of God
CCC 873-874: Christ the source of Christian vocation
CCC 364, 1004: the dignity of the body
CCC 1656, 2226: helping children discover their vocation

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 51-64: God’s plan of Revelation
CCC 1427-1433: inner, ongoing conversion
CCC 1886-1889: conversion and society

Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 547-550: Jesus accompanies words with miracles
CCC 447, 438, 550: Jesus’ power over demons
CCC 64, 762, 2595: the role of the prophet
CCC 922, 1618-1620: virginity for the sake of the Kingdom

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 547-550: healing as a sign of messianic times
CCC 1502-1505: Christ the Healer
CCC 875, 1122: the urgency of preaching

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1474: living in Christ unites all believers in him
CCC 1939-1942: human solidarity
CCC 2288-2291: respect for health

Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 1421, 1441-1442: Christ the healer of soul and body
CCC 987, 1441, 1741: Christ forgives sins
CCC 1425-1426: reconciliation after baptism
CCC 1065: Christ our “Amen”

Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 772-773, 796: the Church, the mystery of union with God
CCC 796: the Church as the Bride of Christ

Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 345-349, 582, 2168-2173: the Lord’s Day
CCC 1005-1014, 1470, 1681-1683: dying and living in Christ

Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 410-412: the Protoevangelium
CCC 374-379: man in paradise
CCC 385-409: the fall
CCC 517, 550: Christ as exorcist

LENT (FEB 21 – MAR 28)

First Sunday of Lent

CCC 394, 538-540, 2119: the temptation of Jesus
CCC 2846-2849: “Lead us not into temptation”
CCC 56-58, 71: the Covenant with Noah
CCC 845, 1094, 1219: Noah’s Ark prefigures the Church and baptism
CCC 1116, 1129, 1222: Covenant and sacraments (especially baptism)
CCC 1257, 1811: God saves through baptism

Second Sunday of Lent

CCC 554-556, 568: the Transfiguration
CCC 59, 145-146, 2570-2572: the obedience of Abraham
CCC 153-159: characteristics of faith
CCC 2059: God manifests his glory to make known his will
CCC 603, 1373, 2634, 2852: Christ is for us

Third Sunday of Lent

CCC 459, 577-582: Jesus and the Law
CCC 593, 583-586: Temple prefigures Christ; he is the Temple
CCC 1967-1968: the New Law completes the Old
CCC 272, 550, 853: Christ’s power revealed in the Cross

Fourth Sunday of Lent

CCC 389, 457-458, 846, 1019, 1507: Christ as Savior
CCC 679: Christ the Lord of eternal life
CCC 55: God wants to give man eternal life
CCC 710: Israel’s exile foreshadowed the Passion

Fifth Sunday of Lent

CCC 606-607: Christ’s life an offering to the Father
CCC 542, 607: Christ’s desire to give his life for our salvation
CCC 690, 729: the Spirit glorifies the Son, the Son glorifies the Father
CCC 662, 2853: Christ ascended in glory as our victory
CCC 56-64, 220, 715, 762, 1965: the history of the covenants

Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

CCC 557-560: Christ’s entry into Jerusalem
CCC 602-618: the Passion of Christ
CCC 2816: Christ’s kingship gained through his death and Resurrection
CCC 654, 1067-1068, 1085, 1362: the Paschal Mystery and the liturgy

Thursday of the Lord’s Supper

CCC 1337-1344: the institution of the Eucharist
CCC 1359-1361: Eucharist as thanksgiving
CCC 610, 1362-1372, 1382, 1436: Eucharist as sacrifice
CCC 1373-1381: the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist
CCC 1384-1401, 2837: Holy Communion
CCC 1402-1405: the Eucharist as the pledge of glory
CCC 611, 1366: institution of the priesthood at the Last Supper

Friday of the Passion of the Lord

CCC 602-618, 1992: the Passion of Christ
CCC 612, 2606, 2741: the prayer of Jesus
CCC 467, 540, 1137: Christ the High Priest
CCC 2825: Christ’s obedience and ours

EASTER (APR 4 – MAY 16)

Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord

CCC 638-655, 989, 1001-1002: the Resurrection of Christ and our resurrection
CCC 647, 1167-1170, 1243, 1287: Easter, the Lord’s Day
CCC 1212: the Sacraments of Initiation
CCC 1214-1222, 1226-1228, 1234-1245, 1254: Baptism
CCC 1286-1289: Confirmation
CCC 1322-1323: Eucharist

Second Sunday of Easter

CCC 448, 641-646: appearances of the risen Christ
CCC 1084-1089: sanctifying presence of the risen Christ in the liturgy
CCC 2177-2178, 1342: the Sunday Eucharist
CCC 654-655, 1988: our new birth in the Resurrection of Christ
CCC 976-983, 1441-1442: “I believe in the forgiveness of sins”
CCC 949-953, 1329, 1342, 2624, 2790: communion in spiritual goods

Third Sunday of Easter

CCC 1346-1347: the Eucharist and the experience of the disciples at Emmaus
CCC 642-644, 857, 995-996: the apostles and disciples as witnesses of the Resurrection
CCC 102, 601, 426-429, 2763: Christ the key to interpreting all Scripture
CCC 519, 662, 1137: Christ, our Advocate in heaven

Fourth Sunday of Easter

CCC 754, 764, 2665: Christ the Shepherd and Gate
CCC 553, 857, 861, 881, 896, 1558, 1561, 1568, 1574: Pope and bishops as shepherds
CCC 874, 1120, 1465, 1536, 1548-1551, 1564, 2179, 2686: priests as shepherds
CCC 756: Christ the cornerstone
CCC 1, 104, 239, 1692, 1709, 2009, 2736: we are God’s children now

Fifth Sunday of Easter

CCC 2746-2751: Christ’s prayer at the Last Supper
CCC 736, 737, 755, 787, 1108, 1988, 2074: Christ is the vine, we are the branches
CCC 953, 1822-1829: charity

Sixth Sunday of Easter

CCC 2746-2751: Christ’s prayer at the Last Supper
CCC 214, 218-221, 231, 257, 733, 2331, 2577: God is love
CCC 1789, 1822-1829, 2067, 2069: love of God and neighbor fulfills the Commandments
CCC 2347, 2709: friendship with Christ

The Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord

CCC 659-672, 697, 792, 965, 2795: the Ascension

Seventh Sunday of Easter

CCC 2746-2751: Christ’s prayer at the Last Supper
CCC 2614, 2741: Jesus prays for us
CCC 611, 2812, 2821: Jesus’ prayer sanctifies us, especially in the Eucharist

SOLEMNITIES & FEASTS (MAY 23 – JUN 6)

The Solemnity of Pentecost

CCC 696, 726, 731-732, 737-741, 830, 1076, 1287, 2623: Pentecost
CCC 599, 597,674, 715: apostolic witness on Pentecost
CCC 1152, 1226, 1302, 1556: the mystery of Pentecost continues in the Church
CCC 767, 775, 798, 796, 813, 1097, 1108-1109: the Church, communion in the Spirit

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

CCC 202, 232-260, 684, 732: the mystery of the Trinity
CCC 249, 813, 950, 1077-1109, 2845: the Trinity in the Church and her liturgy
CCC 2655, 2664-2672: the Trinity and prayer
CCC 2205: the family as an image of the Trinity

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ

CCC 790, 1003, 1322-1419: the Holy Eucharist
CCC 805, 950, 2181-2182, 2637, 2845: the Eucharist and the communion of believers
CCC 1212, 1275, 1436, 2837: the Eucharist as spiritual food

The Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus

CCC 210-211, 604: God’s mercy
CCC 430, 478, 545, 589, 1365, 1439, 1825, 1846: Christ’s love for all
CCC 2669: the Heart of Christ worthy of adoration
CCC 766, 1225: the Church born from the pierced side of Christ
CCC 1432, 2100: Christ’s love moves our hearts

ORDINARY TIME (JUN 13 -AUG 29)

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 543-546: announcing the Kingdom of God
CCC 2653-2654, 2660, 2716: the Kingdom grows by hearing the Word

Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time

CCC 423, 464-469: Jesus, true God and true Man
CCC 1814-1816: faith as gift of God, and human response
CCC 671-672: maintaining faith in adversity

VIEW UPCOMING SUNDAYS

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B) Catechism Scripture References

FIRST Reading

DEATH IS A CONSEQUENCE OF SIN

Death was therefore contrary to the plans of God the Creator and entered the world as a consequence of sin

CCC 1008 Death is a consequence of sin. The Church’s Magisterium, as authentic interpreter of the affirmations of Scripture and Tradition, teaches that death entered the world on account of man’s sin.1 Even though man’s nature is mortal God had destined him not to die. Death was therefore contrary to the plans of God the Creator and entered the world as a consequence of sin.2 “Bodily death, from which man would have been immune had he not sinned” is thus “the last enemy” of man left to be conquered.3

1 Cf. Gen 2:17; 3:3; 3:19; Wis 1:13; Rom 5:12; 6:23; DS 1511.
2 Cf. Wis 2:23-24.
3 GS 18 § 2; cf. 1 Cor 15:26.

SECOND Reading

REDEMPTION

Redemption comes to us above all through the blood of his cross, but this mystery is at work throughout Christ’s entire life: ….in his healings and exorcisms by which “he took our infirmities and bore our diseases” (cf. 517);

CCC 517 Christ’s whole life is a mystery of redemption. Redemption comes to us above all through the blood of his cross,1 but this mystery is at work throughout Christ’s entire life:
– already in his Incarnation through which by becoming poor he enriches us with his poverty;2
– in his hidden life which by his submission atones for our disobedience;3
– in his word which purifies its hearers;4
– in his healings and exorcisms by which “he took our infirmities and bore our diseases”;5
– and in his Resurrection by which he justifies us.6

CCC 1083 The dual dimension of the Christian liturgy as a response of faith and love to the spiritual blessings the Father bestows on us is thus evident. On the one hand, the Church, united with her Lord and “in the Holy Spirit,”7 blesses the Father “for his inexpressible gift”8 in her adoration, praise, and thanksgiving. On the other hand, until the consummation of God’s plan, the Church never ceases to present to the Father the offering of his own gifts and to beg him to send the Holy Spirit upon that offering, upon herself, upon the faithful, and upon the whole world, so that through communion in the death and resurrection of Christ the Priest, and by the power of the Spirit, these divine blessings will bring forth the fruits of life “to the praise of his glorious grace.”9

CCC 1351 From the very beginning Christians have brought, along with the bread and wine for the Eucharist, gifts to share with those in need. This custom of the collection, ever appropriate, is inspired by the example of Christ who became poor to make us rich:10
Those who are well off, and who are also willing, give as each chooses. What is gathered is given to him who presides to assist orphans and widows, those whom illness or any other cause has deprived of resources, prisoners, immigrants and, in a word, all who are in need.11

CCC 2122 “The minister should ask nothing for the administration of the sacraments beyond the offerings defined by the competent authority, always being careful that the needy are not deprived of the help of the sacraments because of their poverty.”12 The competent authority determines these “offerings” in accordance with the principle that the Christian people ought to contribute to the support of the Church’s ministers. “The laborer deserves his food.”13

CCC 2407 In economic matters, respect for human dignity requires the practice of the virtue of temperance, so as to moderate attachment to this world’s goods; the practice of the virtue of justice, to preserve our neighbor’s rights and render him what is his due; and the practice of solidarity, in accordance with the golden rule and in keeping with the generosity of the Lord, who “though he was rich, yet for your sake. .. became poor so that by his poverty, you might become rich.”14

CCC 2546 “Blessed are the poor in spirit.”15 The Beatitudes reveal an order of happiness and grace, of beauty and peace. Jesus celebrates the joy of the poor, to whom the Kingdom already belongs:16
The Word speaks of voluntary humility as “poverty in spirit”; the Apostle gives an example of God’s poverty when he says: “For your sakes he became poor.”17

CCC 2636 The first Christian communities lived this form of fellowship intensely.18 Thus the Apostle Paul gives them a share in his ministry of preaching the Gospel19 but also intercedes for them.20 The intercession of Christians recognizes no boundaries: “for all men, for kings and all who are in high positions,” for persecutors, for the salvation of those who reject the Gospel.21

CCC 2833 “Our” bread is the “one” loaf for the “many.” In the Beatitudes “poverty” is the virtue of sharing: it calls us to communicate and share both material and spiritual goods, not by coercion but out of love, so that the abundance of some may remedy the needs of others.22

1 Cf. Eph 1:7; Col 1:13-14; 1 Pt 1:18-19.
2 Cf. 2 Cor 8:9.
3 Cf. Lk 2:51.
4 Cf. Jn 15:3.
5 Mt 8:17; cf. Is 53:4.
6 Cf. Rom 4:25.
7 Lk 10:21.
8 2 Cor 9:15.
9 Eph 1:6.
10
11 St. Justin, Apol. 1, 67: PG 6, 429.
12 CIC, can. 848.
13 Mt 10:10; cf. Lk 10:7; 2 Cor 9:5-18; 1 Tim 5:17-18.
14 2 Cor 8:9.
15 Mt 5:3.
16 Cf. Lk 6:20.
17 St. Gregory of Nyssa, De beatitudinibus 1: PG 44, 1200D; cf. 2 Cor 8:9.
18 Cf. Acts 12:5; 20:36; 21:5; 2 Cor 9:14.
19 Cf. Eph 6:18-20; Col 4:3-4; 1 Thess 5:25.
20 Cf. 2 Thess 1:11; Col 1:3; Phil 1:3-4.
21 2 Tim 2:1; cf. Rom 12:14; 10:1.
22 Cf. 2 Cor 8:1-15.

GOSPEL

JESUS ASKS THE SICK TO BELIEVE

In the sacraments Christ continues to “touch” us in order to heal us. (cf. 1504)

CCC 472 This human soul that the Son of God assumed is endowed with a true human knowledge. As such, this knowledge could not in itself be unlimited: it was exercised in the historical conditions of his existence in space and time. This is why the Son of God could, when he became man, “increase in wisdom and in stature, and in favor with God and man”,1 and would even have to inquire for himself about what one in the human condition can learn only from experience.2 This corresponded to the reality of his voluntary emptying of himself, taking “the form of a slave”.3

CCC 548 The signs worked by Jesus attest that the Father has sent him. They invite belief in him.4 To those who turn to him in faith, he grants what they ask.5 So miracles strengthen faith in the One who does his Father’s works; they bear witness that he is the Son of God.6 But his miracles can also be occasions for “offence”;7 they are not intended to satisfy people’s curiosity or desire for magic Despite his evident miracles some people reject Jesus; he is even accused of acting by the power of demons.8

CCC 994 But there is more. Jesus links faith in the resurrection to his own person: “I am the Resurrection and the life.”9 It is Jesus himself who on the last day will raise up those who have believed in him, who have eaten his body and drunk his blood.10 Already now in this present life he gives a sign and pledge of this by restoring some of the dead to life,11 announcing thereby his own Resurrection, though it was to be of another order. He speaks of this unique event as the “sign of Jonah,”12 the sign of the temple: he announces that he will be put to death but rise thereafter on the third day.13

CCC 1504 Often Jesus asks the sick to believe.14 He makes use of signs to heal: spittle and the laying on of hands,15 mud and washing.16 The sick try to touch him, “for power came forth from him and healed them all.”17 And so in the sacraments Christ continues to “touch” us in order to heal us.

CCC 2616 Prayer to Jesus is answered by him already during his ministry, through signs that anticipate the power of his death and Resurrection: Jesus hears the prayer of faith, expressed in words (the leper, Jairus, the Canaanite woman, the good thief)18 or in silence (the bearers of the paralytic, the woman with a hemorrhage who touches his clothes, the tears and ointment of the sinful woman).19 The urgent request of the blind men, “Have mercy on us, Son of David” or “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” has-been renewed in the traditional prayer to Jesus known as the Jesus Prayer: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner!”20 Healing infirmities or forgiving sins, Jesus always responds to a prayer offered in faith: “Your faith has made you well; go in peace.”
St. Augustine wonderfully summarizes the three dimensions of Jesus’ prayer: “He prays for us as our priest, prays in us as our Head, and is prayed to by us as our God. Therefore let us acknowledge our voice in him and his in us.”21

1 Lk 2:52.
2 Cf. Mk 6 38; 8 27; Jn 11:34; etc.
3 Phil 2:7.
4 cf. Jn 5:36; 10:25, 38.
5 Cf. Mk 5:25-34; 10:52; etc.
6 Cf. Jn 10:31-38.
7 Mt 11:6.
8 Cf. Jn 11:47-48; Mk 3:22.
9 Jn 11:25.
10 Cf. Jn 5:24-25; 6:40,54.
11 Cf. Mk 5:21-42; Lk 7:11-17; Jn 11.
12 Mt 12:39.
13 Cf. Mk 10:34; Jn 2:19-22.
14 Cf. Mk 5:34, 36; 9:23.
15 Cf. Mk 7:32-36; 8:22-25.
16 Cf. Jn 9:6-7.
17 Lk 6:19; cf. Mk 1:41; 3:10; 6:56.
18 Cf. Mk 1:40-41; 5:36; 7:29; Cf. Lk 23:39-43.
19 Cf. Mk 25; 5:28; Lk 7:37-38.
20 Mt 9:27, Mk 10:48.
21 St. Augustine, En. in Ps. 85, 1: PL 37, 1081; cf. GILH 7.

SOURCE: The Catechism of the Catholic Church

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B) Theology Connections

CATHOLIC MORAL THEOLOGY BLOG

CHRISTIAN COMPASSION

by Conor Kelly

EXCERPT: There is a comforting note of compassion in the readings for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time in this cycle. This strikes me as the common theme across the three readings, but it is worth noting that each one has a particular nuance to the idea of Christian compassion that can help us see the moral significance of this perennial call.

The importance of compassion is most apparent in Jesus’ interactions with Jairus and the “woman afflicted with hemorrhages” in the Gospel. Jesus is quick to head off with Jairus after he makes his initial plea for assistance with his daughter who is “at the point of death.” On the way, Jesus has a peculiar encounter with a woman who is also seeking healing. She reaches out to touch his cloak on the assumption that this slight connection will be enough to heal her because Jesus is that powerful.

As it turns out, she is right. She is healed, but Jesus immediately realizes that he has been touched and a healing has occurred. He therefore looks for the person whom he has healed, causing much consternation among the disciples (and, we can assume, among the crowd pressed around him). Afraid of an accusation, the woman “approached in fear and trembling,” but Jesus is not looking to punish her. He offers a compassionate response: “Your faith has saved you. Go in peace and be cured of your affliction.”

Meanwhile, we hear word that Jairus’s daughter has died. As a parent, I can only begin to imagine the devastation that this news would have occasioned for Jairus, but Jesus reassures him to “just have faith.” He then heads into Jairus’s home where he raises the little girl and restores Jairus’s family in a powerful, and truly compassionate act.

In both cases, we have the sense that Jesus intimately understands the agony of the petitioners before him. He comforts the woman who is terrified that she will be in trouble for touching him without permission and preserves the healing she needed. He responds immediately to Jairus’s request for help, and then helps him navigate the setback of bad news from home before finally giving him exactly what he desired—a healthy daughter once again.

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SOURCE: CATHOLIC MORAL THEOLOGY BLOG

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13th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B) Catechism Lesson

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CATECHISM LESSONS

50 lessons recorded in 1965 by Archbishop Fulton J Sheen about the teachings of the Catholic Church.


CATECHISM LESSON

SACRAMENT OF THE SICK

Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick.

Shakespeare speaks of the ills the flesh is heir to(Hamlet, ACT III, Scene 1)

It is of those ills and sicknesses that we speak in the sacrament of extreme unction.

  • The sacrament could also be called the sacrament of the anointing of the sick.

First of all, as regards sickness itself.

It does many things to us not only physically but also psychologically.

  • First of all, it cuts us off from any occasion of sin. The will to sin is certainly weakened by physical infirmity. Then, too, sickness also manifests the uniqueness of our personality.

We begin to realize that I am I.

Self is confronted with self. 

  • The soul sees itself as it really is. Sickness breaks the spell that pleasure is everything, that we ought to go on building bigger and bigger barns, and that life is worthless unless there is a thrill in it.
  • It enables us also to readjust our sense of values. We begin to understand the words of our Lord, “What doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his immortal soul?”    (Matthew 16:26)

Then, too, it can end in death.

There is a world of difference between the way the pagan faces death and the way the Christian does.

  • The pagan fears the loss of the body,
  • the Christian fears the loss of the soul.

 

To the Christian, the physical life and the world are not everything.  This world is only a scaffolding to Him.  It is a scaffolding up through which souls climb to the Kingdom of Heaven, and when the last soul shall have climbed up through it, then it shall be torn down and burnt with fervent fire, not because it is base but simply because it has done its work.

 

And there is another difference between the pagan and the Christian as regards death. 

  • The Christian never feels that his whole being is threatened by death;
  • the pagan does. The pagan is always moving forward toward death, moving forward toward it, as if he were walking toward an abyss.
  • The Christian is walking backwards from death. Well, how does he walk backwards? Because he starts with that fact:

Someday I am going to die.  Someday I must render an account of my stewardship.  Knowing that I will die, I now prepare my life so that it may enter the Kingdom of Heaven.  The worst thing, therefore, that can happen to a Christian is not death. 

The greatest tragedy is not to have loved enough.

There is no need of laboring these points.  Sickness is very obvious, too obvious, indeed.  Our Lord was very much concerned about it.

SOURCE: The Universal Way (Fulton Sheen’s Christian Philosophy Course)

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B) Catechetical Resources

RCL BENZIGER

SANCTITY OF HUMAN LIFE


CATHOLIC DOCTRINE

Catholics treat human life as holy. We believe every human life is sacred because “from its beginning it involves the creative action of God and it remains for ever in a special relationship with the Creator, who is its sole end. God alone is the Lord of life from its beginning until its end: no one can under any circumstance claim…the right directly to destroy an innocent human being.”

Our communitarian vocation is thus a basis for teaching on a host of related topics, such as our interdependence, the common good, respect for the human person, equality and justice, and the need to transcend an individualistic morality. This comprehensive perspective, in turn, protects the most vulnerable among us, that is, the unborn, the newly born, the aged, and the sick. Believers choose to shield the weak from those who are strong in society. Therefore, abortion, infanticide, suicide, and euthanasia are not options for believers and are viewed as gravely sinful. These prohibitions stem from the consistent application of Church teaching that acclaims God as the author of all life and that we creatures cannot act as if we were the authors of human life.

Sacrament Connection

Anointing of the Sick is a sacrament that gives faith, hope and love for God to people who are very sick or dying. We can receive this sacrament anytime we are seriously ill. The sacrament helps join us to Jesus who knows how it feels to suffer. Sometimes people recover from their illness, but other times, the sacrament helps us prepare for our journey back to God.

The Gospel in Life

How can you bring about healing in someone’s life this week? Is there someone you know who is in pain? Is there something you can do to help lighten another’s load or give him/her courage?

SOURCE: RCL Benziger Classroom Activities, Year B

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